Tag Archives: run/walk plans

Running with the Pack 137: Race Fueling, Walk Runs, Happy Meals, and More

Stevie and I give some fueling advice to someone planning her first half marathon.  I talk about my switch to running before going to work.  Stevie talks about learning to accept walking as part of her running.  We also talk about McDonalds and their healthier Happy Meals.

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Running with the Pack 98: Ice Baths in Winter, Elliptical 101, Shortened Half-Marathon Training, and More

Just one topic this week: the Walt Disney World Marathon Weekend, cardiologist buy which includes Stevie’s 5K and half-marathon as well as my Goofy Challenge, case which is the half-marathon and marathon. We talk about preparing for the races, hemophilia getting to the start line, the race start, the course, what happened along the way, our finishes, and what we did afterward. It’s a long podcast, but worth listening to, especially if you’re considering doing these races!
Just one topic this week: the Walt Disney World Marathon Weekend, cardiologist buy which includes Stevie’s 5K and half-marathon as well as my Goofy Challenge, case which is the half-marathon and marathon. We talk about preparing for the races, hemophilia getting to the start line, the race start, the course, what happened along the way, our finishes, and what we did afterward. It’s a long podcast, but worth listening to, especially if you’re considering doing these races!
I had an interesting afternoon. From time to time, disease I feel a little flutter in my chest. It’s not painful. I don’t feel weak or faint. It’s just a funny feeling that happens every now and then when I’m at rest. So is that anything to worry about? It could be nothing, more about it could be an irregular heartbeat, cheap some kind of blockage, or a defect. I talk a lot on Running with the Pack about diet, exercise, fitness, etc…, but I always say that I’m no doctor.

I’m not the kind of guy who ignores medical issues and hopes that they go away, so I met with my doctor last week and explained the issue. He had me wear a heart monitor for 24 hours to catch the flutters when they happen, so I did that last week. He also scheduled me for a “stress test plus echo”, which I had this afternoon.

What they had me do was change into running shoes and shorts and then they hooked up a collection of electrodes to my chest. The technician had me lay on my left side on an examination table and then he did an ultrasound of various parts of my heart and from various angles. While he was doing that, we talked about all sorts of things – what both of us do to keep in shape, the typical people he usually has in his lab, whether I was having a boy or girl (his response, “twins!”). He wouldn’t tell me any of the results though – that’s reserved for the doctor.

After the ultrasound, the technician left the room and returned in a few minutes with the doctor. They put me on the treadmill and started it off at a low incline and a comfortable walking pace. The doctor took my blood pressure and watched the electrical signals of my heart on the heart monitor. Every two minutes, they increased the speed and slope and took another blood pressure reading. I was on the treadmill for 12 minutes, by which time, I had hit my maximum heart rate (180) and was running on a 16% incline (I’m not sure of the speed). I felt fine and could have kept going, but he said that they wouldn’t learn anything from going longer.

They shut down the treadmill and moved me right back to the examination table so they could take more ultrasound pictures of my heart while it was pumping hard. Same as before – various parts of my heart from various angles. My heart rate came down to a normal level.

The rest of the session was the doctor showing me various segments of the ultrasound videos: This is your heart at rest, this is what it looks like at full blast, this is your valve function, this is a Doppler image showing the direction of the blood flow, this is the thickness of your heart walls, etc…

It was amazing and beautiful to see my heart in action. As someone who exercises a lot, I look at my heart rate to gauge how well I’m doing and my level of effort, but that is a gross indicator of what my heart is doing compared to seeing clear images of the way that it does what it does. The whole thing was a little piece of science fiction. When I commented about how clear the images were, the technician and doctor laughed and then the doctor said that there is a general rule in cardiology: the clearer the image, the better the prognosis. A lot of that has to do with it being easier to get a good ultrasound from people who have lower body weights since the sound waves have to pass through less tissue.

The short version of the doctor’s summary is that I’m as healthy as a horse. Great blood supply, no irregularities, normal adaptation from rest to active state and back again, good valve movement, etc… I asked specifically about any thickening of my heart walls since that’s a concern that Andrew has read about in some endurance athletes, but my heart walls were the normal thickness that they would expect in an active person. Ultimately, the flutter is completely within the normal range of a healthy heart, especially since he didn’t see any sign of it when I was stressed to maximum heart rate. It’s nothing that I need to worry about.

Overall, it was a fascinating experience and a huge relief to know that I’m okay. I’m glad I went and got the green light to keep doing the things that I love to do.

Anyway, I hope this is helpful for anyone who needs to have one of these tests done, so you know what they are looking for, what to expect, and what questions to ask.
This week, vitamin arthritis we talk about myRunning with the Pack 98: Ice Baths in Winter, buy viagra Elliptical 101, web Shortened Half-Marathon Training, and More split times for the Disney Marathon, doing an ice bath during winter, the right settings for an elliptical machine to simulate running, a bit about the stair stepper machines, what to do when you have an upcoming half-marathon and limited training time, our plans for Pittsburgh, and John’s voicemail about his recent marathon experience.

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