Running with the Pack 17: Arts Fest, Sloppy Socks, Solo Podcasting, Fuel, and Buckeye Outdoors

I swear this guy holds the key to world peace…

India is my favorite.

I swear this guy holds the key to world peace…

India is my favorite.

Hi All. I just wanted to write a post to send good thoughts to Miesha Marzell, stuff who we interviewed way back in episode #6. She is participating in the Olympic Trials now and her races are tomorrow. I don’t think it’s right to pray for someone to win, but I do hope that she runs a good race and doesn’t have any complications from illness or injury.
I swear this guy holds the key to world peace…

India is my favorite.

Hi All. I just wanted to write a post to send good thoughts to Miesha Marzell, stuff who we interviewed way back in episode #6. She is participating in the Olympic Trials now and her races are tomorrow. I don’t think it’s right to pray for someone to win, but I do hope that she runs a good race and doesn’t have any complications from illness or injury.
Jeff and I talk about our training in the heat, information pills inspirational stories from our listeners, discount and upcoming races. If you want to submit your own story, leave a comment at parkedthoughts.com or send it to allan@parkedthoughts.com or jeff@jsswain.com

Mentioned in this episode:

I swear this guy holds the key to world peace…

India is my favorite.

Hi All. I just wanted to write a post to send good thoughts to Miesha Marzell, stuff who we interviewed way back in episode #6. She is participating in the Olympic Trials now and her races are tomorrow. I don’t think it’s right to pray for someone to win, but I do hope that she runs a good race and doesn’t have any complications from illness or injury.
Jeff and I talk about our training in the heat, information pills inspirational stories from our listeners, discount and upcoming races. If you want to submit your own story, leave a comment at parkedthoughts.com or send it to allan@parkedthoughts.com or jeff@jsswain.com

Mentioned in this episode:

Today I ran the Central Pennsylvania Festival of the Arts 10K with a group of friends: Stevie and Nancy (from episode # 15), diagnosis along with Stevie’s husband and son, and Nancy’s neighbor. My friend Chris came as well to run the 5K race (his first race). So overall, it was a very nice sized “pack” to run with.

The weather forecast said that it would be in the 70’s with high humidity and a 40% chance of rain. It was definitely raining last night, but stopped by the time we got to the race registration area. I was really hoping for a light shower, but no such luck. Chris and I registered and then did some walking and stretching before the 10K race began — the 5K started 15 minutes later.

The race started at 8:30 with a downhill run for the first mile or so. As usual, I started off a little too quickly, but I was feeling strong and light, so it was hard to help myself. We ran across campus, across a building-bridge to the Penn State golf course, around half of the golf course and then hit a rather steep hill around mile 4. The hill and the heat slowed me down a bit at that point and I was passed by a few people. We went back across the bridge to campus, up another hill, and then a dash to the finish.

I think in the podcast, I had said something about expecting to run it in about 45:00, but that was an exaggeration. I haven’t done a 10K for a while and thought I would get something below 50 minutes. I finished in 49:46, which is an 8:02 pace.

But more than the race and my time, I think I most enjoyed cheering everyone else to the finish. I was very impressed by how everyone did, especially Chris, who finished the 5K in about 25 minutes. That’s very good for a first-time racer and it’s not too far off my pace, so I may be developing another running partner. After the race, we talked about what we thought of the course, how we handled the hills, and the people who were running around us. We grabbed some water and walked back to the registration area to get something to eat before finally deciding to go home. Again, that post-race interaction was the best part of the event today.

Racing is more social than running by yourself. Racing with friends is truly satisfying.
I swear this guy holds the key to world peace…

India is my favorite.

Hi All. I just wanted to write a post to send good thoughts to Miesha Marzell, stuff who we interviewed way back in episode #6. She is participating in the Olympic Trials now and her races are tomorrow. I don’t think it’s right to pray for someone to win, but I do hope that she runs a good race and doesn’t have any complications from illness or injury.
Jeff and I talk about our training in the heat, information pills inspirational stories from our listeners, discount and upcoming races. If you want to submit your own story, leave a comment at parkedthoughts.com or send it to allan@parkedthoughts.com or jeff@jsswain.com

Mentioned in this episode:

Today I ran the Central Pennsylvania Festival of the Arts 10K with a group of friends: Stevie and Nancy (from episode # 15), diagnosis along with Stevie’s husband and son, and Nancy’s neighbor. My friend Chris came as well to run the 5K race (his first race). So overall, it was a very nice sized “pack” to run with.

The weather forecast said that it would be in the 70’s with high humidity and a 40% chance of rain. It was definitely raining last night, but stopped by the time we got to the race registration area. I was really hoping for a light shower, but no such luck. Chris and I registered and then did some walking and stretching before the 10K race began — the 5K started 15 minutes later.

The race started at 8:30 with a downhill run for the first mile or so. As usual, I started off a little too quickly, but I was feeling strong and light, so it was hard to help myself. We ran across campus, across a building-bridge to the Penn State golf course, around half of the golf course and then hit a rather steep hill around mile 4. The hill and the heat slowed me down a bit at that point and I was passed by a few people. We went back across the bridge to campus, up another hill, and then a dash to the finish.

I think in the podcast, I had said something about expecting to run it in about 45:00, but that was an exaggeration. I haven’t done a 10K for a while and thought I would get something below 50 minutes. I finished in 49:46, which is an 8:02 pace.

But more than the race and my time, I think I most enjoyed cheering everyone else to the finish. I was very impressed by how everyone did, especially Chris, who finished the 5K in about 25 minutes. That’s very good for a first-time racer and it’s not too far off my pace, so I may be developing another running partner. After the race, we talked about what we thought of the course, how we handled the hills, and the people who were running around us. We grabbed some water and walked back to the registration area to get something to eat before finally deciding to go home. Again, that post-race interaction was the best part of the event today.

Racing is more social than running by yourself. Racing with friends is truly satisfying.
Normally I don’t travel far for a 5K race. I enjoy doing them, this but town where we live (State College, PA) and the surrounding towns have at least one 5K race most weekends between March and November. Today was a little different. I went to Holidaysburg, PA (about an hour away) with a group of women from the Nittany Valley Running Club to run the Sloppy Socks 5K. One of them had mentioned it on the club’s e-mail list and it sounded like fun. This 5K was not your typical road race.

Sloppy Socks 5K (before)

As you can see in the picture, the day started off with the usual early morning fog. It quickly burned off by the time they gathered the 150 or so runners for the 8:30 race start. This was the first annual running of this race, so no one was completely sure where it was going to take us. Fortunately, the race volunteers had marked the course with cones and little orange flags (the kind that utility workers often use to identify the path of underground cables and pipes). We also had a little time to scout out part of the course before starting. The race director made a few announcements and then handed the mic over to an assistant so he could find his place at the starting line.

Once the whistle was blown, we started out across a field. It instantly brought back memories of my old high school cross country days. I was happily running and reminiscing — until the still-packed group of runners around me hit the mud pit. There was no way around it. We had to jump down a couple of feet into a slimy mud pit. I’m not sure of the exact dimensions, but that was long enough that you couldn’t jump it and deep enough that everyone’s shoes filled with goo. So I jumped in with both feet and then made my way to the other side to climb out again and slosh onward.

Sloppy Socks 5K (All for one and one for all)

[Notice the change in our shoe color.]

We ran back onto the fields again for a while before heading back to a trail, over some fallen branches, and down into a creek bed. The course went down the creek bed across smooth (and slippery) stones, and then back up a steep embankment again. The course went back to the fields, into the woods again for a bit, and then back toward the starting. That was loop/mile one. We did the same course (including the same mud pit) two more times before taking the final path to the finish line. Speaking of the finish line, Cheryl, one of the club members, was the top woman finisher. I just met her today, but apparently she is no stranger to first place in normal road-running events.

I finished the course in about 25:34, which is a bad 5K time for me, but I really don’t care because 1) it was an obstacle course, 2) it seemed like it was longer than 3.1 miles, and 3) I had too much fun to let the clock bother me. Overall, I give this event a definite thumbs-up. I hope they have it again next year and I would be interested in doing similar events in the future.

Sloppy Socks 5K (after)
I swear this guy holds the key to world peace…

India is my favorite.

Hi All. I just wanted to write a post to send good thoughts to Miesha Marzell, stuff who we interviewed way back in episode #6. She is participating in the Olympic Trials now and her races are tomorrow. I don’t think it’s right to pray for someone to win, but I do hope that she runs a good race and doesn’t have any complications from illness or injury.
Jeff and I talk about our training in the heat, information pills inspirational stories from our listeners, discount and upcoming races. If you want to submit your own story, leave a comment at parkedthoughts.com or send it to allan@parkedthoughts.com or jeff@jsswain.com

Mentioned in this episode:

Today I ran the Central Pennsylvania Festival of the Arts 10K with a group of friends: Stevie and Nancy (from episode # 15), diagnosis along with Stevie’s husband and son, and Nancy’s neighbor. My friend Chris came as well to run the 5K race (his first race). So overall, it was a very nice sized “pack” to run with.

The weather forecast said that it would be in the 70’s with high humidity and a 40% chance of rain. It was definitely raining last night, but stopped by the time we got to the race registration area. I was really hoping for a light shower, but no such luck. Chris and I registered and then did some walking and stretching before the 10K race began — the 5K started 15 minutes later.

The race started at 8:30 with a downhill run for the first mile or so. As usual, I started off a little too quickly, but I was feeling strong and light, so it was hard to help myself. We ran across campus, across a building-bridge to the Penn State golf course, around half of the golf course and then hit a rather steep hill around mile 4. The hill and the heat slowed me down a bit at that point and I was passed by a few people. We went back across the bridge to campus, up another hill, and then a dash to the finish.

I think in the podcast, I had said something about expecting to run it in about 45:00, but that was an exaggeration. I haven’t done a 10K for a while and thought I would get something below 50 minutes. I finished in 49:46, which is an 8:02 pace.

But more than the race and my time, I think I most enjoyed cheering everyone else to the finish. I was very impressed by how everyone did, especially Chris, who finished the 5K in about 25 minutes. That’s very good for a first-time racer and it’s not too far off my pace, so I may be developing another running partner. After the race, we talked about what we thought of the course, how we handled the hills, and the people who were running around us. We grabbed some water and walked back to the registration area to get something to eat before finally deciding to go home. Again, that post-race interaction was the best part of the event today.

Racing is more social than running by yourself. Racing with friends is truly satisfying.
Normally I don’t travel far for a 5K race. I enjoy doing them, this but town where we live (State College, PA) and the surrounding towns have at least one 5K race most weekends between March and November. Today was a little different. I went to Holidaysburg, PA (about an hour away) with a group of women from the Nittany Valley Running Club to run the Sloppy Socks 5K. One of them had mentioned it on the club’s e-mail list and it sounded like fun. This 5K was not your typical road race.

Sloppy Socks 5K (before)

As you can see in the picture, the day started off with the usual early morning fog. It quickly burned off by the time they gathered the 150 or so runners for the 8:30 race start. This was the first annual running of this race, so no one was completely sure where it was going to take us. Fortunately, the race volunteers had marked the course with cones and little orange flags (the kind that utility workers often use to identify the path of underground cables and pipes). We also had a little time to scout out part of the course before starting. The race director made a few announcements and then handed the mic over to an assistant so he could find his place at the starting line.

Once the whistle was blown, we started out across a field. It instantly brought back memories of my old high school cross country days. I was happily running and reminiscing — until the still-packed group of runners around me hit the mud pit. There was no way around it. We had to jump down a couple of feet into a slimy mud pit. I’m not sure of the exact dimensions, but that was long enough that you couldn’t jump it and deep enough that everyone’s shoes filled with goo. So I jumped in with both feet and then made my way to the other side to climb out again and slosh onward.

Sloppy Socks 5K (All for one and one for all)

[Notice the change in our shoe color.]

We ran back onto the fields again for a while before heading back to a trail, over some fallen branches, and down into a creek bed. The course went down the creek bed across smooth (and slippery) stones, and then back up a steep embankment again. The course went back to the fields, into the woods again for a bit, and then back toward the starting. That was loop/mile one. We did the same course (including the same mud pit) two more times before taking the final path to the finish line. Speaking of the finish line, Cheryl, one of the club members, was the top woman finisher. I just met her today, but apparently she is no stranger to first place in normal road-running events.

I finished the course in about 25:34, which is a bad 5K time for me, but I really don’t care because 1) it was an obstacle course, 2) it seemed like it was longer than 3.1 miles, and 3) I had too much fun to let the clock bother me. Overall, I give this event a definite thumbs-up. I hope they have it again next year and I would be interested in doing similar events in the future.

Sloppy Socks 5K (after)
Normally I don’t travel far for a 5K race. I enjoy doing them, ailment but town where we live (State College, more info PA) and the surrounding towns have at least one 5K race most weekends between March and November. Today was a little different. I went to Holidaysburg, PA (about an hour away) with a group of women from the Nittany Valley Running Club to run the Sloppy Socks 5K. One of them had mentioned it on the club’s e-mail list and it sounded like fun. This 5K was not your typical road race.

Sloppy Socks 5K (before)

As you can see in the picture, the day started off with the usual early morning fog. It quickly burned off by the time they gathered the 150 or so runners for the 8:30 race start. This was the first annual running of this race, so no one was completely sure where it was going to take us. Fortunately, the race volunteers had marked the course with cones and little orange flags (the kind that utility workers often use to identify the path of underground cables and pipes). We also had a little time to scout out part of the course before starting. The race director made a few announcements and then handed the mic over to an assistant so he could find his place at the starting line.

Once the whistle was blown, we started out across a field. It instantly brought back memories of my old high school cross country days. I was happily running and reminiscing — until the still-packed group of runners around me hit the mud pit. There was no way around it. We had to jump down a couple of feet into a slimy mud pit. I’m not sure of the exact dimensions, but that was long enough that you couldn’t jump it and deep enough that everyone’s shoes filled with goo. So I jumped in with both feet and then made my way to the other side to climb out again and slosh onward.

Sloppy Socks 5K (All for one and one for all)

We ran back onto the fields again for a while before heading back to a trail, over some fallen branches, and down into a creek bed. The course went down the creek bed across smooth (and slippery) stones, and then back up a steep embankment again. The course went back to the fields, into the woods again for a bit, and then back toward the starting. That was loop/mile one. We did the same course (including the same mud pit) two more times before taking the final path to the finish line. Speaking of the finish line, Cheryl, one of the club members, was the top woman finisher. I just met her today, but apparently she is no stranger to first place in normal road-running events.

I finished the course in about 25:34, which is a bad 5K time for me, but I really don’t care because 1) it was an obstacle course, 2) it seemed like it was longer than 3.1 miles, and 3) I had too much fun to let the clock bother me. Overall, I give this event a definite thumbs-up. I hope they have it again next year and I would be interested in doing similar events in the future.

Sloppy Socks 5K (after)
I swear this guy holds the key to world peace…

India is my favorite.

Hi All. I just wanted to write a post to send good thoughts to Miesha Marzell, stuff who we interviewed way back in episode #6. She is participating in the Olympic Trials now and her races are tomorrow. I don’t think it’s right to pray for someone to win, but I do hope that she runs a good race and doesn’t have any complications from illness or injury.
Jeff and I talk about our training in the heat, information pills inspirational stories from our listeners, discount and upcoming races. If you want to submit your own story, leave a comment at parkedthoughts.com or send it to allan@parkedthoughts.com or jeff@jsswain.com

Mentioned in this episode:

Today I ran the Central Pennsylvania Festival of the Arts 10K with a group of friends: Stevie and Nancy (from episode # 15), diagnosis along with Stevie’s husband and son, and Nancy’s neighbor. My friend Chris came as well to run the 5K race (his first race). So overall, it was a very nice sized “pack” to run with.

The weather forecast said that it would be in the 70’s with high humidity and a 40% chance of rain. It was definitely raining last night, but stopped by the time we got to the race registration area. I was really hoping for a light shower, but no such luck. Chris and I registered and then did some walking and stretching before the 10K race began — the 5K started 15 minutes later.

The race started at 8:30 with a downhill run for the first mile or so. As usual, I started off a little too quickly, but I was feeling strong and light, so it was hard to help myself. We ran across campus, across a building-bridge to the Penn State golf course, around half of the golf course and then hit a rather steep hill around mile 4. The hill and the heat slowed me down a bit at that point and I was passed by a few people. We went back across the bridge to campus, up another hill, and then a dash to the finish.

I think in the podcast, I had said something about expecting to run it in about 45:00, but that was an exaggeration. I haven’t done a 10K for a while and thought I would get something below 50 minutes. I finished in 49:46, which is an 8:02 pace.

But more than the race and my time, I think I most enjoyed cheering everyone else to the finish. I was very impressed by how everyone did, especially Chris, who finished the 5K in about 25 minutes. That’s very good for a first-time racer and it’s not too far off my pace, so I may be developing another running partner. After the race, we talked about what we thought of the course, how we handled the hills, and the people who were running around us. We grabbed some water and walked back to the registration area to get something to eat before finally deciding to go home. Again, that post-race interaction was the best part of the event today.

Racing is more social than running by yourself. Racing with friends is truly satisfying.
Normally I don’t travel far for a 5K race. I enjoy doing them, this but town where we live (State College, PA) and the surrounding towns have at least one 5K race most weekends between March and November. Today was a little different. I went to Holidaysburg, PA (about an hour away) with a group of women from the Nittany Valley Running Club to run the Sloppy Socks 5K. One of them had mentioned it on the club’s e-mail list and it sounded like fun. This 5K was not your typical road race.

Sloppy Socks 5K (before)

As you can see in the picture, the day started off with the usual early morning fog. It quickly burned off by the time they gathered the 150 or so runners for the 8:30 race start. This was the first annual running of this race, so no one was completely sure where it was going to take us. Fortunately, the race volunteers had marked the course with cones and little orange flags (the kind that utility workers often use to identify the path of underground cables and pipes). We also had a little time to scout out part of the course before starting. The race director made a few announcements and then handed the mic over to an assistant so he could find his place at the starting line.

Once the whistle was blown, we started out across a field. It instantly brought back memories of my old high school cross country days. I was happily running and reminiscing — until the still-packed group of runners around me hit the mud pit. There was no way around it. We had to jump down a couple of feet into a slimy mud pit. I’m not sure of the exact dimensions, but that was long enough that you couldn’t jump it and deep enough that everyone’s shoes filled with goo. So I jumped in with both feet and then made my way to the other side to climb out again and slosh onward.

Sloppy Socks 5K (All for one and one for all)

[Notice the change in our shoe color.]

We ran back onto the fields again for a while before heading back to a trail, over some fallen branches, and down into a creek bed. The course went down the creek bed across smooth (and slippery) stones, and then back up a steep embankment again. The course went back to the fields, into the woods again for a bit, and then back toward the starting. That was loop/mile one. We did the same course (including the same mud pit) two more times before taking the final path to the finish line. Speaking of the finish line, Cheryl, one of the club members, was the top woman finisher. I just met her today, but apparently she is no stranger to first place in normal road-running events.

I finished the course in about 25:34, which is a bad 5K time for me, but I really don’t care because 1) it was an obstacle course, 2) it seemed like it was longer than 3.1 miles, and 3) I had too much fun to let the clock bother me. Overall, I give this event a definite thumbs-up. I hope they have it again next year and I would be interested in doing similar events in the future.

Sloppy Socks 5K (after)
Normally I don’t travel far for a 5K race. I enjoy doing them, ailment but town where we live (State College, more info PA) and the surrounding towns have at least one 5K race most weekends between March and November. Today was a little different. I went to Holidaysburg, PA (about an hour away) with a group of women from the Nittany Valley Running Club to run the Sloppy Socks 5K. One of them had mentioned it on the club’s e-mail list and it sounded like fun. This 5K was not your typical road race.

Sloppy Socks 5K (before)

As you can see in the picture, the day started off with the usual early morning fog. It quickly burned off by the time they gathered the 150 or so runners for the 8:30 race start. This was the first annual running of this race, so no one was completely sure where it was going to take us. Fortunately, the race volunteers had marked the course with cones and little orange flags (the kind that utility workers often use to identify the path of underground cables and pipes). We also had a little time to scout out part of the course before starting. The race director made a few announcements and then handed the mic over to an assistant so he could find his place at the starting line.

Once the whistle was blown, we started out across a field. It instantly brought back memories of my old high school cross country days. I was happily running and reminiscing — until the still-packed group of runners around me hit the mud pit. There was no way around it. We had to jump down a couple of feet into a slimy mud pit. I’m not sure of the exact dimensions, but that was long enough that you couldn’t jump it and deep enough that everyone’s shoes filled with goo. So I jumped in with both feet and then made my way to the other side to climb out again and slosh onward.

Sloppy Socks 5K (All for one and one for all)

We ran back onto the fields again for a while before heading back to a trail, over some fallen branches, and down into a creek bed. The course went down the creek bed across smooth (and slippery) stones, and then back up a steep embankment again. The course went back to the fields, into the woods again for a bit, and then back toward the starting. That was loop/mile one. We did the same course (including the same mud pit) two more times before taking the final path to the finish line. Speaking of the finish line, Cheryl, one of the club members, was the top woman finisher. I just met her today, but apparently she is no stranger to first place in normal road-running events.

I finished the course in about 25:34, which is a bad 5K time for me, but I really don’t care because 1) it was an obstacle course, 2) it seemed like it was longer than 3.1 miles, and 3) I had too much fun to let the clock bother me. Overall, I give this event a definite thumbs-up. I hope they have it again next year and I would be interested in doing similar events in the future.

Sloppy Socks 5K (after)
Today I ran the Central Pennsylvania Festival of the Arts 10K with a group of friends: Stevie and Nancy (from episode # 15), stomatology along with Stevie’s husband and son, abortion and Nancy’s neighbor. My friend Chris came as well to run the 5K race (his first race). So overall, it was a very nice sized “pack” to run with.

The weather forecast said that it would be in the 70’s with high humidity and a 40% chance of rain. It was definitely raining last night, but stopped by the time we got to the race registration area. I was really hoping for a light shower, but no such luck. Chris and I registered and then did some walking and stretching before the 10K race began — the 5K started 15 minutes later.

The race started at 8:30 with a downhill run for the first mile or so. As usual, I started off a little too quickly, but I was feeling strong and light, so it was hard to help myself. We ran across campus, across a building-bridge to the Penn State golf course, around half of the golf course and then hit a rather steep hill around mile 4. The hill and the heat slowed me down a bit at that point and I was passed by a few people. We went back across the bridge to campus, up another hill, and then a dash to the finish.

I think in the podcast, I had said something about expecting to run it in about 45:00, but that was an exaggeration. I haven’t done a 10K for a while and thought I would get something below 50 minutes. I finished in 49:46, which is an 8:02 pace.

But more than the race and my time, I think I most enjoyed cheering everyone else to the finish. I was very impressed by how everyone did, especially Chris, who finished the 5K in about 25 minutes. That’s very good for a first-time racer and it’s not too far off my pace, so I may be developing another running partner. After the race, we talked about what we thought of the course, how we handled the hills, and the people who were running around us. We grabbed some water and walked back to the registration area to get something to eat before finally deciding to go home. Again, that post-race interaction was the best part of the event today.

Racing is more social than running by yourself. Racing with friends is truly satisfying.
I swear this guy holds the key to world peace…

India is my favorite.

Hi All. I just wanted to write a post to send good thoughts to Miesha Marzell, stuff who we interviewed way back in episode #6. She is participating in the Olympic Trials now and her races are tomorrow. I don’t think it’s right to pray for someone to win, but I do hope that she runs a good race and doesn’t have any complications from illness or injury.
Jeff and I talk about our training in the heat, information pills inspirational stories from our listeners, discount and upcoming races. If you want to submit your own story, leave a comment at parkedthoughts.com or send it to allan@parkedthoughts.com or jeff@jsswain.com

Mentioned in this episode:

Today I ran the Central Pennsylvania Festival of the Arts 10K with a group of friends: Stevie and Nancy (from episode # 15), diagnosis along with Stevie’s husband and son, and Nancy’s neighbor. My friend Chris came as well to run the 5K race (his first race). So overall, it was a very nice sized “pack” to run with.

The weather forecast said that it would be in the 70’s with high humidity and a 40% chance of rain. It was definitely raining last night, but stopped by the time we got to the race registration area. I was really hoping for a light shower, but no such luck. Chris and I registered and then did some walking and stretching before the 10K race began — the 5K started 15 minutes later.

The race started at 8:30 with a downhill run for the first mile or so. As usual, I started off a little too quickly, but I was feeling strong and light, so it was hard to help myself. We ran across campus, across a building-bridge to the Penn State golf course, around half of the golf course and then hit a rather steep hill around mile 4. The hill and the heat slowed me down a bit at that point and I was passed by a few people. We went back across the bridge to campus, up another hill, and then a dash to the finish.

I think in the podcast, I had said something about expecting to run it in about 45:00, but that was an exaggeration. I haven’t done a 10K for a while and thought I would get something below 50 minutes. I finished in 49:46, which is an 8:02 pace.

But more than the race and my time, I think I most enjoyed cheering everyone else to the finish. I was very impressed by how everyone did, especially Chris, who finished the 5K in about 25 minutes. That’s very good for a first-time racer and it’s not too far off my pace, so I may be developing another running partner. After the race, we talked about what we thought of the course, how we handled the hills, and the people who were running around us. We grabbed some water and walked back to the registration area to get something to eat before finally deciding to go home. Again, that post-race interaction was the best part of the event today.

Racing is more social than running by yourself. Racing with friends is truly satisfying.
Normally I don’t travel far for a 5K race. I enjoy doing them, this but town where we live (State College, PA) and the surrounding towns have at least one 5K race most weekends between March and November. Today was a little different. I went to Holidaysburg, PA (about an hour away) with a group of women from the Nittany Valley Running Club to run the Sloppy Socks 5K. One of them had mentioned it on the club’s e-mail list and it sounded like fun. This 5K was not your typical road race.

Sloppy Socks 5K (before)

As you can see in the picture, the day started off with the usual early morning fog. It quickly burned off by the time they gathered the 150 or so runners for the 8:30 race start. This was the first annual running of this race, so no one was completely sure where it was going to take us. Fortunately, the race volunteers had marked the course with cones and little orange flags (the kind that utility workers often use to identify the path of underground cables and pipes). We also had a little time to scout out part of the course before starting. The race director made a few announcements and then handed the mic over to an assistant so he could find his place at the starting line.

Once the whistle was blown, we started out across a field. It instantly brought back memories of my old high school cross country days. I was happily running and reminiscing — until the still-packed group of runners around me hit the mud pit. There was no way around it. We had to jump down a couple of feet into a slimy mud pit. I’m not sure of the exact dimensions, but that was long enough that you couldn’t jump it and deep enough that everyone’s shoes filled with goo. So I jumped in with both feet and then made my way to the other side to climb out again and slosh onward.

Sloppy Socks 5K (All for one and one for all)

[Notice the change in our shoe color.]

We ran back onto the fields again for a while before heading back to a trail, over some fallen branches, and down into a creek bed. The course went down the creek bed across smooth (and slippery) stones, and then back up a steep embankment again. The course went back to the fields, into the woods again for a bit, and then back toward the starting. That was loop/mile one. We did the same course (including the same mud pit) two more times before taking the final path to the finish line. Speaking of the finish line, Cheryl, one of the club members, was the top woman finisher. I just met her today, but apparently she is no stranger to first place in normal road-running events.

I finished the course in about 25:34, which is a bad 5K time for me, but I really don’t care because 1) it was an obstacle course, 2) it seemed like it was longer than 3.1 miles, and 3) I had too much fun to let the clock bother me. Overall, I give this event a definite thumbs-up. I hope they have it again next year and I would be interested in doing similar events in the future.

Sloppy Socks 5K (after)
Normally I don’t travel far for a 5K race. I enjoy doing them, ailment but town where we live (State College, more info PA) and the surrounding towns have at least one 5K race most weekends between March and November. Today was a little different. I went to Holidaysburg, PA (about an hour away) with a group of women from the Nittany Valley Running Club to run the Sloppy Socks 5K. One of them had mentioned it on the club’s e-mail list and it sounded like fun. This 5K was not your typical road race.

Sloppy Socks 5K (before)

As you can see in the picture, the day started off with the usual early morning fog. It quickly burned off by the time they gathered the 150 or so runners for the 8:30 race start. This was the first annual running of this race, so no one was completely sure where it was going to take us. Fortunately, the race volunteers had marked the course with cones and little orange flags (the kind that utility workers often use to identify the path of underground cables and pipes). We also had a little time to scout out part of the course before starting. The race director made a few announcements and then handed the mic over to an assistant so he could find his place at the starting line.

Once the whistle was blown, we started out across a field. It instantly brought back memories of my old high school cross country days. I was happily running and reminiscing — until the still-packed group of runners around me hit the mud pit. There was no way around it. We had to jump down a couple of feet into a slimy mud pit. I’m not sure of the exact dimensions, but that was long enough that you couldn’t jump it and deep enough that everyone’s shoes filled with goo. So I jumped in with both feet and then made my way to the other side to climb out again and slosh onward.

Sloppy Socks 5K (All for one and one for all)

We ran back onto the fields again for a while before heading back to a trail, over some fallen branches, and down into a creek bed. The course went down the creek bed across smooth (and slippery) stones, and then back up a steep embankment again. The course went back to the fields, into the woods again for a bit, and then back toward the starting. That was loop/mile one. We did the same course (including the same mud pit) two more times before taking the final path to the finish line. Speaking of the finish line, Cheryl, one of the club members, was the top woman finisher. I just met her today, but apparently she is no stranger to first place in normal road-running events.

I finished the course in about 25:34, which is a bad 5K time for me, but I really don’t care because 1) it was an obstacle course, 2) it seemed like it was longer than 3.1 miles, and 3) I had too much fun to let the clock bother me. Overall, I give this event a definite thumbs-up. I hope they have it again next year and I would be interested in doing similar events in the future.

Sloppy Socks 5K (after)
Today I ran the Central Pennsylvania Festival of the Arts 10K with a group of friends: Stevie and Nancy (from episode # 15), stomatology along with Stevie’s husband and son, abortion and Nancy’s neighbor. My friend Chris came as well to run the 5K race (his first race). So overall, it was a very nice sized “pack” to run with.

The weather forecast said that it would be in the 70’s with high humidity and a 40% chance of rain. It was definitely raining last night, but stopped by the time we got to the race registration area. I was really hoping for a light shower, but no such luck. Chris and I registered and then did some walking and stretching before the 10K race began — the 5K started 15 minutes later.

The race started at 8:30 with a downhill run for the first mile or so. As usual, I started off a little too quickly, but I was feeling strong and light, so it was hard to help myself. We ran across campus, across a building-bridge to the Penn State golf course, around half of the golf course and then hit a rather steep hill around mile 4. The hill and the heat slowed me down a bit at that point and I was passed by a few people. We went back across the bridge to campus, up another hill, and then a dash to the finish.

I think in the podcast, I had said something about expecting to run it in about 45:00, but that was an exaggeration. I haven’t done a 10K for a while and thought I would get something below 50 minutes. I finished in 49:46, which is an 8:02 pace.

But more than the race and my time, I think I most enjoyed cheering everyone else to the finish. I was very impressed by how everyone did, especially Chris, who finished the 5K in about 25 minutes. That’s very good for a first-time racer and it’s not too far off my pace, so I may be developing another running partner. After the race, we talked about what we thought of the course, how we handled the hills, and the people who were running around us. We grabbed some water and walked back to the registration area to get something to eat before finally deciding to go home. Again, that post-race interaction was the best part of the event today.

Racing is more social than running by yourself. Racing with friends is truly satisfying.
Today I ran the Central Pennsylvania Festival of the Arts 10K with a group of friends: Stevie and Nancy (from episode # 15), stomatology along with Stevie’s husband and son, abortion and Nancy’s neighbor. My friend Chris came as well to run the 5K race (his first race). So overall, it was a very nice sized “pack” to run with.

The weather forecast said that it would be in the 70’s with high humidity and a 40% chance of rain. It was definitely raining last night, but stopped by the time we got to the race registration area. I was really hoping for a light shower, but no such luck. Chris and I registered and then did some walking and stretching before the 10K race began — the 5K started 15 minutes later.

The race started at 8:30 with a downhill run for the first mile or so. As usual, I started off a little too quickly, but I was feeling strong and light, so it was hard to help myself. We ran across campus, across a building-bridge to the Penn State golf course, around half of the golf course and then hit a rather steep hill around mile 4. The hill and the heat slowed me down a bit at that point and I was passed by a few people. We went back across the bridge to campus, up another hill, and then a dash to the finish.

I think in the podcast, I had said something about expecting to run it in about 45:00, but that was an exaggeration. I haven’t done a 10K for a while and thought I would get something below 50 minutes. I finished in 49:46, which is an 8:02 pace.

But more than the race and my time, I think I most enjoyed cheering everyone else to the finish. I was very impressed by how everyone did, especially Chris, who finished the 5K in about 25 minutes. That’s very good for a first-time racer and it’s not too far off my pace, so I may be developing another running partner. After the race, we talked about what we thought of the course, how we handled the hills, and the people who were running around us. We grabbed some water and walked back to the registration area to get something to eat before finally deciding to go home. Again, that post-race interaction was the best part of the event today.

Racing is more social than running by yourself. Racing with friends is truly satisfying.
Jeff and I discuss the Flying Pig Marathon, drug
sick which we both completed today. We talk about our trip to Cincinnati, disorder
what we did in town yesterday, the race expo and Flying Pig swag, the start of the race, the people we met, crowd support, hydration, the problems that we both encountered, and other random thoughts. Leave a comment here at parkedthoughts.com or send Allan an e-mail at Allan@parkedthoughts.com
I swear this guy holds the key to world peace…

India is my favorite.

Hi All. I just wanted to write a post to send good thoughts to Miesha Marzell, stuff who we interviewed way back in episode #6. She is participating in the Olympic Trials now and her races are tomorrow. I don’t think it’s right to pray for someone to win, but I do hope that she runs a good race and doesn’t have any complications from illness or injury.
Jeff and I talk about our training in the heat, information pills inspirational stories from our listeners, discount and upcoming races. If you want to submit your own story, leave a comment at parkedthoughts.com or send it to allan@parkedthoughts.com or jeff@jsswain.com

Mentioned in this episode:

Today I ran the Central Pennsylvania Festival of the Arts 10K with a group of friends: Stevie and Nancy (from episode # 15), diagnosis along with Stevie’s husband and son, and Nancy’s neighbor. My friend Chris came as well to run the 5K race (his first race). So overall, it was a very nice sized “pack” to run with.

The weather forecast said that it would be in the 70’s with high humidity and a 40% chance of rain. It was definitely raining last night, but stopped by the time we got to the race registration area. I was really hoping for a light shower, but no such luck. Chris and I registered and then did some walking and stretching before the 10K race began — the 5K started 15 minutes later.

The race started at 8:30 with a downhill run for the first mile or so. As usual, I started off a little too quickly, but I was feeling strong and light, so it was hard to help myself. We ran across campus, across a building-bridge to the Penn State golf course, around half of the golf course and then hit a rather steep hill around mile 4. The hill and the heat slowed me down a bit at that point and I was passed by a few people. We went back across the bridge to campus, up another hill, and then a dash to the finish.

I think in the podcast, I had said something about expecting to run it in about 45:00, but that was an exaggeration. I haven’t done a 10K for a while and thought I would get something below 50 minutes. I finished in 49:46, which is an 8:02 pace.

But more than the race and my time, I think I most enjoyed cheering everyone else to the finish. I was very impressed by how everyone did, especially Chris, who finished the 5K in about 25 minutes. That’s very good for a first-time racer and it’s not too far off my pace, so I may be developing another running partner. After the race, we talked about what we thought of the course, how we handled the hills, and the people who were running around us. We grabbed some water and walked back to the registration area to get something to eat before finally deciding to go home. Again, that post-race interaction was the best part of the event today.

Racing is more social than running by yourself. Racing with friends is truly satisfying.
Normally I don’t travel far for a 5K race. I enjoy doing them, this but town where we live (State College, PA) and the surrounding towns have at least one 5K race most weekends between March and November. Today was a little different. I went to Holidaysburg, PA (about an hour away) with a group of women from the Nittany Valley Running Club to run the Sloppy Socks 5K. One of them had mentioned it on the club’s e-mail list and it sounded like fun. This 5K was not your typical road race.

Sloppy Socks 5K (before)

As you can see in the picture, the day started off with the usual early morning fog. It quickly burned off by the time they gathered the 150 or so runners for the 8:30 race start. This was the first annual running of this race, so no one was completely sure where it was going to take us. Fortunately, the race volunteers had marked the course with cones and little orange flags (the kind that utility workers often use to identify the path of underground cables and pipes). We also had a little time to scout out part of the course before starting. The race director made a few announcements and then handed the mic over to an assistant so he could find his place at the starting line.

Once the whistle was blown, we started out across a field. It instantly brought back memories of my old high school cross country days. I was happily running and reminiscing — until the still-packed group of runners around me hit the mud pit. There was no way around it. We had to jump down a couple of feet into a slimy mud pit. I’m not sure of the exact dimensions, but that was long enough that you couldn’t jump it and deep enough that everyone’s shoes filled with goo. So I jumped in with both feet and then made my way to the other side to climb out again and slosh onward.

Sloppy Socks 5K (All for one and one for all)

[Notice the change in our shoe color.]

We ran back onto the fields again for a while before heading back to a trail, over some fallen branches, and down into a creek bed. The course went down the creek bed across smooth (and slippery) stones, and then back up a steep embankment again. The course went back to the fields, into the woods again for a bit, and then back toward the starting. That was loop/mile one. We did the same course (including the same mud pit) two more times before taking the final path to the finish line. Speaking of the finish line, Cheryl, one of the club members, was the top woman finisher. I just met her today, but apparently she is no stranger to first place in normal road-running events.

I finished the course in about 25:34, which is a bad 5K time for me, but I really don’t care because 1) it was an obstacle course, 2) it seemed like it was longer than 3.1 miles, and 3) I had too much fun to let the clock bother me. Overall, I give this event a definite thumbs-up. I hope they have it again next year and I would be interested in doing similar events in the future.

Sloppy Socks 5K (after)
Normally I don’t travel far for a 5K race. I enjoy doing them, ailment but town where we live (State College, more info PA) and the surrounding towns have at least one 5K race most weekends between March and November. Today was a little different. I went to Holidaysburg, PA (about an hour away) with a group of women from the Nittany Valley Running Club to run the Sloppy Socks 5K. One of them had mentioned it on the club’s e-mail list and it sounded like fun. This 5K was not your typical road race.

Sloppy Socks 5K (before)

As you can see in the picture, the day started off with the usual early morning fog. It quickly burned off by the time they gathered the 150 or so runners for the 8:30 race start. This was the first annual running of this race, so no one was completely sure where it was going to take us. Fortunately, the race volunteers had marked the course with cones and little orange flags (the kind that utility workers often use to identify the path of underground cables and pipes). We also had a little time to scout out part of the course before starting. The race director made a few announcements and then handed the mic over to an assistant so he could find his place at the starting line.

Once the whistle was blown, we started out across a field. It instantly brought back memories of my old high school cross country days. I was happily running and reminiscing — until the still-packed group of runners around me hit the mud pit. There was no way around it. We had to jump down a couple of feet into a slimy mud pit. I’m not sure of the exact dimensions, but that was long enough that you couldn’t jump it and deep enough that everyone’s shoes filled with goo. So I jumped in with both feet and then made my way to the other side to climb out again and slosh onward.

Sloppy Socks 5K (All for one and one for all)

We ran back onto the fields again for a while before heading back to a trail, over some fallen branches, and down into a creek bed. The course went down the creek bed across smooth (and slippery) stones, and then back up a steep embankment again. The course went back to the fields, into the woods again for a bit, and then back toward the starting. That was loop/mile one. We did the same course (including the same mud pit) two more times before taking the final path to the finish line. Speaking of the finish line, Cheryl, one of the club members, was the top woman finisher. I just met her today, but apparently she is no stranger to first place in normal road-running events.

I finished the course in about 25:34, which is a bad 5K time for me, but I really don’t care because 1) it was an obstacle course, 2) it seemed like it was longer than 3.1 miles, and 3) I had too much fun to let the clock bother me. Overall, I give this event a definite thumbs-up. I hope they have it again next year and I would be interested in doing similar events in the future.

Sloppy Socks 5K (after)
Today I ran the Central Pennsylvania Festival of the Arts 10K with a group of friends: Stevie and Nancy (from episode # 15), stomatology along with Stevie’s husband and son, abortion and Nancy’s neighbor. My friend Chris came as well to run the 5K race (his first race). So overall, it was a very nice sized “pack” to run with.

The weather forecast said that it would be in the 70’s with high humidity and a 40% chance of rain. It was definitely raining last night, but stopped by the time we got to the race registration area. I was really hoping for a light shower, but no such luck. Chris and I registered and then did some walking and stretching before the 10K race began — the 5K started 15 minutes later.

The race started at 8:30 with a downhill run for the first mile or so. As usual, I started off a little too quickly, but I was feeling strong and light, so it was hard to help myself. We ran across campus, across a building-bridge to the Penn State golf course, around half of the golf course and then hit a rather steep hill around mile 4. The hill and the heat slowed me down a bit at that point and I was passed by a few people. We went back across the bridge to campus, up another hill, and then a dash to the finish.

I think in the podcast, I had said something about expecting to run it in about 45:00, but that was an exaggeration. I haven’t done a 10K for a while and thought I would get something below 50 minutes. I finished in 49:46, which is an 8:02 pace.

But more than the race and my time, I think I most enjoyed cheering everyone else to the finish. I was very impressed by how everyone did, especially Chris, who finished the 5K in about 25 minutes. That’s very good for a first-time racer and it’s not too far off my pace, so I may be developing another running partner. After the race, we talked about what we thought of the course, how we handled the hills, and the people who were running around us. We grabbed some water and walked back to the registration area to get something to eat before finally deciding to go home. Again, that post-race interaction was the best part of the event today.

Racing is more social than running by yourself. Racing with friends is truly satisfying.
Today I ran the Central Pennsylvania Festival of the Arts 10K with a group of friends: Stevie and Nancy (from episode # 15), stomatology along with Stevie’s husband and son, abortion and Nancy’s neighbor. My friend Chris came as well to run the 5K race (his first race). So overall, it was a very nice sized “pack” to run with.

The weather forecast said that it would be in the 70’s with high humidity and a 40% chance of rain. It was definitely raining last night, but stopped by the time we got to the race registration area. I was really hoping for a light shower, but no such luck. Chris and I registered and then did some walking and stretching before the 10K race began — the 5K started 15 minutes later.

The race started at 8:30 with a downhill run for the first mile or so. As usual, I started off a little too quickly, but I was feeling strong and light, so it was hard to help myself. We ran across campus, across a building-bridge to the Penn State golf course, around half of the golf course and then hit a rather steep hill around mile 4. The hill and the heat slowed me down a bit at that point and I was passed by a few people. We went back across the bridge to campus, up another hill, and then a dash to the finish.

I think in the podcast, I had said something about expecting to run it in about 45:00, but that was an exaggeration. I haven’t done a 10K for a while and thought I would get something below 50 minutes. I finished in 49:46, which is an 8:02 pace.

But more than the race and my time, I think I most enjoyed cheering everyone else to the finish. I was very impressed by how everyone did, especially Chris, who finished the 5K in about 25 minutes. That’s very good for a first-time racer and it’s not too far off my pace, so I may be developing another running partner. After the race, we talked about what we thought of the course, how we handled the hills, and the people who were running around us. We grabbed some water and walked back to the registration area to get something to eat before finally deciding to go home. Again, that post-race interaction was the best part of the event today.

Racing is more social than running by yourself. Racing with friends is truly satisfying.
Jeff and I discuss the Flying Pig Marathon, drug
sick which we both completed today. We talk about our trip to Cincinnati, disorder
what we did in town yesterday, the race expo and Flying Pig swag, the start of the race, the people we met, crowd support, hydration, the problems that we both encountered, and other random thoughts. Leave a comment here at parkedthoughts.com or send Allan an e-mail at Allan@parkedthoughts.com
I couldn’t sleep, viagra so I thought I’d write about the marathon to capture some sense of the day. This is in no particular order.

I’m very happy with how I did in the run. My first goal was to finish, which I did at 04:11:52 (clock time) or 04:07:30 (chip time as measured by the disposable RFID chip that was tied into my shoe). The difference between these is because it took a few minutes after starting the race to cross the starting line. Jeff and I were in line to use the port-a-johns until about 10 minutes before the start of the race. Then we moved to the start line and were able to get in with the 4:15 pace crowd (i.e. the people around us expected to take 4:15 to finish). So even after crossing the start line, we were barely moving above a walk and then had to pass a lot of other runners. Both of us jumped to the sidewalk several times to get around a wall of runners.

Speaking of the start, I got really emotional at the beginning, running through the streets of Philadelphia with 16,000 like-minded people and among a throng of well-wishers. They came out to cheer us on despite the cold temperatures and sprinkling rain. I felt the same way when I hit the 13.1 mile mark and they were cheering on the half-marathon participants and playing the Rocky theme song. Those times in particular gave me an overwhelming communal feeling, like being a small part of something big. Those crowds were at the end as well, but by mile 25-26, I was more focused pushing through to the end and seeing Andrew.

The whole day was pretty cold, but it didn’t really bother me. Andrew bought me a nice set of Undergear as an early birthday present, so I had nice socks, underwear, and a long sleeved t-shirt. I wore fleece gloves, a newish pair of running shorts, and a running jacket that I had picked up about a month ago. I also wore Sue Swain’s running shoes, which is a total tribute to my absent-mindedness. I had all of this technical gear and no shoes. Luckily, my feet are pretty small and Sue’s shoes were nearly big enough to be comfortable. But I’m not complaining. They got me through the distance and I don’t have a single blister.

In any case, the weather was in the 30’s and sprinkling on and off all day. But I had my gear that kept the wind and rain out and wicked the sweat out of the way. The jacket was nice because it had a couple of pockets where I put the gloves after mile 5 or so. After I was warmed up, I really didn’t need them. I also used the pockets to keep some of the PowerGel that they were handing out during the race if I didn’t want to eat it right away.

The race had a good number of water/gatoraid stations along the track, about every 2 miles or so. They were pretty crowded with runners darting in and out to get a mouthful of whatever they wanted. There were a lot of cups tossed to the ground (as expected), but that didn’t seem to be a hazzard. Actually, the water stations were the only times that I walked during the race. Toward the end, I would walk for a few steps as I drank Gatoraid, mostly so I wouldn’t choke on it. But as soon as it was down, I was off again. I drank at every water station to keep hydrated and had to stop once in some bushes to releave myself (as other men were doing). I felt bad for the women who had to wait in line for the occasional bank of port-a-johns, but some women were finding bushes as well. When you gotta go, you gotta go.

I have been having problems with my IT band for a few months, during the race, I wore a strap above my knee to keep the IT band in place. It worked very well and I only had a problem when I was at the water stops. Running over to the table and darting out of the way of runners who would suddenly stop or move put some torque on my knee and cause a sharp pain, but it went away in a couple of seconds.

During the run, I saw a lot of people walking or pulling off to the side of the course to stretch, several people with IT band straps that were identical to mine, a couple of people throwing up, a couple of people with bloody shirts (which can happen if a nipple or mole gets irritated by your shirt — I never had that problem), and some people who were clearly out of it. On the good side, there is a long stretch of the second half of the course where you can see the people coming the other way, so I got to see all of the top men and women running toward the finish line. I also got to see Jeff (my running partner) when I was around mile 18 and he was around 22. The highlight was really seeing Andrew after everything was done. I was happy, he was beaming. It meant a lot to me to have him there.

I’d like to do another marathon — maybe two a year. I wouldn’t do many things different, but here are a couple of ideas: 1) DON’T FORGET MY SHOES and 2) start further ahead at the starting line. That’s it really. I trained enough. I hydrated enough. I was mentally prepared. I was a good day and a good run.
I swear this guy holds the key to world peace…

India is my favorite.

Hi All. I just wanted to write a post to send good thoughts to Miesha Marzell, stuff who we interviewed way back in episode #6. She is participating in the Olympic Trials now and her races are tomorrow. I don’t think it’s right to pray for someone to win, but I do hope that she runs a good race and doesn’t have any complications from illness or injury.
Jeff and I talk about our training in the heat, information pills inspirational stories from our listeners, discount and upcoming races. If you want to submit your own story, leave a comment at parkedthoughts.com or send it to allan@parkedthoughts.com or jeff@jsswain.com

Mentioned in this episode:

Today I ran the Central Pennsylvania Festival of the Arts 10K with a group of friends: Stevie and Nancy (from episode # 15), diagnosis along with Stevie’s husband and son, and Nancy’s neighbor. My friend Chris came as well to run the 5K race (his first race). So overall, it was a very nice sized “pack” to run with.

The weather forecast said that it would be in the 70’s with high humidity and a 40% chance of rain. It was definitely raining last night, but stopped by the time we got to the race registration area. I was really hoping for a light shower, but no such luck. Chris and I registered and then did some walking and stretching before the 10K race began — the 5K started 15 minutes later.

The race started at 8:30 with a downhill run for the first mile or so. As usual, I started off a little too quickly, but I was feeling strong and light, so it was hard to help myself. We ran across campus, across a building-bridge to the Penn State golf course, around half of the golf course and then hit a rather steep hill around mile 4. The hill and the heat slowed me down a bit at that point and I was passed by a few people. We went back across the bridge to campus, up another hill, and then a dash to the finish.

I think in the podcast, I had said something about expecting to run it in about 45:00, but that was an exaggeration. I haven’t done a 10K for a while and thought I would get something below 50 minutes. I finished in 49:46, which is an 8:02 pace.

But more than the race and my time, I think I most enjoyed cheering everyone else to the finish. I was very impressed by how everyone did, especially Chris, who finished the 5K in about 25 minutes. That’s very good for a first-time racer and it’s not too far off my pace, so I may be developing another running partner. After the race, we talked about what we thought of the course, how we handled the hills, and the people who were running around us. We grabbed some water and walked back to the registration area to get something to eat before finally deciding to go home. Again, that post-race interaction was the best part of the event today.

Racing is more social than running by yourself. Racing with friends is truly satisfying.
Normally I don’t travel far for a 5K race. I enjoy doing them, this but town where we live (State College, PA) and the surrounding towns have at least one 5K race most weekends between March and November. Today was a little different. I went to Holidaysburg, PA (about an hour away) with a group of women from the Nittany Valley Running Club to run the Sloppy Socks 5K. One of them had mentioned it on the club’s e-mail list and it sounded like fun. This 5K was not your typical road race.

Sloppy Socks 5K (before)

As you can see in the picture, the day started off with the usual early morning fog. It quickly burned off by the time they gathered the 150 or so runners for the 8:30 race start. This was the first annual running of this race, so no one was completely sure where it was going to take us. Fortunately, the race volunteers had marked the course with cones and little orange flags (the kind that utility workers often use to identify the path of underground cables and pipes). We also had a little time to scout out part of the course before starting. The race director made a few announcements and then handed the mic over to an assistant so he could find his place at the starting line.

Once the whistle was blown, we started out across a field. It instantly brought back memories of my old high school cross country days. I was happily running and reminiscing — until the still-packed group of runners around me hit the mud pit. There was no way around it. We had to jump down a couple of feet into a slimy mud pit. I’m not sure of the exact dimensions, but that was long enough that you couldn’t jump it and deep enough that everyone’s shoes filled with goo. So I jumped in with both feet and then made my way to the other side to climb out again and slosh onward.

Sloppy Socks 5K (All for one and one for all)

[Notice the change in our shoe color.]

We ran back onto the fields again for a while before heading back to a trail, over some fallen branches, and down into a creek bed. The course went down the creek bed across smooth (and slippery) stones, and then back up a steep embankment again. The course went back to the fields, into the woods again for a bit, and then back toward the starting. That was loop/mile one. We did the same course (including the same mud pit) two more times before taking the final path to the finish line. Speaking of the finish line, Cheryl, one of the club members, was the top woman finisher. I just met her today, but apparently she is no stranger to first place in normal road-running events.

I finished the course in about 25:34, which is a bad 5K time for me, but I really don’t care because 1) it was an obstacle course, 2) it seemed like it was longer than 3.1 miles, and 3) I had too much fun to let the clock bother me. Overall, I give this event a definite thumbs-up. I hope they have it again next year and I would be interested in doing similar events in the future.

Sloppy Socks 5K (after)
Normally I don’t travel far for a 5K race. I enjoy doing them, ailment but town where we live (State College, more info PA) and the surrounding towns have at least one 5K race most weekends between March and November. Today was a little different. I went to Holidaysburg, PA (about an hour away) with a group of women from the Nittany Valley Running Club to run the Sloppy Socks 5K. One of them had mentioned it on the club’s e-mail list and it sounded like fun. This 5K was not your typical road race.

Sloppy Socks 5K (before)

As you can see in the picture, the day started off with the usual early morning fog. It quickly burned off by the time they gathered the 150 or so runners for the 8:30 race start. This was the first annual running of this race, so no one was completely sure where it was going to take us. Fortunately, the race volunteers had marked the course with cones and little orange flags (the kind that utility workers often use to identify the path of underground cables and pipes). We also had a little time to scout out part of the course before starting. The race director made a few announcements and then handed the mic over to an assistant so he could find his place at the starting line.

Once the whistle was blown, we started out across a field. It instantly brought back memories of my old high school cross country days. I was happily running and reminiscing — until the still-packed group of runners around me hit the mud pit. There was no way around it. We had to jump down a couple of feet into a slimy mud pit. I’m not sure of the exact dimensions, but that was long enough that you couldn’t jump it and deep enough that everyone’s shoes filled with goo. So I jumped in with both feet and then made my way to the other side to climb out again and slosh onward.

Sloppy Socks 5K (All for one and one for all)

We ran back onto the fields again for a while before heading back to a trail, over some fallen branches, and down into a creek bed. The course went down the creek bed across smooth (and slippery) stones, and then back up a steep embankment again. The course went back to the fields, into the woods again for a bit, and then back toward the starting. That was loop/mile one. We did the same course (including the same mud pit) two more times before taking the final path to the finish line. Speaking of the finish line, Cheryl, one of the club members, was the top woman finisher. I just met her today, but apparently she is no stranger to first place in normal road-running events.

I finished the course in about 25:34, which is a bad 5K time for me, but I really don’t care because 1) it was an obstacle course, 2) it seemed like it was longer than 3.1 miles, and 3) I had too much fun to let the clock bother me. Overall, I give this event a definite thumbs-up. I hope they have it again next year and I would be interested in doing similar events in the future.

Sloppy Socks 5K (after)
Today I ran the Central Pennsylvania Festival of the Arts 10K with a group of friends: Stevie and Nancy (from episode # 15), stomatology along with Stevie’s husband and son, abortion and Nancy’s neighbor. My friend Chris came as well to run the 5K race (his first race). So overall, it was a very nice sized “pack” to run with.

The weather forecast said that it would be in the 70’s with high humidity and a 40% chance of rain. It was definitely raining last night, but stopped by the time we got to the race registration area. I was really hoping for a light shower, but no such luck. Chris and I registered and then did some walking and stretching before the 10K race began — the 5K started 15 minutes later.

The race started at 8:30 with a downhill run for the first mile or so. As usual, I started off a little too quickly, but I was feeling strong and light, so it was hard to help myself. We ran across campus, across a building-bridge to the Penn State golf course, around half of the golf course and then hit a rather steep hill around mile 4. The hill and the heat slowed me down a bit at that point and I was passed by a few people. We went back across the bridge to campus, up another hill, and then a dash to the finish.

I think in the podcast, I had said something about expecting to run it in about 45:00, but that was an exaggeration. I haven’t done a 10K for a while and thought I would get something below 50 minutes. I finished in 49:46, which is an 8:02 pace.

But more than the race and my time, I think I most enjoyed cheering everyone else to the finish. I was very impressed by how everyone did, especially Chris, who finished the 5K in about 25 minutes. That’s very good for a first-time racer and it’s not too far off my pace, so I may be developing another running partner. After the race, we talked about what we thought of the course, how we handled the hills, and the people who were running around us. We grabbed some water and walked back to the registration area to get something to eat before finally deciding to go home. Again, that post-race interaction was the best part of the event today.

Racing is more social than running by yourself. Racing with friends is truly satisfying.
Today I ran the Central Pennsylvania Festival of the Arts 10K with a group of friends: Stevie and Nancy (from episode # 15), stomatology along with Stevie’s husband and son, abortion and Nancy’s neighbor. My friend Chris came as well to run the 5K race (his first race). So overall, it was a very nice sized “pack” to run with.

The weather forecast said that it would be in the 70’s with high humidity and a 40% chance of rain. It was definitely raining last night, but stopped by the time we got to the race registration area. I was really hoping for a light shower, but no such luck. Chris and I registered and then did some walking and stretching before the 10K race began — the 5K started 15 minutes later.

The race started at 8:30 with a downhill run for the first mile or so. As usual, I started off a little too quickly, but I was feeling strong and light, so it was hard to help myself. We ran across campus, across a building-bridge to the Penn State golf course, around half of the golf course and then hit a rather steep hill around mile 4. The hill and the heat slowed me down a bit at that point and I was passed by a few people. We went back across the bridge to campus, up another hill, and then a dash to the finish.

I think in the podcast, I had said something about expecting to run it in about 45:00, but that was an exaggeration. I haven’t done a 10K for a while and thought I would get something below 50 minutes. I finished in 49:46, which is an 8:02 pace.

But more than the race and my time, I think I most enjoyed cheering everyone else to the finish. I was very impressed by how everyone did, especially Chris, who finished the 5K in about 25 minutes. That’s very good for a first-time racer and it’s not too far off my pace, so I may be developing another running partner. After the race, we talked about what we thought of the course, how we handled the hills, and the people who were running around us. We grabbed some water and walked back to the registration area to get something to eat before finally deciding to go home. Again, that post-race interaction was the best part of the event today.

Racing is more social than running by yourself. Racing with friends is truly satisfying.
Jeff and I discuss the Flying Pig Marathon, drug
sick which we both completed today. We talk about our trip to Cincinnati, disorder
what we did in town yesterday, the race expo and Flying Pig swag, the start of the race, the people we met, crowd support, hydration, the problems that we both encountered, and other random thoughts. Leave a comment here at parkedthoughts.com or send Allan an e-mail at Allan@parkedthoughts.com
I couldn’t sleep, viagra so I thought I’d write about the marathon to capture some sense of the day. This is in no particular order.

I’m very happy with how I did in the run. My first goal was to finish, which I did at 04:11:52 (clock time) or 04:07:30 (chip time as measured by the disposable RFID chip that was tied into my shoe). The difference between these is because it took a few minutes after starting the race to cross the starting line. Jeff and I were in line to use the port-a-johns until about 10 minutes before the start of the race. Then we moved to the start line and were able to get in with the 4:15 pace crowd (i.e. the people around us expected to take 4:15 to finish). So even after crossing the start line, we were barely moving above a walk and then had to pass a lot of other runners. Both of us jumped to the sidewalk several times to get around a wall of runners.

Speaking of the start, I got really emotional at the beginning, running through the streets of Philadelphia with 16,000 like-minded people and among a throng of well-wishers. They came out to cheer us on despite the cold temperatures and sprinkling rain. I felt the same way when I hit the 13.1 mile mark and they were cheering on the half-marathon participants and playing the Rocky theme song. Those times in particular gave me an overwhelming communal feeling, like being a small part of something big. Those crowds were at the end as well, but by mile 25-26, I was more focused pushing through to the end and seeing Andrew.

The whole day was pretty cold, but it didn’t really bother me. Andrew bought me a nice set of Undergear as an early birthday present, so I had nice socks, underwear, and a long sleeved t-shirt. I wore fleece gloves, a newish pair of running shorts, and a running jacket that I had picked up about a month ago. I also wore Sue Swain’s running shoes, which is a total tribute to my absent-mindedness. I had all of this technical gear and no shoes. Luckily, my feet are pretty small and Sue’s shoes were nearly big enough to be comfortable. But I’m not complaining. They got me through the distance and I don’t have a single blister.

In any case, the weather was in the 30’s and sprinkling on and off all day. But I had my gear that kept the wind and rain out and wicked the sweat out of the way. The jacket was nice because it had a couple of pockets where I put the gloves after mile 5 or so. After I was warmed up, I really didn’t need them. I also used the pockets to keep some of the PowerGel that they were handing out during the race if I didn’t want to eat it right away.

The race had a good number of water/gatoraid stations along the track, about every 2 miles or so. They were pretty crowded with runners darting in and out to get a mouthful of whatever they wanted. There were a lot of cups tossed to the ground (as expected), but that didn’t seem to be a hazzard. Actually, the water stations were the only times that I walked during the race. Toward the end, I would walk for a few steps as I drank Gatoraid, mostly so I wouldn’t choke on it. But as soon as it was down, I was off again. I drank at every water station to keep hydrated and had to stop once in some bushes to releave myself (as other men were doing). I felt bad for the women who had to wait in line for the occasional bank of port-a-johns, but some women were finding bushes as well. When you gotta go, you gotta go.

I have been having problems with my IT band for a few months, during the race, I wore a strap above my knee to keep the IT band in place. It worked very well and I only had a problem when I was at the water stops. Running over to the table and darting out of the way of runners who would suddenly stop or move put some torque on my knee and cause a sharp pain, but it went away in a couple of seconds.

During the run, I saw a lot of people walking or pulling off to the side of the course to stretch, several people with IT band straps that were identical to mine, a couple of people throwing up, a couple of people with bloody shirts (which can happen if a nipple or mole gets irritated by your shirt — I never had that problem), and some people who were clearly out of it. On the good side, there is a long stretch of the second half of the course where you can see the people coming the other way, so I got to see all of the top men and women running toward the finish line. I also got to see Jeff (my running partner) when I was around mile 18 and he was around 22. The highlight was really seeing Andrew after everything was done. I was happy, he was beaming. It meant a lot to me to have him there.

I’d like to do another marathon — maybe two a year. I wouldn’t do many things different, but here are a couple of ideas: 1) DON’T FORGET MY SHOES and 2) start further ahead at the starting line. That’s it really. I trained enough. I hydrated enough. I was mentally prepared. I was a good day and a good run.
I couldn’t sleep, viagra so I thought I’d write about the marathon to capture some sense of the day. This is in no particular order.

I’m very happy with how I did in the run. My first goal was to finish, which I did at 04:11:52 (clock time) or 04:07:30 (chip time as measured by the disposable RFID chip that was tied into my shoe). The difference between these is because it took a few minutes after starting the race to cross the starting line. Jeff and I were in line to use the port-a-johns until about 10 minutes before the start of the race. Then we moved to the start line and were able to get in with the 4:15 pace crowd (i.e. the people around us expected to take 4:15 to finish). So even after crossing the start line, we were barely moving above a walk and then had to pass a lot of other runners. Both of us jumped to the sidewalk several times to get around a wall of runners.

Speaking of the start, I got really emotional at the beginning, running through the streets of Philadelphia with 16,000 like-minded people and among a throng of well-wishers. They came out to cheer us on despite the cold temperatures and sprinkling rain. I felt the same way when I hit the 13.1 mile mark and they were cheering on the half-marathon participants and playing the Rocky theme song. Those times in particular gave me an overwhelming communal feeling, like being a small part of something big. Those crowds were at the end as well, but by mile 25-26, I was more focused pushing through to the end and seeing Andrew.

The whole day was pretty cold, but it didn’t really bother me. Andrew bought me a nice set of Undergear as an early birthday present, so I had nice socks, underwear, and a long sleeved t-shirt. I wore fleece gloves, a newish pair of running shorts, and a running jacket that I had picked up about a month ago. I also wore Sue Swain’s running shoes, which is a total tribute to my absent-mindedness. I had all of this technical gear and no shoes. Luckily, my feet are pretty small and Sue’s shoes were nearly big enough to be comfortable. But I’m not complaining. They got me through the distance and I don’t have a single blister.

In any case, the weather was in the 30’s and sprinkling on and off all day. But I had my gear that kept the wind and rain out and wicked the sweat out of the way. The jacket was nice because it had a couple of pockets where I put the gloves after mile 5 or so. After I was warmed up, I really didn’t need them. I also used the pockets to keep some of the PowerGel that they were handing out during the race if I didn’t want to eat it right away.

The race had a good number of water/gatoraid stations along the track, about every 2 miles or so. They were pretty crowded with runners darting in and out to get a mouthful of whatever they wanted. There were a lot of cups tossed to the ground (as expected), but that didn’t seem to be a hazzard. Actually, the water stations were the only times that I walked during the race. Toward the end, I would walk for a few steps as I drank Gatoraid, mostly so I wouldn’t choke on it. But as soon as it was down, I was off again. I drank at every water station to keep hydrated and had to stop once in some bushes to releave myself (as other men were doing). I felt bad for the women who had to wait in line for the occasional bank of port-a-johns, but some women were finding bushes as well. When you gotta go, you gotta go.

I have been having problems with my IT band for a few months, during the race, I wore a strap above my knee to keep the IT band in place. It worked very well and I only had a problem when I was at the water stops. Running over to the table and darting out of the way of runners who would suddenly stop or move put some torque on my knee and cause a sharp pain, but it went away in a couple of seconds.

During the run, I saw a lot of people walking or pulling off to the side of the course to stretch, several people with IT band straps that were identical to mine, a couple of people throwing up, a couple of people with bloody shirts (which can happen if a nipple or mole gets irritated by your shirt — I never had that problem), and some people who were clearly out of it. On the good side, there is a long stretch of the second half of the course where you can see the people coming the other way, so I got to see all of the top men and women running toward the finish line. I also got to see Jeff (my running partner) when I was around mile 18 and he was around 22. The highlight was really seeing Andrew after everything was done. I was happy, he was beaming. It meant a lot to me to have him there.

I’d like to do another marathon — maybe two a year. I wouldn’t do many things different, but here are a couple of ideas: 1) DON’T FORGET MY SHOES and 2) start further ahead at the starting line. That’s it really. I trained enough. I hydrated enough. I was mentally prepared. I was a good day and a good run.
This week, angina
I did the podcast solo and talked about the Arts Festival 10K, rubella
the first annual Sloppy Socks 5K, ideas for turning a solo podcast into a group podcast, running fuel (including the ideas behind e-Gels), and Buckeye Outdoors (free online training log).

Related Sites:

This entry was posted in podcasting, running. Bookmark the permalink.

9 Responses to Running with the Pack 17: Arts Fest, Sloppy Socks, Solo Podcasting, Fuel, and Buckeye Outdoors

  1. garyd says:

    Allan – just listened to the podcast. Sounds like you’ve been able to get in some races! The muddy run sound like a lot of fun and I will say that my favorite marathon (from total experience point of view) was the Tecumseh Trail Marathon outside Bloomington, Indiana. Tough, Messy and fun.

    Follow up to egel. I appreciate the mention of my blog and of the links through my site. Just to clear up a point about the product that you made in the podcast. The egel’s actually don’t have any protein in them.. they are strictly a electrolyte / calorie item. But as the site says, that eliminates having to use gel’s and sports drinks. There are other products now that try and simulate the egel idea, like 4x sodium powergels… I still like the taste/consistency of the egels.

    Also, thanks for mentioning the book too. I hope that it is helpful, just ask if you have any questions.

    Try Yoga! I think you’ll like it.

  2. Mike W. says:

    Allan,

    Just listened to your latest podcast, I haven’t dropped you and Jeff a note in awhile but my thanks to both of you, each podcast is a welcome distraction.

    You do need to try a trail marathon and beyond, I think you will look at roads differently if you do. I have now done two 50k trail races and they are a blast and am contemplating a 50 miler in September. Given a choice, I may never do a marathon event. The only drawback for some on trails is the lack of fans and they usually only have 50-150 runners, which for me is more enjoyable.

    Another product you may want to look at as you go longer distances are S-Caps (www.succeed.com) or E-Caps (www.hammer.com), they are basically evolved salt pills and they help keep your electrolytes in balance. Since I have used them, I have now gotten through multiple hot weather events without incidence. I was plagued with stomach cramps and/or bloating and these combined with the electrolyte drink (Clif Shot – Apple) I use have suited me quite well. I may look

    Thanks once again for the great podcasts.

    Mike

  3. Allan says:

    Gary, I tried two eGels on a 16-miler last night and I really liked them a lot. I had ordered a variety pack and tried the tropical and strawberry flavors. They went down very easily and didn’t upset my stomach as some other gels have done. I thought they had protein in them because they mention having amino acids, but I guess not. I think I’m sold on them.

    Mike, I just got some nuun tablets from Zombierunner.com along with some other items. I haven’t tried them out yet, but I’m hoping they’ll taste okay and help me hydrate on days where I don’t actually need the extra calories — or when I just need a break from the sugar. I also got some ginger chews, two hand-held water bottles, a hammer gel, and a cool-off bandana from Zombie Runner. I actually like how they sell items in small quantities. It makes it easy to give something a try.

    I do have some concerns about the long term health effects of training for ultras, especially since I tend to do my distance runs on pavement. I have a fiend, Beth, who has been trying to get people do to trail running with her, so I may take her up on it next weekend and see how it goes. I’ve mentioned on the podcast how I’ve always enjoyed running around the woods. So ultimately, it may be: trail running, yes; ultrarunning: no. I’ve been talking to Brandon Wood about doing a triathlon some day, but I don’t think I can afford the bike equipment anytime soon.

    Thanks for listening and writing in Mike. Gary: Thanks again for all of the advice and for podcasting. I’m working on a wiki site based on Running with the Pack stuff. I just added something today about the eGels and your podcast.

  4. Marty says:

    Hi,
    I am really enjoying each episode. I am still drawing many parallels between your journey and mine. I just wanted to comment and caution about the main ingredient in Nuun. It is sorbitol, to much sorbitol and it has laxative effects. Let’s just say sugar free gummi bears are sweetened with Sorbitol and I once ate a package and the only running I was doing…no need to continue. Sorbitol is OK in small amounts, but I wouldn’t want to find out what that limit is miles out on a country road.

    Keep up the great, entertaining and informative podcasts.

    Thanks,
    Marty

  5. Crurbshus says:

    UxsWcwDzrCpu ナイキ KysOfjFzsClg ナイキシューズ YlbBtiNcqAwh スニーカー nike ZqlTzjElxDzk ナイキランニング MigVftXcaNlh ナイキ air HaaGstFelAmm ナイキ フリー DmyDpdEuhPkf nike VehBmwMciMxq nike air VurSaaImhVoe nike VobLpcPdjLkr

  6. Crurbshus says:

    #random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z] {ナイキシューズ|シューズナイキ|nike シューズ} #random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z] {ナイキスニーカー|スニーカーナイキ|スニーカー nike|nike スニーカー} #random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z] {ナイキランニング|nike ランニング|ナイキ} #random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z] {free nike|nike free|ナイキ フリー} #random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z] {free nike|nike free|nike} #random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z] {ナイキスニーカー|スニーカーナイキ|ナイキ} #random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z] {スニーカー nike|nike スニーカー|nike} #random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z] {nike スニーカー|スニーカー nike|ナイキシューズ] #random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z] <a href="http:/ /http://nike-nike-n.webnode.jp/” / rel=”nofollow”>{スニーカーナイキ|ナイキスニーカー|シューズナイキ} #random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]

  7. Crurbshus says:

    #random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z] {ナイキシューズ|シューズナイキ|nike シューズ} #random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z] {ナイキスニーカー|スニーカーナイキ|スニーカー nike|nike スニーカー} #random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z] {ナイキランニング|nike ランニング|ナイキ} #random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z] {free nike|nike free|ナイキ フリー} #random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z] {free nike|nike free|nike} #random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z] {ナイキスニーカー|スニーカーナイキ|ナイキ} #random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z] {スニーカー nike|nike スニーカー|nike} #random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z] {nike スニーカー|スニーカー nike|ナイキシューズ] #random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z] <a href="http:/ /http://nike-nike-n.webnode.jp/” / rel=”nofollow”>{スニーカーナイキ|ナイキスニーカー|シューズナイキ} #random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]

  8. Crurbshus says:

    #random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z] {ナイキシューズ|シューズナイキ|nike シューズ} #random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z] {ナイキスニーカー|スニーカーナイキ|スニーカー nike|nike スニーカー} #random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z] {ナイキランニング|nike ランニング|ナイキ} #random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z] {free nike|nike free|ナイキ フリー} #random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z] {free nike|nike free|nike} #random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z] {ナイキスニーカー|スニーカーナイキ|ナイキ} #random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z] {スニーカー nike|nike スニーカー|nike} #random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z] {nike スニーカー|スニーカー nike|ナイキシューズ] #random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z] <a href="http:/ /http://nike-nike-n.webnode.jp/” / rel=”nofollow”>{スニーカーナイキ|ナイキスニーカー|シューズナイキ} #random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]

  9. Crurbshus says:

    #random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z] {ナイキシューズ|シューズナイキ|nike シューズ} #random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z] {ナイキスニーカー|スニーカーナイキ|スニーカー nike|nike スニーカー} #random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z] {ナイキランニング|nike ランニング|ナイキ} #random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z] {free nike|nike free|ナイキ フリー} #random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z] {free nike|nike free|nike} #random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z] {ナイキスニーカー|スニーカーナイキ|ナイキ} #random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z] {スニーカー nike|nike スニーカー|nike} #random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z] {nike スニーカー|スニーカー nike|ナイキシューズ] #random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z] <a href="http:/ /http://nike-nike-n.webnode.jp/” / rel=”nofollow”>{スニーカーナイキ|ナイキスニーカー|シューズナイキ} #random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]#random.Z]#random.z]#random.z]