Category Archives: iPhone

Running with the Pack 155: Zombies Run 2, 100 Miles Per Month Challenge, and More

Stevie and I give some fueling advice to someone planning her first half marathon.  I talk about my switch to running before going to work.  Stevie talks about learning to accept walking as part of her running.  We also talk about McDonalds and their healthier Happy Meals.
Stevie and I give some fueling advice to someone planning her first half marathon.  I talk about my switch to running before going to work.  Stevie talks about learning to accept walking as part of her running.  We also talk about McDonalds and their healthier Happy Meals.
Stevie and I talk about protecting yourself from the summer sun, sanitary Stevie’s recent run of the Komen 5K, grip and then we focus on some guidelines for race reports before playing a bunch of calls. Here are the guidelines:

  • Keep the call under 3 minutes since that’s the limit with Google Voice
  • Focus on the highs and lows
  • Mention anything that makes this race unique

Stevie and I give some fueling advice to someone planning her first half marathon.  I talk about my switch to running before going to work.  Stevie talks about learning to accept walking as part of her running.  We also talk about McDonalds and their healthier Happy Meals.
Stevie and I talk about protecting yourself from the summer sun, sanitary Stevie’s recent run of the Komen 5K, grip and then we focus on some guidelines for race reports before playing a bunch of calls. Here are the guidelines:

  • Keep the call under 3 minutes since that’s the limit with Google Voice
  • Focus on the highs and lows
  • Mention anything that makes this race unique

It’s a call-in show! This week we got caught up with all of the race reports: two about the Broad Street Run in Philadelphia, see two first-time triathletes, a 100 mile ultramarathon, a touching story from a race voluneteer, and more. We actually got a question this time!
Stevie and I give some fueling advice to someone planning her first half marathon.  I talk about my switch to running before going to work.  Stevie talks about learning to accept walking as part of her running.  We also talk about McDonalds and their healthier Happy Meals.
Stevie and I talk about protecting yourself from the summer sun, sanitary Stevie’s recent run of the Komen 5K, grip and then we focus on some guidelines for race reports before playing a bunch of calls. Here are the guidelines:

  • Keep the call under 3 minutes since that’s the limit with Google Voice
  • Focus on the highs and lows
  • Mention anything that makes this race unique

It’s a call-in show! This week we got caught up with all of the race reports: two about the Broad Street Run in Philadelphia, see two first-time triathletes, a 100 mile ultramarathon, a touching story from a race voluneteer, and more. We actually got a question this time!
It’s a call-in show! This week we got caught up with all of the race reports: two about the Broad Street Run in Philadelphia, see two first-time triathletes, a 100 mile ultramarathon, a touching story from a race voluneteer, and more. We actually got a question this time!
This week, order
Stevie talks about her plans to run three 5K races in one weekend and her thoughts about going gluten-free.  I have the Johnstown Half-Marathon this weekend.  We also talk about some reviews of the Tower of Terror 10-miler and take some calls.
Stevie and I give some fueling advice to someone planning her first half marathon.  I talk about my switch to running before going to work.  Stevie talks about learning to accept walking as part of her running.  We also talk about McDonalds and their healthier Happy Meals.
Stevie and I talk about protecting yourself from the summer sun, sanitary Stevie’s recent run of the Komen 5K, grip and then we focus on some guidelines for race reports before playing a bunch of calls. Here are the guidelines:

  • Keep the call under 3 minutes since that’s the limit with Google Voice
  • Focus on the highs and lows
  • Mention anything that makes this race unique

It’s a call-in show! This week we got caught up with all of the race reports: two about the Broad Street Run in Philadelphia, see two first-time triathletes, a 100 mile ultramarathon, a touching story from a race voluneteer, and more. We actually got a question this time!
It’s a call-in show! This week we got caught up with all of the race reports: two about the Broad Street Run in Philadelphia, see two first-time triathletes, a 100 mile ultramarathon, a touching story from a race voluneteer, and more. We actually got a question this time!
This week, order
Stevie talks about her plans to run three 5K races in one weekend and her thoughts about going gluten-free.  I have the Johnstown Half-Marathon this weekend.  We also talk about some reviews of the Tower of Terror 10-miler and take some calls.
It’s a call-in show! This week we got caught up with all of the race reports: two about the Broad Street Run in Philadelphia, see two first-time triathletes, a 100 mile ultramarathon, a touching story from a race voluneteer, and more. We actually got a question this time!
This week, order
Stevie talks about her plans to run three 5K races in one weekend and her thoughts about going gluten-free.  I have the Johnstown Half-Marathon this weekend.  We also talk about some reviews of the Tower of Terror 10-miler and take some calls.
Stevie and I talk about getting out of a running funk, refractionist
the release of Zombies, Run! on Android, and Stevie jumping back on the Weight Watchers bandwagon.  Of course some wonderful calls at the end!
Stevie and I give some fueling advice to someone planning her first half marathon.  I talk about my switch to running before going to work.  Stevie talks about learning to accept walking as part of her running.  We also talk about McDonalds and their healthier Happy Meals.
Stevie and I talk about protecting yourself from the summer sun, sanitary Stevie’s recent run of the Komen 5K, grip and then we focus on some guidelines for race reports before playing a bunch of calls. Here are the guidelines:

  • Keep the call under 3 minutes since that’s the limit with Google Voice
  • Focus on the highs and lows
  • Mention anything that makes this race unique

It’s a call-in show! This week we got caught up with all of the race reports: two about the Broad Street Run in Philadelphia, see two first-time triathletes, a 100 mile ultramarathon, a touching story from a race voluneteer, and more. We actually got a question this time!
It’s a call-in show! This week we got caught up with all of the race reports: two about the Broad Street Run in Philadelphia, see two first-time triathletes, a 100 mile ultramarathon, a touching story from a race voluneteer, and more. We actually got a question this time!
This week, order
Stevie talks about her plans to run three 5K races in one weekend and her thoughts about going gluten-free.  I have the Johnstown Half-Marathon this weekend.  We also talk about some reviews of the Tower of Terror 10-miler and take some calls.
It’s a call-in show! This week we got caught up with all of the race reports: two about the Broad Street Run in Philadelphia, see two first-time triathletes, a 100 mile ultramarathon, a touching story from a race voluneteer, and more. We actually got a question this time!
This week, order
Stevie talks about her plans to run three 5K races in one weekend and her thoughts about going gluten-free.  I have the Johnstown Half-Marathon this weekend.  We also talk about some reviews of the Tower of Terror 10-miler and take some calls.
Stevie and I talk about getting out of a running funk, refractionist
the release of Zombies, Run! on Android, and Stevie jumping back on the Weight Watchers bandwagon.  Of course some wonderful calls at the end!
This week, sovaldi we talk about using a run/walk as a strategy, drugs especially in the heat, Stevie’s cruise, and more about Zombies, Run on Android.  Lots of listener calls as well.
Stevie and I give some fueling advice to someone planning her first half marathon.  I talk about my switch to running before going to work.  Stevie talks about learning to accept walking as part of her running.  We also talk about McDonalds and their healthier Happy Meals.
Stevie and I talk about protecting yourself from the summer sun, sanitary Stevie’s recent run of the Komen 5K, grip and then we focus on some guidelines for race reports before playing a bunch of calls. Here are the guidelines:

  • Keep the call under 3 minutes since that’s the limit with Google Voice
  • Focus on the highs and lows
  • Mention anything that makes this race unique

It’s a call-in show! This week we got caught up with all of the race reports: two about the Broad Street Run in Philadelphia, see two first-time triathletes, a 100 mile ultramarathon, a touching story from a race voluneteer, and more. We actually got a question this time!
It’s a call-in show! This week we got caught up with all of the race reports: two about the Broad Street Run in Philadelphia, see two first-time triathletes, a 100 mile ultramarathon, a touching story from a race voluneteer, and more. We actually got a question this time!
This week, order
Stevie talks about her plans to run three 5K races in one weekend and her thoughts about going gluten-free.  I have the Johnstown Half-Marathon this weekend.  We also talk about some reviews of the Tower of Terror 10-miler and take some calls.
It’s a call-in show! This week we got caught up with all of the race reports: two about the Broad Street Run in Philadelphia, see two first-time triathletes, a 100 mile ultramarathon, a touching story from a race voluneteer, and more. We actually got a question this time!
This week, order
Stevie talks about her plans to run three 5K races in one weekend and her thoughts about going gluten-free.  I have the Johnstown Half-Marathon this weekend.  We also talk about some reviews of the Tower of Terror 10-miler and take some calls.
Stevie and I talk about getting out of a running funk, refractionist
the release of Zombies, Run! on Android, and Stevie jumping back on the Weight Watchers bandwagon.  Of course some wonderful calls at the end!
This week, sovaldi we talk about using a run/walk as a strategy, drugs especially in the heat, Stevie’s cruise, and more about Zombies, Run on Android.  Lots of listener calls as well.
This week, sovaldi we talk about using a run/walk as a strategy, drugs especially in the heat, Stevie’s cruise, and more about Zombies, Run on Android.  Lots of listener calls as well.
We discuss my recent return to the swimming pool, treatment
Stevie running on the beach while on vacation, public health
and enjoying the Summer Olympics.  Then we get caught up with some listener calls including a question about running two marathons two weeks apart.
Stevie and I give some fueling advice to someone planning her first half marathon.  I talk about my switch to running before going to work.  Stevie talks about learning to accept walking as part of her running.  We also talk about McDonalds and their healthier Happy Meals.
Stevie and I talk about protecting yourself from the summer sun, sanitary Stevie’s recent run of the Komen 5K, grip and then we focus on some guidelines for race reports before playing a bunch of calls. Here are the guidelines:

  • Keep the call under 3 minutes since that’s the limit with Google Voice
  • Focus on the highs and lows
  • Mention anything that makes this race unique

It’s a call-in show! This week we got caught up with all of the race reports: two about the Broad Street Run in Philadelphia, see two first-time triathletes, a 100 mile ultramarathon, a touching story from a race voluneteer, and more. We actually got a question this time!
It’s a call-in show! This week we got caught up with all of the race reports: two about the Broad Street Run in Philadelphia, see two first-time triathletes, a 100 mile ultramarathon, a touching story from a race voluneteer, and more. We actually got a question this time!
This week, order
Stevie talks about her plans to run three 5K races in one weekend and her thoughts about going gluten-free.  I have the Johnstown Half-Marathon this weekend.  We also talk about some reviews of the Tower of Terror 10-miler and take some calls.
It’s a call-in show! This week we got caught up with all of the race reports: two about the Broad Street Run in Philadelphia, see two first-time triathletes, a 100 mile ultramarathon, a touching story from a race voluneteer, and more. We actually got a question this time!
This week, order
Stevie talks about her plans to run three 5K races in one weekend and her thoughts about going gluten-free.  I have the Johnstown Half-Marathon this weekend.  We also talk about some reviews of the Tower of Terror 10-miler and take some calls.
Stevie and I talk about getting out of a running funk, refractionist
the release of Zombies, Run! on Android, and Stevie jumping back on the Weight Watchers bandwagon.  Of course some wonderful calls at the end!
This week, sovaldi we talk about using a run/walk as a strategy, drugs especially in the heat, Stevie’s cruise, and more about Zombies, Run on Android.  Lots of listener calls as well.
This week, sovaldi we talk about using a run/walk as a strategy, drugs especially in the heat, Stevie’s cruise, and more about Zombies, Run on Android.  Lots of listener calls as well.
We discuss my recent return to the swimming pool, treatment
Stevie running on the beach while on vacation, public health
and enjoying the Summer Olympics.  Then we get caught up with some listener calls including a question about running two marathons two weeks apart.
This week, approved Stevie and I talk about a break in the summer heat, health the 20th anniversary medal for the Disney Marathon, Stevie’s injury, the summer Olympics, a package from Simon, and calls from listeners.
Stevie and I give some fueling advice to someone planning her first half marathon.  I talk about my switch to running before going to work.  Stevie talks about learning to accept walking as part of her running.  We also talk about McDonalds and their healthier Happy Meals.
Stevie and I talk about protecting yourself from the summer sun, sanitary Stevie’s recent run of the Komen 5K, grip and then we focus on some guidelines for race reports before playing a bunch of calls. Here are the guidelines:

  • Keep the call under 3 minutes since that’s the limit with Google Voice
  • Focus on the highs and lows
  • Mention anything that makes this race unique

It’s a call-in show! This week we got caught up with all of the race reports: two about the Broad Street Run in Philadelphia, see two first-time triathletes, a 100 mile ultramarathon, a touching story from a race voluneteer, and more. We actually got a question this time!
It’s a call-in show! This week we got caught up with all of the race reports: two about the Broad Street Run in Philadelphia, see two first-time triathletes, a 100 mile ultramarathon, a touching story from a race voluneteer, and more. We actually got a question this time!
This week, order
Stevie talks about her plans to run three 5K races in one weekend and her thoughts about going gluten-free.  I have the Johnstown Half-Marathon this weekend.  We also talk about some reviews of the Tower of Terror 10-miler and take some calls.
It’s a call-in show! This week we got caught up with all of the race reports: two about the Broad Street Run in Philadelphia, see two first-time triathletes, a 100 mile ultramarathon, a touching story from a race voluneteer, and more. We actually got a question this time!
This week, order
Stevie talks about her plans to run three 5K races in one weekend and her thoughts about going gluten-free.  I have the Johnstown Half-Marathon this weekend.  We also talk about some reviews of the Tower of Terror 10-miler and take some calls.
Stevie and I talk about getting out of a running funk, refractionist
the release of Zombies, Run! on Android, and Stevie jumping back on the Weight Watchers bandwagon.  Of course some wonderful calls at the end!
This week, sovaldi we talk about using a run/walk as a strategy, drugs especially in the heat, Stevie’s cruise, and more about Zombies, Run on Android.  Lots of listener calls as well.
This week, sovaldi we talk about using a run/walk as a strategy, drugs especially in the heat, Stevie’s cruise, and more about Zombies, Run on Android.  Lots of listener calls as well.
We discuss my recent return to the swimming pool, treatment
Stevie running on the beach while on vacation, public health
and enjoying the Summer Olympics.  Then we get caught up with some listener calls including a question about running two marathons two weeks apart.
This week, approved Stevie and I talk about a break in the summer heat, health the 20th anniversary medal for the Disney Marathon, Stevie’s injury, the summer Olympics, a package from Simon, and calls from listeners.
This week, herpes Stevie and I talk about a break in the summer heat, the 20th anniversary medal for the Disney Marathon, Stevie’s injury, the summer Olympics, a package from Simon, and calls from listeners.
Stevie is back from her cruise.  This week, this unhealthy we talk about that as well as my recent long runs and an update on the Disney Marathon.  After that’ we take a chunk out of the backlog of listener calls.  Enjoy!
Stevie is back from her cruise.  This week, this unhealthy we talk about that as well as my recent long runs and an update on the Disney Marathon.  After that’ we take a chunk out of the backlog of listener calls.  Enjoy!
The days are getting shorter.  It’s harder to get out of bed and easier to sit at home and eat pie.  This week, neurologist Stevie and I talk about holiday stress, dealing with darker days, my preparations for the Disney Marathon, and many listener calls.
Stevie is back from her cruise.  This week, this unhealthy we talk about that as well as my recent long runs and an update on the Disney Marathon.  After that’ we take a chunk out of the backlog of listener calls.  Enjoy!
The days are getting shorter.  It’s harder to get out of bed and easier to sit at home and eat pie.  This week, neurologist Stevie and I talk about holiday stress, dealing with darker days, my preparations for the Disney Marathon, and many listener calls.
Stevie and I talk about Beck’s minor injury, this site preparing for the Johnstown Half-Marathon, getting some extra use out of old running shoes, and group fitness.  Then we get caught up on a bunch of listener calls.
Stevie is back from her cruise.  This week, this unhealthy we talk about that as well as my recent long runs and an update on the Disney Marathon.  After that’ we take a chunk out of the backlog of listener calls.  Enjoy!
The days are getting shorter.  It’s harder to get out of bed and easier to sit at home and eat pie.  This week, neurologist Stevie and I talk about holiday stress, dealing with darker days, my preparations for the Disney Marathon, and many listener calls.
Stevie and I talk about Beck’s minor injury, this site preparing for the Johnstown Half-Marathon, getting some extra use out of old running shoes, and group fitness.  Then we get caught up on a bunch of listener calls.
Stevie and I talk about Beck’s minor injury, this site preparing for the Johnstown Half-Marathon, getting some extra use out of old running shoes, and group fitness.  Then we get caught up on a bunch of listener calls.
This week, price
buy Stevie talks about her plans to run three 5K races in one weekend and her thoughts about going gluten-free.  I have the Johnstown Half-Marathon this weekend.  We also talk about some reviews of the Tower of Terror 10-miler and take some calls.
Stevie is back from her cruise.  This week, this unhealthy we talk about that as well as my recent long runs and an update on the Disney Marathon.  After that’ we take a chunk out of the backlog of listener calls.  Enjoy!
The days are getting shorter.  It’s harder to get out of bed and easier to sit at home and eat pie.  This week, neurologist Stevie and I talk about holiday stress, dealing with darker days, my preparations for the Disney Marathon, and many listener calls.
Stevie and I talk about Beck’s minor injury, this site preparing for the Johnstown Half-Marathon, getting some extra use out of old running shoes, and group fitness.  Then we get caught up on a bunch of listener calls.
Stevie and I talk about Beck’s minor injury, this site preparing for the Johnstown Half-Marathon, getting some extra use out of old running shoes, and group fitness.  Then we get caught up on a bunch of listener calls.
This week, price
buy Stevie talks about her plans to run three 5K races in one weekend and her thoughts about going gluten-free.  I have the Johnstown Half-Marathon this weekend.  We also talk about some reviews of the Tower of Terror 10-miler and take some calls.
This week, ophthalmologist Stevie talks about running three 5K races in two days.  I talk about the Johnstown Half-Marathon and Beck’s IT Band Issue.  Then we talk a bit about the Mount Nittany Marathon that’s coming to town next years and some listener calls.
Stevie is back from her cruise.  This week, this unhealthy we talk about that as well as my recent long runs and an update on the Disney Marathon.  After that’ we take a chunk out of the backlog of listener calls.  Enjoy!
The days are getting shorter.  It’s harder to get out of bed and easier to sit at home and eat pie.  This week, neurologist Stevie and I talk about holiday stress, dealing with darker days, my preparations for the Disney Marathon, and many listener calls.
Stevie and I talk about Beck’s minor injury, this site preparing for the Johnstown Half-Marathon, getting some extra use out of old running shoes, and group fitness.  Then we get caught up on a bunch of listener calls.
Stevie and I talk about Beck’s minor injury, this site preparing for the Johnstown Half-Marathon, getting some extra use out of old running shoes, and group fitness.  Then we get caught up on a bunch of listener calls.
This week, price
buy Stevie talks about her plans to run three 5K races in one weekend and her thoughts about going gluten-free.  I have the Johnstown Half-Marathon this weekend.  We also talk about some reviews of the Tower of Terror 10-miler and take some calls.
This week, ophthalmologist Stevie talks about running three 5K races in two days.  I talk about the Johnstown Half-Marathon and Beck’s IT Band Issue.  Then we talk a bit about the Mount Nittany Marathon that’s coming to town next years and some listener calls.
This week, cardiologist we talk about post-race blues, the appeal of an ultramarathon, knee pain when it isn’t the shoes, an update about the Mountainback, and several listener calls, especially about the Chicago Marathon.
Stevie and I talk about what we have done when we’ve had disappointing races and how to get over them, clinic prescription how our Thankgiving holidays went, different weight loss systems, and several listener calls.
Stevie and I talk about what we have done when we’ve had disappointing races and how to get over them, clinic prescription how our Thankgiving holidays went, different weight loss systems, and several listener calls.
On this episode, treat we talk about Stevie volunteering at a local half-marathon, information pills the MyFitnessPal app, an update on Beck’s visit to the orthopedic surgeon and physical therapy, and calls from listeners.
Stevie and I talk about what we have done when we’ve had disappointing races and how to get over them, clinic prescription how our Thankgiving holidays went, different weight loss systems, and several listener calls.
On this episode, treat we talk about Stevie volunteering at a local half-marathon, information pills the MyFitnessPal app, an update on Beck’s visit to the orthopedic surgeon and physical therapy, and calls from listeners.
On this episode, information pills we talk about Stevie volunteering at a local half-marathon, side effects the MyFitnessPal app, an update on Beck’s visit to the orthopedic surgeon and physical therapy, and calls from listeners.
Stevie and I talk about what we have done when we’ve had disappointing races and how to get over them, clinic prescription how our Thankgiving holidays went, different weight loss systems, and several listener calls.
On this episode, treat we talk about Stevie volunteering at a local half-marathon, information pills the MyFitnessPal app, an update on Beck’s visit to the orthopedic surgeon and physical therapy, and calls from listeners.
On this episode, information pills we talk about Stevie volunteering at a local half-marathon, side effects the MyFitnessPal app, an update on Beck’s visit to the orthopedic surgeon and physical therapy, and calls from listeners.
In our first podcast of 2013, mind Stevie and I talk about the upcoming Disney Marathon, buy cialis Stevie trying an Arc Trainer fitness machine, Stevie’s FitBit and data obsession, our plans for 2013.  Then we get into some calls from listeners.
Stevie and I talk about what we have done when we’ve had disappointing races and how to get over them, clinic prescription how our Thankgiving holidays went, different weight loss systems, and several listener calls.
On this episode, treat we talk about Stevie volunteering at a local half-marathon, information pills the MyFitnessPal app, an update on Beck’s visit to the orthopedic surgeon and physical therapy, and calls from listeners.
On this episode, information pills we talk about Stevie volunteering at a local half-marathon, side effects the MyFitnessPal app, an update on Beck’s visit to the orthopedic surgeon and physical therapy, and calls from listeners.
In our first podcast of 2013, mind Stevie and I talk about the upcoming Disney Marathon, buy cialis Stevie trying an Arc Trainer fitness machine, Stevie’s FitBit and data obsession, our plans for 2013.  Then we get into some calls from listeners.
This week, viagra dosage Stevie and I talk about the 2013 Disney World Marathon, approved Stevie’s Fit Bit tracking device, a friend at the Biggest Loser fitness camp, running a first 5K, and more.
The majority of this episode is dedicated to an interview with Jim, link arthritis a friend of Stevie’s who recently spent two weeks at Biggest Loser Camp in Malibu.
The majority of this episode is dedicated to an interview with Jim, link arthritis a friend of Stevie’s who recently spent two weeks at Biggest Loser Camp in Malibu.
Stevie and I are back!  In this episode, click we talk about Beck’s and my experience registering for the Chicago Marathon, buy Stevie’s back, knee exercises, Stevie getting back into running with some new goals, and the results of our poll about listener call-ins.
The majority of this episode is dedicated to an interview with Jim, link arthritis a friend of Stevie’s who recently spent two weeks at Biggest Loser Camp in Malibu.
Stevie and I are back!  In this episode, click we talk about Beck’s and my experience registering for the Chicago Marathon, buy Stevie’s back, knee exercises, Stevie getting back into running with some new goals, and the results of our poll about listener call-ins.
In this episode, opisthorchiasis Stevie and I talk about the attack on the Boston Marathon last week, pfizer including an account from Kim, who ran the race.   We also give a fitness update, play several calls, and at the end of the show, I announce a big life change that I’m making this summer.
The majority of this episode is dedicated to an interview with Jim, link arthritis a friend of Stevie’s who recently spent two weeks at Biggest Loser Camp in Malibu.
Stevie and I are back!  In this episode, click we talk about Beck’s and my experience registering for the Chicago Marathon, buy Stevie’s back, knee exercises, Stevie getting back into running with some new goals, and the results of our poll about listener call-ins.
In this episode, opisthorchiasis Stevie and I talk about the attack on the Boston Marathon last week, pfizer including an account from Kim, who ran the race.   We also give a fitness update, play several calls, and at the end of the show, I announce a big life change that I’m making this summer.
In this episode, sick Stevie and I talk about the new version of the Zombies Run app (available for Andriod and iPhones), our recent exercise activity, and Stevie’s progress on her 100-miles per month challenge.  After that, we take a bunch of listener calls.

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Running with the Pack 86: New Nike+ Shoes, 18-Mile Run, Cross Country Madness, and Jason’s Half-Marathon

This week, viagra 40mg we cover a ton of topics including Stevie’s vacation plans, one health my bike update, body image, what to do when you’re injured (cross train and do a triathlon obviously), mud/adventure runs, margarita cliff blocks, gluten free life, Facebook mania, and more.
This week, viagra 40mg we cover a ton of topics including Stevie’s vacation plans, one health my bike update, body image, what to do when you’re injured (cross train and do a triathlon obviously), mud/adventure runs, margarita cliff blocks, gluten free life, Facebook mania, and more.
Stevie and I talk about an organic gel called Chocolate #9, ambulance getting lost or being late at races, sales the anti-chafing lotion “Skin Sake“, doing back to back long workouts, Disney for Marathon Weekend, and a good luck shout-out to IronBrandon. He’s doing Ironman Louisville on August 29th.
This week, viagra 40mg we cover a ton of topics including Stevie’s vacation plans, one health my bike update, body image, what to do when you’re injured (cross train and do a triathlon obviously), mud/adventure runs, margarita cliff blocks, gluten free life, Facebook mania, and more.
Stevie and I talk about an organic gel called Chocolate #9, ambulance getting lost or being late at races, sales the anti-chafing lotion “Skin Sake“, doing back to back long workouts, Disney for Marathon Weekend, and a good luck shout-out to IronBrandon. He’s doing Ironman Louisville on August 29th.
Stevie is back from vacation! Scott Sloan joins us this week to talk about running his first ultramarathon. We also talk about chafing, herbal options for organic running fuel, Stevie’s beach runs, my upcoming triathlons, wetsuit flotation, and a few other topics.
This week, viagra 40mg we cover a ton of topics including Stevie’s vacation plans, one health my bike update, body image, what to do when you’re injured (cross train and do a triathlon obviously), mud/adventure runs, margarita cliff blocks, gluten free life, Facebook mania, and more.
Stevie and I talk about an organic gel called Chocolate #9, ambulance getting lost or being late at races, sales the anti-chafing lotion “Skin Sake“, doing back to back long workouts, Disney for Marathon Weekend, and a good luck shout-out to IronBrandon. He’s doing Ironman Louisville on August 29th.
Stevie is back from vacation! Scott Sloan joins us this week to talk about running his first ultramarathon. We also talk about chafing, herbal options for organic running fuel, Stevie’s beach runs, my upcoming triathlons, wetsuit flotation, and a few other topics.
Stevie is back from vacation! Scott Sloan joins us this week to talk about running his first ultramarathon. We also talk about chafing, herbal options for organic running fuel, Stevie’s beach runs, my upcoming triathlons, wetsuit flotation, and a few other topics.
Three reviews this week: Skin Sake, story
Chocolate #9, order and adult versus kid Sharkies. We also talk about the album of review photos on Facebook, a neck injury that interfered with my triathlon plans, massages and chiropractors, focusing on health over performance, and a noticeable change in sweat volume.
This week, viagra 40mg we cover a ton of topics including Stevie’s vacation plans, one health my bike update, body image, what to do when you’re injured (cross train and do a triathlon obviously), mud/adventure runs, margarita cliff blocks, gluten free life, Facebook mania, and more.
Stevie and I talk about an organic gel called Chocolate #9, ambulance getting lost or being late at races, sales the anti-chafing lotion “Skin Sake“, doing back to back long workouts, Disney for Marathon Weekend, and a good luck shout-out to IronBrandon. He’s doing Ironman Louisville on August 29th.
Stevie is back from vacation! Scott Sloan joins us this week to talk about running his first ultramarathon. We also talk about chafing, herbal options for organic running fuel, Stevie’s beach runs, my upcoming triathlons, wetsuit flotation, and a few other topics.
Stevie is back from vacation! Scott Sloan joins us this week to talk about running his first ultramarathon. We also talk about chafing, herbal options for organic running fuel, Stevie’s beach runs, my upcoming triathlons, wetsuit flotation, and a few other topics.
Three reviews this week: Skin Sake, story
Chocolate #9, order and adult versus kid Sharkies. We also talk about the album of review photos on Facebook, a neck injury that interfered with my triathlon plans, massages and chiropractors, focusing on health over performance, and a noticeable change in sweat volume.
This episode is dedicated to Ben Davis and his weight loss journey. He has lost 120 pounds since January 2009. Last week, oncology he made and posted a video to chronicle his story. We wanted to get the inside scoop and he agreed, sick so here it is. Enjoy!

If you want to follow Ben’s progress, check out bendoeslife.tumblr.com!
This week, diagnosis information pills I talk about my new Nike Run Free+ shoes and the Nike+ GPS App, my 18-mile run, Stevie’s cross country pasta party, good luck to Geeks in Running Shoes’ Jason with his upcoming half-marathon, and much more. Just four more weeks until the Chicago Marathon!

[Fair warning: This is NOT a learn-to-speak-a-foreign-language podcast! We apologize in advance to all of our French and Chinese speaking listeners.]

Posted in iPhone, Nike+, running | Tagged , , , | Comments Off on Running with the Pack 86: New Nike+ Shoes, 18-Mile Run, Cross Country Madness, and Jason’s Half-Marathon

Running with the Pack 72: Tracking Apps, Bike Issues, Plantar Faciitis, Spring Running, Insanity Workout

On episode #71, about it Stevie and I discussed the idea of seeing if any listeners were graphic artists who could design a logo for the show. I tried to describe what I meant. The best way of doing it is to show my favorite race medal. It’s the one from the 2008 Flying Pig Marathon.

[gallery link="file" columns="2" orderby="title"]

It doesn’t have to be nearly that complex. What I have in mind is something with three sayings around the edge. The front is “Have Fun” “Get Your Body Moving” and “Feel Like A Champion”. The back edge would say “Running With The Pack” and “www.parkedthoughts.com”. As for the center image, tablets silhouettes of two or more runners with their arms raised up (like they are breaking the tape) would be fun. Something like this one of me and Brandon at the Philadelphia Marathon:

Crossing the Finish Line

I’m open to other ideas as well.

I’d like to take that design and use it for things like mugs, custom coins, and medals that I can send to people or have for purchase on the web site to raise money for a charitable cause like breast cancer research or treating children with cancer.

Anyway, if you feel up for the challenge or know someone who could do something like this, please let me know!
On episode #71, about it Stevie and I discussed the idea of seeing if any listeners were graphic artists who could design a logo for the show. I tried to describe what I meant. The best way of doing it is to show my favorite race medal. It’s the one from the 2008 Flying Pig Marathon.

[gallery link="file" columns="2" orderby="title"]

It doesn’t have to be nearly that complex. What I have in mind is something with three sayings around the edge. The front is “Have Fun” “Get Your Body Moving” and “Feel Like A Champion”. The back edge would say “Running With The Pack” and “www.parkedthoughts.com”. As for the center image, tablets silhouettes of two or more runners with their arms raised up (like they are breaking the tape) would be fun. Something like this one of me and Brandon at the Philadelphia Marathon:

Crossing the Finish Line

I’m open to other ideas as well.

I’d like to take that design and use it for things like mugs, custom coins, and medals that I can send to people or have for purchase on the web site to raise money for a charitable cause like breast cancer research or treating children with cancer.

Anyway, if you feel up for the challenge or know someone who could do something like this, please let me know!
On episode #71, about it Stevie and I discussed the idea of seeing if any listeners were graphic artists who could design a logo for the show. I tried to describe what I meant. The best way of doing it is to show my favorite race medal. It’s the one from the 2008 Flying Pig Marathon.

[gallery link="file" columns="2" orderby="title"]

It doesn’t have to be nearly that complex. What I have in mind is something with three sayings around the edge. The front is “Have Fun” “Get Your Body Moving” and “Feel Like A Champion”. The back edge would say “Running With The Pack” and “www.parkedthoughts.com”. As for the center image, tablets silhouettes of two or more runners with their arms raised up (like they are breaking the tape) would be fun. Something like this one of me and Brandon at the Philadelphia Marathon:

Crossing the Finish Line

I’m open to other ideas as well.

I’d like to take that design and use it for things like mugs, custom coins, and medals that I can send to people or have for purchase on the web site to raise money for a charitable cause like breast cancer research or treating children with cancer.

Anyway, if you feel up for the challenge or know someone who could do something like this, please let me know!
Stevie and I talk about some mobile applications that help you track your runs, visit this
my good and bad experiences on the bike, dealing with plantar faciitis, getting into spring runs, and looking forward to starting the Insanity Workout DVD program.

Posted in cycling, gadgets, iPhone, mobility, podcasting, running | Tagged , , , , , , | 12 Comments

Vista, Mac, or iPhone?

The Nike + iPod graph from my first run.
The Nike + iPod graph from my first run.
I went to the doctor this week and my cholesterol is not too great. I don’t get how that happens. I exercise and I’m a vegetarian. Andrew, gerontologist who eats the same stuff as I do, recipe has a cholesterol level around 150 and I’m above 200. Bad genes? You bet. Both of my parents are on cholesterol-lowering drugs. Maybe Lipitor is on the horizon, but I’m still going to try to manage it with diet and exercise. My doctor suggested flax oil and niacin-rich foods or a supplement, so I’ve started taking both niacin and flax daily to see if it helps. Andrew started taking them too. With my luck, my cholesterol will keep getting worse while Andrew will be able to bend space and time.
The Nike + iPod graph from my first run.
I went to the doctor this week and my cholesterol is not too great. I don’t get how that happens. I exercise and I’m a vegetarian. Andrew, gerontologist who eats the same stuff as I do, recipe has a cholesterol level around 150 and I’m above 200. Bad genes? You bet. Both of my parents are on cholesterol-lowering drugs. Maybe Lipitor is on the horizon, but I’m still going to try to manage it with diet and exercise. My doctor suggested flax oil and niacin-rich foods or a supplement, so I’ve started taking both niacin and flax daily to see if it helps. Andrew started taking them too. With my luck, my cholesterol will keep getting worse while Andrew will be able to bend space and time.
Today was just my second day with the Nike+ system and after I was done running 4 miles, remedy I got the normal “workout complete” message, more about but then Lance Armstrong’s voice came on and said something along the lines of “Congratulations, that was your longest run ever”. I don’t idolize Lance or anything, but I thought it was a nice touch. It’s good to recognize a new personal record because, frankly, I’m only competing with myself. A few limitations of the system:

  • I can’t enter historical data about myself. My actual longest-ever run was about 16 miles, back in the mid 1990’s. I might get there again some day, now that I can afford good shoes and can work out the time needed to do a 3-hour workout. But I can’t enter that personal record into the system or anything like my old high school times. Maybe that’s a good thing.
  • Warm-up and cool-down periods will mess up my data. I typically walk several laps to cool down — or I may just walk the whole time if I’ve injured something. The calories will still count, but the average-time calculations will mess up my overall averages while running. This doesn’t seem like a big deal, but one of my goals is to have several workouts under a 8:20 average mile, which would be killed with a cool-down time included. I may have to let this one go. I’m more interested in distance and calories anyway.
  • I can’t enter alternate forms of exercise. If I swim 20 laps one day, I can’t enter that workout data into my charts. Same goes for working out on exercise machines. A treadmill may work (I’m not sure and would be interested if anyone has tried it), but probably not a stair climber or elliptical machine.

When all is said and done though, it’s a great system and I’m very happy with it. Now, I need to go pick a power song.
The Nike + iPod graph from my first run.
I went to the doctor this week and my cholesterol is not too great. I don’t get how that happens. I exercise and I’m a vegetarian. Andrew, gerontologist who eats the same stuff as I do, recipe has a cholesterol level around 150 and I’m above 200. Bad genes? You bet. Both of my parents are on cholesterol-lowering drugs. Maybe Lipitor is on the horizon, but I’m still going to try to manage it with diet and exercise. My doctor suggested flax oil and niacin-rich foods or a supplement, so I’ve started taking both niacin and flax daily to see if it helps. Andrew started taking them too. With my luck, my cholesterol will keep getting worse while Andrew will be able to bend space and time.
Today was just my second day with the Nike+ system and after I was done running 4 miles, remedy I got the normal “workout complete” message, more about but then Lance Armstrong’s voice came on and said something along the lines of “Congratulations, that was your longest run ever”. I don’t idolize Lance or anything, but I thought it was a nice touch. It’s good to recognize a new personal record because, frankly, I’m only competing with myself. A few limitations of the system:

  • I can’t enter historical data about myself. My actual longest-ever run was about 16 miles, back in the mid 1990’s. I might get there again some day, now that I can afford good shoes and can work out the time needed to do a 3-hour workout. But I can’t enter that personal record into the system or anything like my old high school times. Maybe that’s a good thing.
  • Warm-up and cool-down periods will mess up my data. I typically walk several laps to cool down — or I may just walk the whole time if I’ve injured something. The calories will still count, but the average-time calculations will mess up my overall averages while running. This doesn’t seem like a big deal, but one of my goals is to have several workouts under a 8:20 average mile, which would be killed with a cool-down time included. I may have to let this one go. I’m more interested in distance and calories anyway.
  • I can’t enter alternate forms of exercise. If I swim 20 laps one day, I can’t enter that workout data into my charts. Same goes for working out on exercise machines. A treadmill may work (I’m not sure and would be interested if anyone has tried it), but probably not a stair climber or elliptical machine.

When all is said and done though, it’s a great system and I’m very happy with it. Now, I need to go pick a power song.
Okay, cialis 40mg I’m no expert, but I took one recipe and did a lot of substitutions to replace things like egg yolks and butter with more heart-friendly ingredients. The sun butter and walnuts still have fat, but supposedly a more healthy kind. if you make a batch, let me know what you think:

3 cups Oatmeal
1.5 cups whole wheat flour
2 cups applesauce
4 egg whites
1.5 cups brown sugar
2 tsp vanilla
2 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp nutmeg
1 tsp baking soda
1.5 cups golden raisins
2 tbsp sun butter (like peanut butter, except made from sunflower seeds – use peanut butter if you like)
1 cup chopped walnuts

Don’t measure precisely — I never do. Mix it all up and use a tablespoon to scoop the mix onto a cookie sheet (I use parchment paper to prevent sticking). Cook for about 12 minutes at 350F. You know they’re done when they’re a little toasted on the surface and they should hold their shape after begin cooled for about 5 minutes.

edit: I reduced the cups of oatmeal from 4 to 3. The last batch came out a little too oaty.
The Nike + iPod graph from my first run.
I went to the doctor this week and my cholesterol is not too great. I don’t get how that happens. I exercise and I’m a vegetarian. Andrew, gerontologist who eats the same stuff as I do, recipe has a cholesterol level around 150 and I’m above 200. Bad genes? You bet. Both of my parents are on cholesterol-lowering drugs. Maybe Lipitor is on the horizon, but I’m still going to try to manage it with diet and exercise. My doctor suggested flax oil and niacin-rich foods or a supplement, so I’ve started taking both niacin and flax daily to see if it helps. Andrew started taking them too. With my luck, my cholesterol will keep getting worse while Andrew will be able to bend space and time.
Today was just my second day with the Nike+ system and after I was done running 4 miles, remedy I got the normal “workout complete” message, more about but then Lance Armstrong’s voice came on and said something along the lines of “Congratulations, that was your longest run ever”. I don’t idolize Lance or anything, but I thought it was a nice touch. It’s good to recognize a new personal record because, frankly, I’m only competing with myself. A few limitations of the system:

  • I can’t enter historical data about myself. My actual longest-ever run was about 16 miles, back in the mid 1990’s. I might get there again some day, now that I can afford good shoes and can work out the time needed to do a 3-hour workout. But I can’t enter that personal record into the system or anything like my old high school times. Maybe that’s a good thing.
  • Warm-up and cool-down periods will mess up my data. I typically walk several laps to cool down — or I may just walk the whole time if I’ve injured something. The calories will still count, but the average-time calculations will mess up my overall averages while running. This doesn’t seem like a big deal, but one of my goals is to have several workouts under a 8:20 average mile, which would be killed with a cool-down time included. I may have to let this one go. I’m more interested in distance and calories anyway.
  • I can’t enter alternate forms of exercise. If I swim 20 laps one day, I can’t enter that workout data into my charts. Same goes for working out on exercise machines. A treadmill may work (I’m not sure and would be interested if anyone has tried it), but probably not a stair climber or elliptical machine.

When all is said and done though, it’s a great system and I’m very happy with it. Now, I need to go pick a power song.
Okay, cialis 40mg I’m no expert, but I took one recipe and did a lot of substitutions to replace things like egg yolks and butter with more heart-friendly ingredients. The sun butter and walnuts still have fat, but supposedly a more healthy kind. if you make a batch, let me know what you think:

3 cups Oatmeal
1.5 cups whole wheat flour
2 cups applesauce
4 egg whites
1.5 cups brown sugar
2 tsp vanilla
2 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp nutmeg
1 tsp baking soda
1.5 cups golden raisins
2 tbsp sun butter (like peanut butter, except made from sunflower seeds – use peanut butter if you like)
1 cup chopped walnuts

Don’t measure precisely — I never do. Mix it all up and use a tablespoon to scoop the mix onto a cookie sheet (I use parchment paper to prevent sticking). Cook for about 12 minutes at 350F. You know they’re done when they’re a little toasted on the surface and they should hold their shape after begin cooled for about 5 minutes.

edit: I reduced the cups of oatmeal from 4 to 3. The last batch came out a little too oaty.
A little over a week ago (January 27th), population health I joined Twitter along with a bunch of people from work. Basically, online it lets you answer the question “What are you doing now?” throughout the day. People post about breakfast, migraine the weather, server problems, and such, but I find that the most interesting posts are about thoughts or recent discoveries. In that sense, it’s more like a 10-second blog or nanoblog than simply a stream of what a bunch of people are doing. It’s a stream of human activity in its more broad sense.

Anyway, it’s coming up on two weeks and I have found that Twitter helps to organize my thoughts, I have a better sense of the people at the office, my boss and the CIO know what I’m doing with my time, and I have a hundred opportunities a day to talk to one of my colleagues based on something they find interesting and post as a tweet. I have a feeling that the same people who blog will be the ones that Twitter the most, which is a shame really, because I have no idea what the other people in my office are thinking on a daily basis. Overall, good stuff.
The Nike + iPod graph from my first run.
I went to the doctor this week and my cholesterol is not too great. I don’t get how that happens. I exercise and I’m a vegetarian. Andrew, gerontologist who eats the same stuff as I do, recipe has a cholesterol level around 150 and I’m above 200. Bad genes? You bet. Both of my parents are on cholesterol-lowering drugs. Maybe Lipitor is on the horizon, but I’m still going to try to manage it with diet and exercise. My doctor suggested flax oil and niacin-rich foods or a supplement, so I’ve started taking both niacin and flax daily to see if it helps. Andrew started taking them too. With my luck, my cholesterol will keep getting worse while Andrew will be able to bend space and time.
Today was just my second day with the Nike+ system and after I was done running 4 miles, remedy I got the normal “workout complete” message, more about but then Lance Armstrong’s voice came on and said something along the lines of “Congratulations, that was your longest run ever”. I don’t idolize Lance or anything, but I thought it was a nice touch. It’s good to recognize a new personal record because, frankly, I’m only competing with myself. A few limitations of the system:

  • I can’t enter historical data about myself. My actual longest-ever run was about 16 miles, back in the mid 1990’s. I might get there again some day, now that I can afford good shoes and can work out the time needed to do a 3-hour workout. But I can’t enter that personal record into the system or anything like my old high school times. Maybe that’s a good thing.
  • Warm-up and cool-down periods will mess up my data. I typically walk several laps to cool down — or I may just walk the whole time if I’ve injured something. The calories will still count, but the average-time calculations will mess up my overall averages while running. This doesn’t seem like a big deal, but one of my goals is to have several workouts under a 8:20 average mile, which would be killed with a cool-down time included. I may have to let this one go. I’m more interested in distance and calories anyway.
  • I can’t enter alternate forms of exercise. If I swim 20 laps one day, I can’t enter that workout data into my charts. Same goes for working out on exercise machines. A treadmill may work (I’m not sure and would be interested if anyone has tried it), but probably not a stair climber or elliptical machine.

When all is said and done though, it’s a great system and I’m very happy with it. Now, I need to go pick a power song.
Okay, cialis 40mg I’m no expert, but I took one recipe and did a lot of substitutions to replace things like egg yolks and butter with more heart-friendly ingredients. The sun butter and walnuts still have fat, but supposedly a more healthy kind. if you make a batch, let me know what you think:

3 cups Oatmeal
1.5 cups whole wheat flour
2 cups applesauce
4 egg whites
1.5 cups brown sugar
2 tsp vanilla
2 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp nutmeg
1 tsp baking soda
1.5 cups golden raisins
2 tbsp sun butter (like peanut butter, except made from sunflower seeds – use peanut butter if you like)
1 cup chopped walnuts

Don’t measure precisely — I never do. Mix it all up and use a tablespoon to scoop the mix onto a cookie sheet (I use parchment paper to prevent sticking). Cook for about 12 minutes at 350F. You know they’re done when they’re a little toasted on the surface and they should hold their shape after begin cooled for about 5 minutes.

edit: I reduced the cups of oatmeal from 4 to 3. The last batch came out a little too oaty.
A little over a week ago (January 27th), population health I joined Twitter along with a bunch of people from work. Basically, online it lets you answer the question “What are you doing now?” throughout the day. People post about breakfast, migraine the weather, server problems, and such, but I find that the most interesting posts are about thoughts or recent discoveries. In that sense, it’s more like a 10-second blog or nanoblog than simply a stream of what a bunch of people are doing. It’s a stream of human activity in its more broad sense.

Anyway, it’s coming up on two weeks and I have found that Twitter helps to organize my thoughts, I have a better sense of the people at the office, my boss and the CIO know what I’m doing with my time, and I have a hundred opportunities a day to talk to one of my colleagues based on something they find interesting and post as a tweet. I have a feeling that the same people who blog will be the ones that Twitter the most, which is a shame really, because I have no idea what the other people in my office are thinking on a daily basis. Overall, good stuff.
When I’ve heard about problems with using online text resources (PDFs and electronic textbooks), infection the focus seems to be on issues like contrast, resolution, and eyestrain. I just spent a couple of hours looking up some articles online and I think the problem has nothing to do with these technical issues (at least for me) since I spend a LOT of time reading and writing online. For me, the issue is how these resources feed into my activity.

When I write and need to use a lot of reference material. I don’t read the sources and then write all at once. I’m constantly moving back and forth between what I’m writing and what I’m reading, especially if I want to quote something correctly. If these are all on a computer screen, I don’t want to flip back and forth between applications — that breaks the flow of my writing activity.

This has been on my mind lately (and now parked in the blog) because I’ve spent a lot of time this weekend looking up reference articles on my laptop. I feel more constrained than usual because in my office, I have a dual-screen setup (laptop and external monitor). There, I can have all of my reading materials visible on one screen while I have the writing application open on another. I don’t feel the need to print out everything. On the other hand, this weekend, with only one screen, I feel cramped. At one point, I was actually using two computers: one to display reference material and the other to write.

In any case, I’ll have to look into this further. Ultimately, I prefer electronic reference materials, to save paper and ink, but also because they are searchable and easy to file away for future reference.
The Nike + iPod graph from my first run.
I went to the doctor this week and my cholesterol is not too great. I don’t get how that happens. I exercise and I’m a vegetarian. Andrew, gerontologist who eats the same stuff as I do, recipe has a cholesterol level around 150 and I’m above 200. Bad genes? You bet. Both of my parents are on cholesterol-lowering drugs. Maybe Lipitor is on the horizon, but I’m still going to try to manage it with diet and exercise. My doctor suggested flax oil and niacin-rich foods or a supplement, so I’ve started taking both niacin and flax daily to see if it helps. Andrew started taking them too. With my luck, my cholesterol will keep getting worse while Andrew will be able to bend space and time.
Today was just my second day with the Nike+ system and after I was done running 4 miles, remedy I got the normal “workout complete” message, more about but then Lance Armstrong’s voice came on and said something along the lines of “Congratulations, that was your longest run ever”. I don’t idolize Lance or anything, but I thought it was a nice touch. It’s good to recognize a new personal record because, frankly, I’m only competing with myself. A few limitations of the system:

  • I can’t enter historical data about myself. My actual longest-ever run was about 16 miles, back in the mid 1990’s. I might get there again some day, now that I can afford good shoes and can work out the time needed to do a 3-hour workout. But I can’t enter that personal record into the system or anything like my old high school times. Maybe that’s a good thing.
  • Warm-up and cool-down periods will mess up my data. I typically walk several laps to cool down — or I may just walk the whole time if I’ve injured something. The calories will still count, but the average-time calculations will mess up my overall averages while running. This doesn’t seem like a big deal, but one of my goals is to have several workouts under a 8:20 average mile, which would be killed with a cool-down time included. I may have to let this one go. I’m more interested in distance and calories anyway.
  • I can’t enter alternate forms of exercise. If I swim 20 laps one day, I can’t enter that workout data into my charts. Same goes for working out on exercise machines. A treadmill may work (I’m not sure and would be interested if anyone has tried it), but probably not a stair climber or elliptical machine.

When all is said and done though, it’s a great system and I’m very happy with it. Now, I need to go pick a power song.
Okay, cialis 40mg I’m no expert, but I took one recipe and did a lot of substitutions to replace things like egg yolks and butter with more heart-friendly ingredients. The sun butter and walnuts still have fat, but supposedly a more healthy kind. if you make a batch, let me know what you think:

3 cups Oatmeal
1.5 cups whole wheat flour
2 cups applesauce
4 egg whites
1.5 cups brown sugar
2 tsp vanilla
2 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp nutmeg
1 tsp baking soda
1.5 cups golden raisins
2 tbsp sun butter (like peanut butter, except made from sunflower seeds – use peanut butter if you like)
1 cup chopped walnuts

Don’t measure precisely — I never do. Mix it all up and use a tablespoon to scoop the mix onto a cookie sheet (I use parchment paper to prevent sticking). Cook for about 12 minutes at 350F. You know they’re done when they’re a little toasted on the surface and they should hold their shape after begin cooled for about 5 minutes.

edit: I reduced the cups of oatmeal from 4 to 3. The last batch came out a little too oaty.
A little over a week ago (January 27th), population health I joined Twitter along with a bunch of people from work. Basically, online it lets you answer the question “What are you doing now?” throughout the day. People post about breakfast, migraine the weather, server problems, and such, but I find that the most interesting posts are about thoughts or recent discoveries. In that sense, it’s more like a 10-second blog or nanoblog than simply a stream of what a bunch of people are doing. It’s a stream of human activity in its more broad sense.

Anyway, it’s coming up on two weeks and I have found that Twitter helps to organize my thoughts, I have a better sense of the people at the office, my boss and the CIO know what I’m doing with my time, and I have a hundred opportunities a day to talk to one of my colleagues based on something they find interesting and post as a tweet. I have a feeling that the same people who blog will be the ones that Twitter the most, which is a shame really, because I have no idea what the other people in my office are thinking on a daily basis. Overall, good stuff.
When I’ve heard about problems with using online text resources (PDFs and electronic textbooks), infection the focus seems to be on issues like contrast, resolution, and eyestrain. I just spent a couple of hours looking up some articles online and I think the problem has nothing to do with these technical issues (at least for me) since I spend a LOT of time reading and writing online. For me, the issue is how these resources feed into my activity.

When I write and need to use a lot of reference material. I don’t read the sources and then write all at once. I’m constantly moving back and forth between what I’m writing and what I’m reading, especially if I want to quote something correctly. If these are all on a computer screen, I don’t want to flip back and forth between applications — that breaks the flow of my writing activity.

This has been on my mind lately (and now parked in the blog) because I’ve spent a lot of time this weekend looking up reference articles on my laptop. I feel more constrained than usual because in my office, I have a dual-screen setup (laptop and external monitor). There, I can have all of my reading materials visible on one screen while I have the writing application open on another. I don’t feel the need to print out everything. On the other hand, this weekend, with only one screen, I feel cramped. At one point, I was actually using two computers: one to display reference material and the other to write.

In any case, I’ll have to look into this further. Ultimately, I prefer electronic reference materials, to save paper and ink, but also because they are searchable and easy to file away for future reference.
Since I need to exercise a lot to keep the weight off (and hopefully have an improvement in my BP and cholesterol), mycoplasmosis I’ve been running about four times per week. Last weekend, viagra I ran 8 miles and I’m thinking of running 10 this weekend. It’s only February and I could see myself easily getting up to a half-marathon in another month or so. I talked with Stevie yesterday and the idea of running a marathon came up. I think I can do it. The longest distance I’ve run before was 16 miles and I stopped because I was having some joint pain. At the time, illness I didn’t know how much of an impact that my shoes could have on getting injured. I thought that I just wasn’t built for long distances. Boredom was another problem. When you’re running for more than two hours alone and on the same route, it can be rather dull.

In any case, I have a good pair of shoes now and the Nike+iPod system has been a great motivator. I’m going to build up slowly, using a program from “Galloway’s Book of Running”. Basically, short runs during the week and a long run on the weekends. I’m supposed to slow down for the long runs (1.5 to 2 minutes more per mile), but I like my normal pace. Still, I want the distance without injury, so I’ll give it a try.
The Nike + iPod graph from my first run.
I went to the doctor this week and my cholesterol is not too great. I don’t get how that happens. I exercise and I’m a vegetarian. Andrew, gerontologist who eats the same stuff as I do, recipe has a cholesterol level around 150 and I’m above 200. Bad genes? You bet. Both of my parents are on cholesterol-lowering drugs. Maybe Lipitor is on the horizon, but I’m still going to try to manage it with diet and exercise. My doctor suggested flax oil and niacin-rich foods or a supplement, so I’ve started taking both niacin and flax daily to see if it helps. Andrew started taking them too. With my luck, my cholesterol will keep getting worse while Andrew will be able to bend space and time.
Today was just my second day with the Nike+ system and after I was done running 4 miles, remedy I got the normal “workout complete” message, more about but then Lance Armstrong’s voice came on and said something along the lines of “Congratulations, that was your longest run ever”. I don’t idolize Lance or anything, but I thought it was a nice touch. It’s good to recognize a new personal record because, frankly, I’m only competing with myself. A few limitations of the system:

  • I can’t enter historical data about myself. My actual longest-ever run was about 16 miles, back in the mid 1990’s. I might get there again some day, now that I can afford good shoes and can work out the time needed to do a 3-hour workout. But I can’t enter that personal record into the system or anything like my old high school times. Maybe that’s a good thing.
  • Warm-up and cool-down periods will mess up my data. I typically walk several laps to cool down — or I may just walk the whole time if I’ve injured something. The calories will still count, but the average-time calculations will mess up my overall averages while running. This doesn’t seem like a big deal, but one of my goals is to have several workouts under a 8:20 average mile, which would be killed with a cool-down time included. I may have to let this one go. I’m more interested in distance and calories anyway.
  • I can’t enter alternate forms of exercise. If I swim 20 laps one day, I can’t enter that workout data into my charts. Same goes for working out on exercise machines. A treadmill may work (I’m not sure and would be interested if anyone has tried it), but probably not a stair climber or elliptical machine.

When all is said and done though, it’s a great system and I’m very happy with it. Now, I need to go pick a power song.
Okay, cialis 40mg I’m no expert, but I took one recipe and did a lot of substitutions to replace things like egg yolks and butter with more heart-friendly ingredients. The sun butter and walnuts still have fat, but supposedly a more healthy kind. if you make a batch, let me know what you think:

3 cups Oatmeal
1.5 cups whole wheat flour
2 cups applesauce
4 egg whites
1.5 cups brown sugar
2 tsp vanilla
2 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp nutmeg
1 tsp baking soda
1.5 cups golden raisins
2 tbsp sun butter (like peanut butter, except made from sunflower seeds – use peanut butter if you like)
1 cup chopped walnuts

Don’t measure precisely — I never do. Mix it all up and use a tablespoon to scoop the mix onto a cookie sheet (I use parchment paper to prevent sticking). Cook for about 12 minutes at 350F. You know they’re done when they’re a little toasted on the surface and they should hold their shape after begin cooled for about 5 minutes.

edit: I reduced the cups of oatmeal from 4 to 3. The last batch came out a little too oaty.
A little over a week ago (January 27th), population health I joined Twitter along with a bunch of people from work. Basically, online it lets you answer the question “What are you doing now?” throughout the day. People post about breakfast, migraine the weather, server problems, and such, but I find that the most interesting posts are about thoughts or recent discoveries. In that sense, it’s more like a 10-second blog or nanoblog than simply a stream of what a bunch of people are doing. It’s a stream of human activity in its more broad sense.

Anyway, it’s coming up on two weeks and I have found that Twitter helps to organize my thoughts, I have a better sense of the people at the office, my boss and the CIO know what I’m doing with my time, and I have a hundred opportunities a day to talk to one of my colleagues based on something they find interesting and post as a tweet. I have a feeling that the same people who blog will be the ones that Twitter the most, which is a shame really, because I have no idea what the other people in my office are thinking on a daily basis. Overall, good stuff.
When I’ve heard about problems with using online text resources (PDFs and electronic textbooks), infection the focus seems to be on issues like contrast, resolution, and eyestrain. I just spent a couple of hours looking up some articles online and I think the problem has nothing to do with these technical issues (at least for me) since I spend a LOT of time reading and writing online. For me, the issue is how these resources feed into my activity.

When I write and need to use a lot of reference material. I don’t read the sources and then write all at once. I’m constantly moving back and forth between what I’m writing and what I’m reading, especially if I want to quote something correctly. If these are all on a computer screen, I don’t want to flip back and forth between applications — that breaks the flow of my writing activity.

This has been on my mind lately (and now parked in the blog) because I’ve spent a lot of time this weekend looking up reference articles on my laptop. I feel more constrained than usual because in my office, I have a dual-screen setup (laptop and external monitor). There, I can have all of my reading materials visible on one screen while I have the writing application open on another. I don’t feel the need to print out everything. On the other hand, this weekend, with only one screen, I feel cramped. At one point, I was actually using two computers: one to display reference material and the other to write.

In any case, I’ll have to look into this further. Ultimately, I prefer electronic reference materials, to save paper and ink, but also because they are searchable and easy to file away for future reference.
Since I need to exercise a lot to keep the weight off (and hopefully have an improvement in my BP and cholesterol), mycoplasmosis I’ve been running about four times per week. Last weekend, viagra I ran 8 miles and I’m thinking of running 10 this weekend. It’s only February and I could see myself easily getting up to a half-marathon in another month or so. I talked with Stevie yesterday and the idea of running a marathon came up. I think I can do it. The longest distance I’ve run before was 16 miles and I stopped because I was having some joint pain. At the time, illness I didn’t know how much of an impact that my shoes could have on getting injured. I thought that I just wasn’t built for long distances. Boredom was another problem. When you’re running for more than two hours alone and on the same route, it can be rather dull.

In any case, I have a good pair of shoes now and the Nike+iPod system has been a great motivator. I’m going to build up slowly, using a program from “Galloway’s Book of Running”. Basically, short runs during the week and a long run on the weekends. I’m supposed to slow down for the long runs (1.5 to 2 minutes more per mile), but I like my normal pace. Still, I want the distance without injury, so I’ll give it a try.
The thing that I like the most about more recent developments in video games is the incorporation of more authentic motions and input devices. Guitar Hero is essentially the same game as Frequency and Amplitude (also for PS2), tadalafil except that you play with the guitar controller instead of a standard PS2 controller. With Donkey Konga, you play the drums. In Dance Dance Revolution, you move your feet on a dance pad. These games are more fun because of their authentic interactions. Or to put this another way, I hate when I can’t figure out how to play a game because I can’t remember the right combinations of arbitrary button combinations.

Today I got my Wii. The controller itself is the same device for many of the games, but what you do with the controller is authentic. I understood how to bowl and swing a bat right away. I forgot that I was using a controller at all and felt like part of the game. It was pretty amazing how quickly I was immersed in the experience and that made it all the more fun. I have a PS3 as well and the graphics are amazing, but I just don’t get the same feeling of interacting directly with the game. The controller is still a barrier between me and the gaming experience. Anyway, I need new games on both systems and I think each will have its strengths — but right now, the Wii appears to have the upper hand.
The Nike + iPod graph from my first run.
I went to the doctor this week and my cholesterol is not too great. I don’t get how that happens. I exercise and I’m a vegetarian. Andrew, gerontologist who eats the same stuff as I do, recipe has a cholesterol level around 150 and I’m above 200. Bad genes? You bet. Both of my parents are on cholesterol-lowering drugs. Maybe Lipitor is on the horizon, but I’m still going to try to manage it with diet and exercise. My doctor suggested flax oil and niacin-rich foods or a supplement, so I’ve started taking both niacin and flax daily to see if it helps. Andrew started taking them too. With my luck, my cholesterol will keep getting worse while Andrew will be able to bend space and time.
Today was just my second day with the Nike+ system and after I was done running 4 miles, remedy I got the normal “workout complete” message, more about but then Lance Armstrong’s voice came on and said something along the lines of “Congratulations, that was your longest run ever”. I don’t idolize Lance or anything, but I thought it was a nice touch. It’s good to recognize a new personal record because, frankly, I’m only competing with myself. A few limitations of the system:

  • I can’t enter historical data about myself. My actual longest-ever run was about 16 miles, back in the mid 1990’s. I might get there again some day, now that I can afford good shoes and can work out the time needed to do a 3-hour workout. But I can’t enter that personal record into the system or anything like my old high school times. Maybe that’s a good thing.
  • Warm-up and cool-down periods will mess up my data. I typically walk several laps to cool down — or I may just walk the whole time if I’ve injured something. The calories will still count, but the average-time calculations will mess up my overall averages while running. This doesn’t seem like a big deal, but one of my goals is to have several workouts under a 8:20 average mile, which would be killed with a cool-down time included. I may have to let this one go. I’m more interested in distance and calories anyway.
  • I can’t enter alternate forms of exercise. If I swim 20 laps one day, I can’t enter that workout data into my charts. Same goes for working out on exercise machines. A treadmill may work (I’m not sure and would be interested if anyone has tried it), but probably not a stair climber or elliptical machine.

When all is said and done though, it’s a great system and I’m very happy with it. Now, I need to go pick a power song.
Okay, cialis 40mg I’m no expert, but I took one recipe and did a lot of substitutions to replace things like egg yolks and butter with more heart-friendly ingredients. The sun butter and walnuts still have fat, but supposedly a more healthy kind. if you make a batch, let me know what you think:

3 cups Oatmeal
1.5 cups whole wheat flour
2 cups applesauce
4 egg whites
1.5 cups brown sugar
2 tsp vanilla
2 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp nutmeg
1 tsp baking soda
1.5 cups golden raisins
2 tbsp sun butter (like peanut butter, except made from sunflower seeds – use peanut butter if you like)
1 cup chopped walnuts

Don’t measure precisely — I never do. Mix it all up and use a tablespoon to scoop the mix onto a cookie sheet (I use parchment paper to prevent sticking). Cook for about 12 minutes at 350F. You know they’re done when they’re a little toasted on the surface and they should hold their shape after begin cooled for about 5 minutes.

edit: I reduced the cups of oatmeal from 4 to 3. The last batch came out a little too oaty.
A little over a week ago (January 27th), population health I joined Twitter along with a bunch of people from work. Basically, online it lets you answer the question “What are you doing now?” throughout the day. People post about breakfast, migraine the weather, server problems, and such, but I find that the most interesting posts are about thoughts or recent discoveries. In that sense, it’s more like a 10-second blog or nanoblog than simply a stream of what a bunch of people are doing. It’s a stream of human activity in its more broad sense.

Anyway, it’s coming up on two weeks and I have found that Twitter helps to organize my thoughts, I have a better sense of the people at the office, my boss and the CIO know what I’m doing with my time, and I have a hundred opportunities a day to talk to one of my colleagues based on something they find interesting and post as a tweet. I have a feeling that the same people who blog will be the ones that Twitter the most, which is a shame really, because I have no idea what the other people in my office are thinking on a daily basis. Overall, good stuff.
When I’ve heard about problems with using online text resources (PDFs and electronic textbooks), infection the focus seems to be on issues like contrast, resolution, and eyestrain. I just spent a couple of hours looking up some articles online and I think the problem has nothing to do with these technical issues (at least for me) since I spend a LOT of time reading and writing online. For me, the issue is how these resources feed into my activity.

When I write and need to use a lot of reference material. I don’t read the sources and then write all at once. I’m constantly moving back and forth between what I’m writing and what I’m reading, especially if I want to quote something correctly. If these are all on a computer screen, I don’t want to flip back and forth between applications — that breaks the flow of my writing activity.

This has been on my mind lately (and now parked in the blog) because I’ve spent a lot of time this weekend looking up reference articles on my laptop. I feel more constrained than usual because in my office, I have a dual-screen setup (laptop and external monitor). There, I can have all of my reading materials visible on one screen while I have the writing application open on another. I don’t feel the need to print out everything. On the other hand, this weekend, with only one screen, I feel cramped. At one point, I was actually using two computers: one to display reference material and the other to write.

In any case, I’ll have to look into this further. Ultimately, I prefer electronic reference materials, to save paper and ink, but also because they are searchable and easy to file away for future reference.
Since I need to exercise a lot to keep the weight off (and hopefully have an improvement in my BP and cholesterol), mycoplasmosis I’ve been running about four times per week. Last weekend, viagra I ran 8 miles and I’m thinking of running 10 this weekend. It’s only February and I could see myself easily getting up to a half-marathon in another month or so. I talked with Stevie yesterday and the idea of running a marathon came up. I think I can do it. The longest distance I’ve run before was 16 miles and I stopped because I was having some joint pain. At the time, illness I didn’t know how much of an impact that my shoes could have on getting injured. I thought that I just wasn’t built for long distances. Boredom was another problem. When you’re running for more than two hours alone and on the same route, it can be rather dull.

In any case, I have a good pair of shoes now and the Nike+iPod system has been a great motivator. I’m going to build up slowly, using a program from “Galloway’s Book of Running”. Basically, short runs during the week and a long run on the weekends. I’m supposed to slow down for the long runs (1.5 to 2 minutes more per mile), but I like my normal pace. Still, I want the distance without injury, so I’ll give it a try.
The thing that I like the most about more recent developments in video games is the incorporation of more authentic motions and input devices. Guitar Hero is essentially the same game as Frequency and Amplitude (also for PS2), tadalafil except that you play with the guitar controller instead of a standard PS2 controller. With Donkey Konga, you play the drums. In Dance Dance Revolution, you move your feet on a dance pad. These games are more fun because of their authentic interactions. Or to put this another way, I hate when I can’t figure out how to play a game because I can’t remember the right combinations of arbitrary button combinations.

Today I got my Wii. The controller itself is the same device for many of the games, but what you do with the controller is authentic. I understood how to bowl and swing a bat right away. I forgot that I was using a controller at all and felt like part of the game. It was pretty amazing how quickly I was immersed in the experience and that made it all the more fun. I have a PS3 as well and the graphics are amazing, but I just don’t get the same feeling of interacting directly with the game. The controller is still a barrier between me and the gaming experience. Anyway, I need new games on both systems and I think each will have its strengths — but right now, the Wii appears to have the upper hand.
For some other people who expressed interest in replicating my Nike+iPod setup, treat here are some useful links to the three purchases that you’d need to make. The total comes in around $140 with this combination.

  1. Refurbished 1GB iPod Nano (I got a 2GB one instead), this $79: Apple store, ed then select “Refurbished iPod” on the left for the listing. Any 1st generation or 2nd generation Nano will do.
  2. Nike+iPod Kit for about $29. The sensor fits into a Nike+ shoe, but if you don’t have Nike+ shoes, buy the sensor pouch/armband combination in #3
  3. Marware Armband and Sensor Pouch (they come together) for about $22. This armband is MUCH BETTER than the Nike one since it lets you see the screen on the Nano and comes with the sensor pouch so you don’t have to use the Nike+ shoes.

The Nike + iPod graph from my first run.
I went to the doctor this week and my cholesterol is not too great. I don’t get how that happens. I exercise and I’m a vegetarian. Andrew, gerontologist who eats the same stuff as I do, recipe has a cholesterol level around 150 and I’m above 200. Bad genes? You bet. Both of my parents are on cholesterol-lowering drugs. Maybe Lipitor is on the horizon, but I’m still going to try to manage it with diet and exercise. My doctor suggested flax oil and niacin-rich foods or a supplement, so I’ve started taking both niacin and flax daily to see if it helps. Andrew started taking them too. With my luck, my cholesterol will keep getting worse while Andrew will be able to bend space and time.
Today was just my second day with the Nike+ system and after I was done running 4 miles, remedy I got the normal “workout complete” message, more about but then Lance Armstrong’s voice came on and said something along the lines of “Congratulations, that was your longest run ever”. I don’t idolize Lance or anything, but I thought it was a nice touch. It’s good to recognize a new personal record because, frankly, I’m only competing with myself. A few limitations of the system:

  • I can’t enter historical data about myself. My actual longest-ever run was about 16 miles, back in the mid 1990’s. I might get there again some day, now that I can afford good shoes and can work out the time needed to do a 3-hour workout. But I can’t enter that personal record into the system or anything like my old high school times. Maybe that’s a good thing.
  • Warm-up and cool-down periods will mess up my data. I typically walk several laps to cool down — or I may just walk the whole time if I’ve injured something. The calories will still count, but the average-time calculations will mess up my overall averages while running. This doesn’t seem like a big deal, but one of my goals is to have several workouts under a 8:20 average mile, which would be killed with a cool-down time included. I may have to let this one go. I’m more interested in distance and calories anyway.
  • I can’t enter alternate forms of exercise. If I swim 20 laps one day, I can’t enter that workout data into my charts. Same goes for working out on exercise machines. A treadmill may work (I’m not sure and would be interested if anyone has tried it), but probably not a stair climber or elliptical machine.

When all is said and done though, it’s a great system and I’m very happy with it. Now, I need to go pick a power song.
Okay, cialis 40mg I’m no expert, but I took one recipe and did a lot of substitutions to replace things like egg yolks and butter with more heart-friendly ingredients. The sun butter and walnuts still have fat, but supposedly a more healthy kind. if you make a batch, let me know what you think:

3 cups Oatmeal
1.5 cups whole wheat flour
2 cups applesauce
4 egg whites
1.5 cups brown sugar
2 tsp vanilla
2 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp nutmeg
1 tsp baking soda
1.5 cups golden raisins
2 tbsp sun butter (like peanut butter, except made from sunflower seeds – use peanut butter if you like)
1 cup chopped walnuts

Don’t measure precisely — I never do. Mix it all up and use a tablespoon to scoop the mix onto a cookie sheet (I use parchment paper to prevent sticking). Cook for about 12 minutes at 350F. You know they’re done when they’re a little toasted on the surface and they should hold their shape after begin cooled for about 5 minutes.

edit: I reduced the cups of oatmeal from 4 to 3. The last batch came out a little too oaty.
A little over a week ago (January 27th), population health I joined Twitter along with a bunch of people from work. Basically, online it lets you answer the question “What are you doing now?” throughout the day. People post about breakfast, migraine the weather, server problems, and such, but I find that the most interesting posts are about thoughts or recent discoveries. In that sense, it’s more like a 10-second blog or nanoblog than simply a stream of what a bunch of people are doing. It’s a stream of human activity in its more broad sense.

Anyway, it’s coming up on two weeks and I have found that Twitter helps to organize my thoughts, I have a better sense of the people at the office, my boss and the CIO know what I’m doing with my time, and I have a hundred opportunities a day to talk to one of my colleagues based on something they find interesting and post as a tweet. I have a feeling that the same people who blog will be the ones that Twitter the most, which is a shame really, because I have no idea what the other people in my office are thinking on a daily basis. Overall, good stuff.
When I’ve heard about problems with using online text resources (PDFs and electronic textbooks), infection the focus seems to be on issues like contrast, resolution, and eyestrain. I just spent a couple of hours looking up some articles online and I think the problem has nothing to do with these technical issues (at least for me) since I spend a LOT of time reading and writing online. For me, the issue is how these resources feed into my activity.

When I write and need to use a lot of reference material. I don’t read the sources and then write all at once. I’m constantly moving back and forth between what I’m writing and what I’m reading, especially if I want to quote something correctly. If these are all on a computer screen, I don’t want to flip back and forth between applications — that breaks the flow of my writing activity.

This has been on my mind lately (and now parked in the blog) because I’ve spent a lot of time this weekend looking up reference articles on my laptop. I feel more constrained than usual because in my office, I have a dual-screen setup (laptop and external monitor). There, I can have all of my reading materials visible on one screen while I have the writing application open on another. I don’t feel the need to print out everything. On the other hand, this weekend, with only one screen, I feel cramped. At one point, I was actually using two computers: one to display reference material and the other to write.

In any case, I’ll have to look into this further. Ultimately, I prefer electronic reference materials, to save paper and ink, but also because they are searchable and easy to file away for future reference.
Since I need to exercise a lot to keep the weight off (and hopefully have an improvement in my BP and cholesterol), mycoplasmosis I’ve been running about four times per week. Last weekend, viagra I ran 8 miles and I’m thinking of running 10 this weekend. It’s only February and I could see myself easily getting up to a half-marathon in another month or so. I talked with Stevie yesterday and the idea of running a marathon came up. I think I can do it. The longest distance I’ve run before was 16 miles and I stopped because I was having some joint pain. At the time, illness I didn’t know how much of an impact that my shoes could have on getting injured. I thought that I just wasn’t built for long distances. Boredom was another problem. When you’re running for more than two hours alone and on the same route, it can be rather dull.

In any case, I have a good pair of shoes now and the Nike+iPod system has been a great motivator. I’m going to build up slowly, using a program from “Galloway’s Book of Running”. Basically, short runs during the week and a long run on the weekends. I’m supposed to slow down for the long runs (1.5 to 2 minutes more per mile), but I like my normal pace. Still, I want the distance without injury, so I’ll give it a try.
The thing that I like the most about more recent developments in video games is the incorporation of more authentic motions and input devices. Guitar Hero is essentially the same game as Frequency and Amplitude (also for PS2), tadalafil except that you play with the guitar controller instead of a standard PS2 controller. With Donkey Konga, you play the drums. In Dance Dance Revolution, you move your feet on a dance pad. These games are more fun because of their authentic interactions. Or to put this another way, I hate when I can’t figure out how to play a game because I can’t remember the right combinations of arbitrary button combinations.

Today I got my Wii. The controller itself is the same device for many of the games, but what you do with the controller is authentic. I understood how to bowl and swing a bat right away. I forgot that I was using a controller at all and felt like part of the game. It was pretty amazing how quickly I was immersed in the experience and that made it all the more fun. I have a PS3 as well and the graphics are amazing, but I just don’t get the same feeling of interacting directly with the game. The controller is still a barrier between me and the gaming experience. Anyway, I need new games on both systems and I think each will have its strengths — but right now, the Wii appears to have the upper hand.
For some other people who expressed interest in replicating my Nike+iPod setup, treat here are some useful links to the three purchases that you’d need to make. The total comes in around $140 with this combination.

  1. Refurbished 1GB iPod Nano (I got a 2GB one instead), this $79: Apple store, ed then select “Refurbished iPod” on the left for the listing. Any 1st generation or 2nd generation Nano will do.
  2. Nike+iPod Kit for about $29. The sensor fits into a Nike+ shoe, but if you don’t have Nike+ shoes, buy the sensor pouch/armband combination in #3
  3. Marware Armband and Sensor Pouch (they come together) for about $22. This armband is MUCH BETTER than the Nike one since it lets you see the screen on the Nano and comes with the sensor pouch so you don’t have to use the Nike+ shoes.

A few days ago, sildenafil I ran a Twitter Insta-Poll and asked people to complete the phrase “Twitter makes me _____“. One of the comments has been echoing in my head. Brad said “Twitter makes me feel like a cyborg”. Aren’t we cyborgs already?

I don’t mean in the Jean-Luc Picard way, buy where we’re all whirring gears and hive minded (although this is debatable). Rather, two of the defining characteristics of humanity is our ability to communicate complex thoughts and use tools to enhance our physical and mental abilities. Our cars, iPods, cell-phones, computers, and other devices are integrated seamlessly into our movement and consciousness. In fact, the more seamlessly, the better, hence Apple’s success. When I go for a run, most of the runners are wired — connected to the sounds of people they will never meet. We have gone so far as to begin internalizing several of these tools through implants that replace limbs and lost senses, regulate heartbeats, deliver medicine, and control symptoms. We have dental implants, metal plates, plastic hips, transplanted kidneys (and eyes, livers, skin, lungs, etc…), vaccinations, thousands of drugs and vitamins, laser-shaped eyes, tattoos, and piercings. The list goes on an on. We modify our culture. Culture modifies our bodies.

How are we not cyborgs already? Wikipedia and the blogosphere are the hive mind. Cell phones and Twitter are our opt-in telepathy. And those who opt-out are being pushed to the fringe. In Pennsylvania, the Amish are supposed to reject the use of technology, but even they are using cell phones these days.

The point that I’m trying to make is that humans are cyborgs by nature. We will continue to develop tools and integrate them into our culture, thereby advancing the human/machine species at a rate that out-paces any biological advancements that occur through the evolutionary process.
The Nike + iPod graph from my first run.
I went to the doctor this week and my cholesterol is not too great. I don’t get how that happens. I exercise and I’m a vegetarian. Andrew, gerontologist who eats the same stuff as I do, recipe has a cholesterol level around 150 and I’m above 200. Bad genes? You bet. Both of my parents are on cholesterol-lowering drugs. Maybe Lipitor is on the horizon, but I’m still going to try to manage it with diet and exercise. My doctor suggested flax oil and niacin-rich foods or a supplement, so I’ve started taking both niacin and flax daily to see if it helps. Andrew started taking them too. With my luck, my cholesterol will keep getting worse while Andrew will be able to bend space and time.
Today was just my second day with the Nike+ system and after I was done running 4 miles, remedy I got the normal “workout complete” message, more about but then Lance Armstrong’s voice came on and said something along the lines of “Congratulations, that was your longest run ever”. I don’t idolize Lance or anything, but I thought it was a nice touch. It’s good to recognize a new personal record because, frankly, I’m only competing with myself. A few limitations of the system:

  • I can’t enter historical data about myself. My actual longest-ever run was about 16 miles, back in the mid 1990’s. I might get there again some day, now that I can afford good shoes and can work out the time needed to do a 3-hour workout. But I can’t enter that personal record into the system or anything like my old high school times. Maybe that’s a good thing.
  • Warm-up and cool-down periods will mess up my data. I typically walk several laps to cool down — or I may just walk the whole time if I’ve injured something. The calories will still count, but the average-time calculations will mess up my overall averages while running. This doesn’t seem like a big deal, but one of my goals is to have several workouts under a 8:20 average mile, which would be killed with a cool-down time included. I may have to let this one go. I’m more interested in distance and calories anyway.
  • I can’t enter alternate forms of exercise. If I swim 20 laps one day, I can’t enter that workout data into my charts. Same goes for working out on exercise machines. A treadmill may work (I’m not sure and would be interested if anyone has tried it), but probably not a stair climber or elliptical machine.

When all is said and done though, it’s a great system and I’m very happy with it. Now, I need to go pick a power song.
Okay, cialis 40mg I’m no expert, but I took one recipe and did a lot of substitutions to replace things like egg yolks and butter with more heart-friendly ingredients. The sun butter and walnuts still have fat, but supposedly a more healthy kind. if you make a batch, let me know what you think:

3 cups Oatmeal
1.5 cups whole wheat flour
2 cups applesauce
4 egg whites
1.5 cups brown sugar
2 tsp vanilla
2 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp nutmeg
1 tsp baking soda
1.5 cups golden raisins
2 tbsp sun butter (like peanut butter, except made from sunflower seeds – use peanut butter if you like)
1 cup chopped walnuts

Don’t measure precisely — I never do. Mix it all up and use a tablespoon to scoop the mix onto a cookie sheet (I use parchment paper to prevent sticking). Cook for about 12 minutes at 350F. You know they’re done when they’re a little toasted on the surface and they should hold their shape after begin cooled for about 5 minutes.

edit: I reduced the cups of oatmeal from 4 to 3. The last batch came out a little too oaty.
A little over a week ago (January 27th), population health I joined Twitter along with a bunch of people from work. Basically, online it lets you answer the question “What are you doing now?” throughout the day. People post about breakfast, migraine the weather, server problems, and such, but I find that the most interesting posts are about thoughts or recent discoveries. In that sense, it’s more like a 10-second blog or nanoblog than simply a stream of what a bunch of people are doing. It’s a stream of human activity in its more broad sense.

Anyway, it’s coming up on two weeks and I have found that Twitter helps to organize my thoughts, I have a better sense of the people at the office, my boss and the CIO know what I’m doing with my time, and I have a hundred opportunities a day to talk to one of my colleagues based on something they find interesting and post as a tweet. I have a feeling that the same people who blog will be the ones that Twitter the most, which is a shame really, because I have no idea what the other people in my office are thinking on a daily basis. Overall, good stuff.
When I’ve heard about problems with using online text resources (PDFs and electronic textbooks), infection the focus seems to be on issues like contrast, resolution, and eyestrain. I just spent a couple of hours looking up some articles online and I think the problem has nothing to do with these technical issues (at least for me) since I spend a LOT of time reading and writing online. For me, the issue is how these resources feed into my activity.

When I write and need to use a lot of reference material. I don’t read the sources and then write all at once. I’m constantly moving back and forth between what I’m writing and what I’m reading, especially if I want to quote something correctly. If these are all on a computer screen, I don’t want to flip back and forth between applications — that breaks the flow of my writing activity.

This has been on my mind lately (and now parked in the blog) because I’ve spent a lot of time this weekend looking up reference articles on my laptop. I feel more constrained than usual because in my office, I have a dual-screen setup (laptop and external monitor). There, I can have all of my reading materials visible on one screen while I have the writing application open on another. I don’t feel the need to print out everything. On the other hand, this weekend, with only one screen, I feel cramped. At one point, I was actually using two computers: one to display reference material and the other to write.

In any case, I’ll have to look into this further. Ultimately, I prefer electronic reference materials, to save paper and ink, but also because they are searchable and easy to file away for future reference.
Since I need to exercise a lot to keep the weight off (and hopefully have an improvement in my BP and cholesterol), mycoplasmosis I’ve been running about four times per week. Last weekend, viagra I ran 8 miles and I’m thinking of running 10 this weekend. It’s only February and I could see myself easily getting up to a half-marathon in another month or so. I talked with Stevie yesterday and the idea of running a marathon came up. I think I can do it. The longest distance I’ve run before was 16 miles and I stopped because I was having some joint pain. At the time, illness I didn’t know how much of an impact that my shoes could have on getting injured. I thought that I just wasn’t built for long distances. Boredom was another problem. When you’re running for more than two hours alone and on the same route, it can be rather dull.

In any case, I have a good pair of shoes now and the Nike+iPod system has been a great motivator. I’m going to build up slowly, using a program from “Galloway’s Book of Running”. Basically, short runs during the week and a long run on the weekends. I’m supposed to slow down for the long runs (1.5 to 2 minutes more per mile), but I like my normal pace. Still, I want the distance without injury, so I’ll give it a try.
The thing that I like the most about more recent developments in video games is the incorporation of more authentic motions and input devices. Guitar Hero is essentially the same game as Frequency and Amplitude (also for PS2), tadalafil except that you play with the guitar controller instead of a standard PS2 controller. With Donkey Konga, you play the drums. In Dance Dance Revolution, you move your feet on a dance pad. These games are more fun because of their authentic interactions. Or to put this another way, I hate when I can’t figure out how to play a game because I can’t remember the right combinations of arbitrary button combinations.

Today I got my Wii. The controller itself is the same device for many of the games, but what you do with the controller is authentic. I understood how to bowl and swing a bat right away. I forgot that I was using a controller at all and felt like part of the game. It was pretty amazing how quickly I was immersed in the experience and that made it all the more fun. I have a PS3 as well and the graphics are amazing, but I just don’t get the same feeling of interacting directly with the game. The controller is still a barrier between me and the gaming experience. Anyway, I need new games on both systems and I think each will have its strengths — but right now, the Wii appears to have the upper hand.
For some other people who expressed interest in replicating my Nike+iPod setup, treat here are some useful links to the three purchases that you’d need to make. The total comes in around $140 with this combination.

  1. Refurbished 1GB iPod Nano (I got a 2GB one instead), this $79: Apple store, ed then select “Refurbished iPod” on the left for the listing. Any 1st generation or 2nd generation Nano will do.
  2. Nike+iPod Kit for about $29. The sensor fits into a Nike+ shoe, but if you don’t have Nike+ shoes, buy the sensor pouch/armband combination in #3
  3. Marware Armband and Sensor Pouch (they come together) for about $22. This armband is MUCH BETTER than the Nike one since it lets you see the screen on the Nano and comes with the sensor pouch so you don’t have to use the Nike+ shoes.

A few days ago, sildenafil I ran a Twitter Insta-Poll and asked people to complete the phrase “Twitter makes me _____“. One of the comments has been echoing in my head. Brad said “Twitter makes me feel like a cyborg”. Aren’t we cyborgs already?

I don’t mean in the Jean-Luc Picard way, buy where we’re all whirring gears and hive minded (although this is debatable). Rather, two of the defining characteristics of humanity is our ability to communicate complex thoughts and use tools to enhance our physical and mental abilities. Our cars, iPods, cell-phones, computers, and other devices are integrated seamlessly into our movement and consciousness. In fact, the more seamlessly, the better, hence Apple’s success. When I go for a run, most of the runners are wired — connected to the sounds of people they will never meet. We have gone so far as to begin internalizing several of these tools through implants that replace limbs and lost senses, regulate heartbeats, deliver medicine, and control symptoms. We have dental implants, metal plates, plastic hips, transplanted kidneys (and eyes, livers, skin, lungs, etc…), vaccinations, thousands of drugs and vitamins, laser-shaped eyes, tattoos, and piercings. The list goes on an on. We modify our culture. Culture modifies our bodies.

How are we not cyborgs already? Wikipedia and the blogosphere are the hive mind. Cell phones and Twitter are our opt-in telepathy. And those who opt-out are being pushed to the fringe. In Pennsylvania, the Amish are supposed to reject the use of technology, but even they are using cell phones these days.

The point that I’m trying to make is that humans are cyborgs by nature. We will continue to develop tools and integrate them into our culture, thereby advancing the human/machine species at a rate that out-paces any biological advancements that occur through the evolutionary process.
In 1994, anabolics I ran my first and only half-marathon race. Amazingly, oncology the results are available online. So when I was 24, generic I ran the 13.something miles at about a 8:18/mile pace. I haven’t run that long since then — maybe 16-18 miles in 1995, but I slacked off after that. In any case, it’s encouraging that my 14 mile run today was at a 8:41 pace. Not quite as fast as my half-marathon time, but I also didn’t have the race adrenaline going. If I run it this year, it would be nice to match or beat my old time.

While I was looking for this information, I ran across the race results for my cousin Dave (who is about 20 years older than me). If I remember correctly, he has run a marathon before and he’s still doing a bunch of runs every year. That’s encouraging for my long-term prospects. I haven’t talked to him in a while (he’s in Michigan)…I should give him a call.
The Nike + iPod graph from my first run.
I went to the doctor this week and my cholesterol is not too great. I don’t get how that happens. I exercise and I’m a vegetarian. Andrew, gerontologist who eats the same stuff as I do, recipe has a cholesterol level around 150 and I’m above 200. Bad genes? You bet. Both of my parents are on cholesterol-lowering drugs. Maybe Lipitor is on the horizon, but I’m still going to try to manage it with diet and exercise. My doctor suggested flax oil and niacin-rich foods or a supplement, so I’ve started taking both niacin and flax daily to see if it helps. Andrew started taking them too. With my luck, my cholesterol will keep getting worse while Andrew will be able to bend space and time.
Today was just my second day with the Nike+ system and after I was done running 4 miles, remedy I got the normal “workout complete” message, more about but then Lance Armstrong’s voice came on and said something along the lines of “Congratulations, that was your longest run ever”. I don’t idolize Lance or anything, but I thought it was a nice touch. It’s good to recognize a new personal record because, frankly, I’m only competing with myself. A few limitations of the system:

  • I can’t enter historical data about myself. My actual longest-ever run was about 16 miles, back in the mid 1990’s. I might get there again some day, now that I can afford good shoes and can work out the time needed to do a 3-hour workout. But I can’t enter that personal record into the system or anything like my old high school times. Maybe that’s a good thing.
  • Warm-up and cool-down periods will mess up my data. I typically walk several laps to cool down — or I may just walk the whole time if I’ve injured something. The calories will still count, but the average-time calculations will mess up my overall averages while running. This doesn’t seem like a big deal, but one of my goals is to have several workouts under a 8:20 average mile, which would be killed with a cool-down time included. I may have to let this one go. I’m more interested in distance and calories anyway.
  • I can’t enter alternate forms of exercise. If I swim 20 laps one day, I can’t enter that workout data into my charts. Same goes for working out on exercise machines. A treadmill may work (I’m not sure and would be interested if anyone has tried it), but probably not a stair climber or elliptical machine.

When all is said and done though, it’s a great system and I’m very happy with it. Now, I need to go pick a power song.
Okay, cialis 40mg I’m no expert, but I took one recipe and did a lot of substitutions to replace things like egg yolks and butter with more heart-friendly ingredients. The sun butter and walnuts still have fat, but supposedly a more healthy kind. if you make a batch, let me know what you think:

3 cups Oatmeal
1.5 cups whole wheat flour
2 cups applesauce
4 egg whites
1.5 cups brown sugar
2 tsp vanilla
2 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp nutmeg
1 tsp baking soda
1.5 cups golden raisins
2 tbsp sun butter (like peanut butter, except made from sunflower seeds – use peanut butter if you like)
1 cup chopped walnuts

Don’t measure precisely — I never do. Mix it all up and use a tablespoon to scoop the mix onto a cookie sheet (I use parchment paper to prevent sticking). Cook for about 12 minutes at 350F. You know they’re done when they’re a little toasted on the surface and they should hold their shape after begin cooled for about 5 minutes.

edit: I reduced the cups of oatmeal from 4 to 3. The last batch came out a little too oaty.
A little over a week ago (January 27th), population health I joined Twitter along with a bunch of people from work. Basically, online it lets you answer the question “What are you doing now?” throughout the day. People post about breakfast, migraine the weather, server problems, and such, but I find that the most interesting posts are about thoughts or recent discoveries. In that sense, it’s more like a 10-second blog or nanoblog than simply a stream of what a bunch of people are doing. It’s a stream of human activity in its more broad sense.

Anyway, it’s coming up on two weeks and I have found that Twitter helps to organize my thoughts, I have a better sense of the people at the office, my boss and the CIO know what I’m doing with my time, and I have a hundred opportunities a day to talk to one of my colleagues based on something they find interesting and post as a tweet. I have a feeling that the same people who blog will be the ones that Twitter the most, which is a shame really, because I have no idea what the other people in my office are thinking on a daily basis. Overall, good stuff.
When I’ve heard about problems with using online text resources (PDFs and electronic textbooks), infection the focus seems to be on issues like contrast, resolution, and eyestrain. I just spent a couple of hours looking up some articles online and I think the problem has nothing to do with these technical issues (at least for me) since I spend a LOT of time reading and writing online. For me, the issue is how these resources feed into my activity.

When I write and need to use a lot of reference material. I don’t read the sources and then write all at once. I’m constantly moving back and forth between what I’m writing and what I’m reading, especially if I want to quote something correctly. If these are all on a computer screen, I don’t want to flip back and forth between applications — that breaks the flow of my writing activity.

This has been on my mind lately (and now parked in the blog) because I’ve spent a lot of time this weekend looking up reference articles on my laptop. I feel more constrained than usual because in my office, I have a dual-screen setup (laptop and external monitor). There, I can have all of my reading materials visible on one screen while I have the writing application open on another. I don’t feel the need to print out everything. On the other hand, this weekend, with only one screen, I feel cramped. At one point, I was actually using two computers: one to display reference material and the other to write.

In any case, I’ll have to look into this further. Ultimately, I prefer electronic reference materials, to save paper and ink, but also because they are searchable and easy to file away for future reference.
Since I need to exercise a lot to keep the weight off (and hopefully have an improvement in my BP and cholesterol), mycoplasmosis I’ve been running about four times per week. Last weekend, viagra I ran 8 miles and I’m thinking of running 10 this weekend. It’s only February and I could see myself easily getting up to a half-marathon in another month or so. I talked with Stevie yesterday and the idea of running a marathon came up. I think I can do it. The longest distance I’ve run before was 16 miles and I stopped because I was having some joint pain. At the time, illness I didn’t know how much of an impact that my shoes could have on getting injured. I thought that I just wasn’t built for long distances. Boredom was another problem. When you’re running for more than two hours alone and on the same route, it can be rather dull.

In any case, I have a good pair of shoes now and the Nike+iPod system has been a great motivator. I’m going to build up slowly, using a program from “Galloway’s Book of Running”. Basically, short runs during the week and a long run on the weekends. I’m supposed to slow down for the long runs (1.5 to 2 minutes more per mile), but I like my normal pace. Still, I want the distance without injury, so I’ll give it a try.
The thing that I like the most about more recent developments in video games is the incorporation of more authentic motions and input devices. Guitar Hero is essentially the same game as Frequency and Amplitude (also for PS2), tadalafil except that you play with the guitar controller instead of a standard PS2 controller. With Donkey Konga, you play the drums. In Dance Dance Revolution, you move your feet on a dance pad. These games are more fun because of their authentic interactions. Or to put this another way, I hate when I can’t figure out how to play a game because I can’t remember the right combinations of arbitrary button combinations.

Today I got my Wii. The controller itself is the same device for many of the games, but what you do with the controller is authentic. I understood how to bowl and swing a bat right away. I forgot that I was using a controller at all and felt like part of the game. It was pretty amazing how quickly I was immersed in the experience and that made it all the more fun. I have a PS3 as well and the graphics are amazing, but I just don’t get the same feeling of interacting directly with the game. The controller is still a barrier between me and the gaming experience. Anyway, I need new games on both systems and I think each will have its strengths — but right now, the Wii appears to have the upper hand.
For some other people who expressed interest in replicating my Nike+iPod setup, treat here are some useful links to the three purchases that you’d need to make. The total comes in around $140 with this combination.

  1. Refurbished 1GB iPod Nano (I got a 2GB one instead), this $79: Apple store, ed then select “Refurbished iPod” on the left for the listing. Any 1st generation or 2nd generation Nano will do.
  2. Nike+iPod Kit for about $29. The sensor fits into a Nike+ shoe, but if you don’t have Nike+ shoes, buy the sensor pouch/armband combination in #3
  3. Marware Armband and Sensor Pouch (they come together) for about $22. This armband is MUCH BETTER than the Nike one since it lets you see the screen on the Nano and comes with the sensor pouch so you don’t have to use the Nike+ shoes.

A few days ago, sildenafil I ran a Twitter Insta-Poll and asked people to complete the phrase “Twitter makes me _____“. One of the comments has been echoing in my head. Brad said “Twitter makes me feel like a cyborg”. Aren’t we cyborgs already?

I don’t mean in the Jean-Luc Picard way, buy where we’re all whirring gears and hive minded (although this is debatable). Rather, two of the defining characteristics of humanity is our ability to communicate complex thoughts and use tools to enhance our physical and mental abilities. Our cars, iPods, cell-phones, computers, and other devices are integrated seamlessly into our movement and consciousness. In fact, the more seamlessly, the better, hence Apple’s success. When I go for a run, most of the runners are wired — connected to the sounds of people they will never meet. We have gone so far as to begin internalizing several of these tools through implants that replace limbs and lost senses, regulate heartbeats, deliver medicine, and control symptoms. We have dental implants, metal plates, plastic hips, transplanted kidneys (and eyes, livers, skin, lungs, etc…), vaccinations, thousands of drugs and vitamins, laser-shaped eyes, tattoos, and piercings. The list goes on an on. We modify our culture. Culture modifies our bodies.

How are we not cyborgs already? Wikipedia and the blogosphere are the hive mind. Cell phones and Twitter are our opt-in telepathy. And those who opt-out are being pushed to the fringe. In Pennsylvania, the Amish are supposed to reject the use of technology, but even they are using cell phones these days.

The point that I’m trying to make is that humans are cyborgs by nature. We will continue to develop tools and integrate them into our culture, thereby advancing the human/machine species at a rate that out-paces any biological advancements that occur through the evolutionary process.
In 1994, anabolics I ran my first and only half-marathon race. Amazingly, oncology the results are available online. So when I was 24, generic I ran the 13.something miles at about a 8:18/mile pace. I haven’t run that long since then — maybe 16-18 miles in 1995, but I slacked off after that. In any case, it’s encouraging that my 14 mile run today was at a 8:41 pace. Not quite as fast as my half-marathon time, but I also didn’t have the race adrenaline going. If I run it this year, it would be nice to match or beat my old time.

While I was looking for this information, I ran across the race results for my cousin Dave (who is about 20 years older than me). If I remember correctly, he has run a marathon before and he’s still doing a bunch of runs every year. That’s encouraging for my long-term prospects. I haven’t talked to him in a while (he’s in Michigan)…I should give him a call.
Last week, seek I was talking to Andrew about lectures and I made the comment “lectures are dead”, sildenafil thinking about some of the bad ones from my own educational experience — where someone is quacking at the front of the classroom with no interaction with students. Then Andrew told me that he was about to do a guest lecture and explained me what he had in mind.

Essentially, he picked some YouTube videos that are related to HIV prevention in some manner and then used them to break the ice with his class and have discussions about the content and the cultural context of the message. If this is how digital natives interpret “lecture”, then they are anything but dead.

[These are explicit – you’ve been warned. Legality is also a question of course — but they’re hosted on YouTube. I’ll let the Google lawyers work that out.]


The Nike + iPod graph from my first run.
I went to the doctor this week and my cholesterol is not too great. I don’t get how that happens. I exercise and I’m a vegetarian. Andrew, gerontologist who eats the same stuff as I do, recipe has a cholesterol level around 150 and I’m above 200. Bad genes? You bet. Both of my parents are on cholesterol-lowering drugs. Maybe Lipitor is on the horizon, but I’m still going to try to manage it with diet and exercise. My doctor suggested flax oil and niacin-rich foods or a supplement, so I’ve started taking both niacin and flax daily to see if it helps. Andrew started taking them too. With my luck, my cholesterol will keep getting worse while Andrew will be able to bend space and time.
Today was just my second day with the Nike+ system and after I was done running 4 miles, remedy I got the normal “workout complete” message, more about but then Lance Armstrong’s voice came on and said something along the lines of “Congratulations, that was your longest run ever”. I don’t idolize Lance or anything, but I thought it was a nice touch. It’s good to recognize a new personal record because, frankly, I’m only competing with myself. A few limitations of the system:

  • I can’t enter historical data about myself. My actual longest-ever run was about 16 miles, back in the mid 1990’s. I might get there again some day, now that I can afford good shoes and can work out the time needed to do a 3-hour workout. But I can’t enter that personal record into the system or anything like my old high school times. Maybe that’s a good thing.
  • Warm-up and cool-down periods will mess up my data. I typically walk several laps to cool down — or I may just walk the whole time if I’ve injured something. The calories will still count, but the average-time calculations will mess up my overall averages while running. This doesn’t seem like a big deal, but one of my goals is to have several workouts under a 8:20 average mile, which would be killed with a cool-down time included. I may have to let this one go. I’m more interested in distance and calories anyway.
  • I can’t enter alternate forms of exercise. If I swim 20 laps one day, I can’t enter that workout data into my charts. Same goes for working out on exercise machines. A treadmill may work (I’m not sure and would be interested if anyone has tried it), but probably not a stair climber or elliptical machine.

When all is said and done though, it’s a great system and I’m very happy with it. Now, I need to go pick a power song.
Okay, cialis 40mg I’m no expert, but I took one recipe and did a lot of substitutions to replace things like egg yolks and butter with more heart-friendly ingredients. The sun butter and walnuts still have fat, but supposedly a more healthy kind. if you make a batch, let me know what you think:

3 cups Oatmeal
1.5 cups whole wheat flour
2 cups applesauce
4 egg whites
1.5 cups brown sugar
2 tsp vanilla
2 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp nutmeg
1 tsp baking soda
1.5 cups golden raisins
2 tbsp sun butter (like peanut butter, except made from sunflower seeds – use peanut butter if you like)
1 cup chopped walnuts

Don’t measure precisely — I never do. Mix it all up and use a tablespoon to scoop the mix onto a cookie sheet (I use parchment paper to prevent sticking). Cook for about 12 minutes at 350F. You know they’re done when they’re a little toasted on the surface and they should hold their shape after begin cooled for about 5 minutes.

edit: I reduced the cups of oatmeal from 4 to 3. The last batch came out a little too oaty.
A little over a week ago (January 27th), population health I joined Twitter along with a bunch of people from work. Basically, online it lets you answer the question “What are you doing now?” throughout the day. People post about breakfast, migraine the weather, server problems, and such, but I find that the most interesting posts are about thoughts or recent discoveries. In that sense, it’s more like a 10-second blog or nanoblog than simply a stream of what a bunch of people are doing. It’s a stream of human activity in its more broad sense.

Anyway, it’s coming up on two weeks and I have found that Twitter helps to organize my thoughts, I have a better sense of the people at the office, my boss and the CIO know what I’m doing with my time, and I have a hundred opportunities a day to talk to one of my colleagues based on something they find interesting and post as a tweet. I have a feeling that the same people who blog will be the ones that Twitter the most, which is a shame really, because I have no idea what the other people in my office are thinking on a daily basis. Overall, good stuff.
When I’ve heard about problems with using online text resources (PDFs and electronic textbooks), infection the focus seems to be on issues like contrast, resolution, and eyestrain. I just spent a couple of hours looking up some articles online and I think the problem has nothing to do with these technical issues (at least for me) since I spend a LOT of time reading and writing online. For me, the issue is how these resources feed into my activity.

When I write and need to use a lot of reference material. I don’t read the sources and then write all at once. I’m constantly moving back and forth between what I’m writing and what I’m reading, especially if I want to quote something correctly. If these are all on a computer screen, I don’t want to flip back and forth between applications — that breaks the flow of my writing activity.

This has been on my mind lately (and now parked in the blog) because I’ve spent a lot of time this weekend looking up reference articles on my laptop. I feel more constrained than usual because in my office, I have a dual-screen setup (laptop and external monitor). There, I can have all of my reading materials visible on one screen while I have the writing application open on another. I don’t feel the need to print out everything. On the other hand, this weekend, with only one screen, I feel cramped. At one point, I was actually using two computers: one to display reference material and the other to write.

In any case, I’ll have to look into this further. Ultimately, I prefer electronic reference materials, to save paper and ink, but also because they are searchable and easy to file away for future reference.
Since I need to exercise a lot to keep the weight off (and hopefully have an improvement in my BP and cholesterol), mycoplasmosis I’ve been running about four times per week. Last weekend, viagra I ran 8 miles and I’m thinking of running 10 this weekend. It’s only February and I could see myself easily getting up to a half-marathon in another month or so. I talked with Stevie yesterday and the idea of running a marathon came up. I think I can do it. The longest distance I’ve run before was 16 miles and I stopped because I was having some joint pain. At the time, illness I didn’t know how much of an impact that my shoes could have on getting injured. I thought that I just wasn’t built for long distances. Boredom was another problem. When you’re running for more than two hours alone and on the same route, it can be rather dull.

In any case, I have a good pair of shoes now and the Nike+iPod system has been a great motivator. I’m going to build up slowly, using a program from “Galloway’s Book of Running”. Basically, short runs during the week and a long run on the weekends. I’m supposed to slow down for the long runs (1.5 to 2 minutes more per mile), but I like my normal pace. Still, I want the distance without injury, so I’ll give it a try.
The thing that I like the most about more recent developments in video games is the incorporation of more authentic motions and input devices. Guitar Hero is essentially the same game as Frequency and Amplitude (also for PS2), tadalafil except that you play with the guitar controller instead of a standard PS2 controller. With Donkey Konga, you play the drums. In Dance Dance Revolution, you move your feet on a dance pad. These games are more fun because of their authentic interactions. Or to put this another way, I hate when I can’t figure out how to play a game because I can’t remember the right combinations of arbitrary button combinations.

Today I got my Wii. The controller itself is the same device for many of the games, but what you do with the controller is authentic. I understood how to bowl and swing a bat right away. I forgot that I was using a controller at all and felt like part of the game. It was pretty amazing how quickly I was immersed in the experience and that made it all the more fun. I have a PS3 as well and the graphics are amazing, but I just don’t get the same feeling of interacting directly with the game. The controller is still a barrier between me and the gaming experience. Anyway, I need new games on both systems and I think each will have its strengths — but right now, the Wii appears to have the upper hand.
For some other people who expressed interest in replicating my Nike+iPod setup, treat here are some useful links to the three purchases that you’d need to make. The total comes in around $140 with this combination.

  1. Refurbished 1GB iPod Nano (I got a 2GB one instead), this $79: Apple store, ed then select “Refurbished iPod” on the left for the listing. Any 1st generation or 2nd generation Nano will do.
  2. Nike+iPod Kit for about $29. The sensor fits into a Nike+ shoe, but if you don’t have Nike+ shoes, buy the sensor pouch/armband combination in #3
  3. Marware Armband and Sensor Pouch (they come together) for about $22. This armband is MUCH BETTER than the Nike one since it lets you see the screen on the Nano and comes with the sensor pouch so you don’t have to use the Nike+ shoes.

A few days ago, sildenafil I ran a Twitter Insta-Poll and asked people to complete the phrase “Twitter makes me _____“. One of the comments has been echoing in my head. Brad said “Twitter makes me feel like a cyborg”. Aren’t we cyborgs already?

I don’t mean in the Jean-Luc Picard way, buy where we’re all whirring gears and hive minded (although this is debatable). Rather, two of the defining characteristics of humanity is our ability to communicate complex thoughts and use tools to enhance our physical and mental abilities. Our cars, iPods, cell-phones, computers, and other devices are integrated seamlessly into our movement and consciousness. In fact, the more seamlessly, the better, hence Apple’s success. When I go for a run, most of the runners are wired — connected to the sounds of people they will never meet. We have gone so far as to begin internalizing several of these tools through implants that replace limbs and lost senses, regulate heartbeats, deliver medicine, and control symptoms. We have dental implants, metal plates, plastic hips, transplanted kidneys (and eyes, livers, skin, lungs, etc…), vaccinations, thousands of drugs and vitamins, laser-shaped eyes, tattoos, and piercings. The list goes on an on. We modify our culture. Culture modifies our bodies.

How are we not cyborgs already? Wikipedia and the blogosphere are the hive mind. Cell phones and Twitter are our opt-in telepathy. And those who opt-out are being pushed to the fringe. In Pennsylvania, the Amish are supposed to reject the use of technology, but even they are using cell phones these days.

The point that I’m trying to make is that humans are cyborgs by nature. We will continue to develop tools and integrate them into our culture, thereby advancing the human/machine species at a rate that out-paces any biological advancements that occur through the evolutionary process.
In 1994, anabolics I ran my first and only half-marathon race. Amazingly, oncology the results are available online. So when I was 24, generic I ran the 13.something miles at about a 8:18/mile pace. I haven’t run that long since then — maybe 16-18 miles in 1995, but I slacked off after that. In any case, it’s encouraging that my 14 mile run today was at a 8:41 pace. Not quite as fast as my half-marathon time, but I also didn’t have the race adrenaline going. If I run it this year, it would be nice to match or beat my old time.

While I was looking for this information, I ran across the race results for my cousin Dave (who is about 20 years older than me). If I remember correctly, he has run a marathon before and he’s still doing a bunch of runs every year. That’s encouraging for my long-term prospects. I haven’t talked to him in a while (he’s in Michigan)…I should give him a call.
Last week, seek I was talking to Andrew about lectures and I made the comment “lectures are dead”, sildenafil thinking about some of the bad ones from my own educational experience — where someone is quacking at the front of the classroom with no interaction with students. Then Andrew told me that he was about to do a guest lecture and explained me what he had in mind.

Essentially, he picked some YouTube videos that are related to HIV prevention in some manner and then used them to break the ice with his class and have discussions about the content and the cultural context of the message. If this is how digital natives interpret “lecture”, then they are anything but dead.

[These are explicit – you’ve been warned. Legality is also a question of course — but they’re hosted on YouTube. I’ll let the Google lawyers work that out.]


The Philadelphia Marathon is tomorrow.  I can hardly believe it.  I thought I’d do a little brain-dump to capture my pre-race thoughts.

Last winter, psychiatrist I  read a story in Wired about Dean Karanzes, an ultramarathon runner and since the weather was so nice, I started running around the neighborhood with my dog.  I also started running on the indoor track over lunch and on the weekends as a way to manage stress.  I added some miles without much of a problem and started running with Jeff (a co-worker). 

When we got up to about 10 miles, we started talking about doing a marathon.  Two of my cousins have done them before (Doug and Dave), plus we know several other people who have done them (Ann, Stevie, Nancy, among others). 

I got a Nike+ system to chart my progress, which was a motivator for a while, but now I don’t need it to get me out the door and on the road.  I also bought two books that I recommend.  The first is the Non-Runner’s Marathon Trainer, which is a nice roadmap to take someone who can run a 5K up to marathon level in about 4 months.  The other is Dean Karnazes’s book, Ultramarathon Man, which I found to be inspirational.

The longest run that I have done so far is about 20 miles, which should be sufficient to be able to push through to 26.  I’m having some IT-band problems, but I have a strap that is supposed to help and I’ve been stretching a lot more lately.  I love running in cooler weather and it’s supposed to be in the 30’s and 40’s tomorrow morning, so that’s cool enough (maybe too cold, but we’ll see).  I’ll be running in some relatively new shoes and a complete set of Undergear that Andrew bought me as an early Birthday present.

So yesterday, I drove down to Philly to check into the hotel and pick up my and Jeff’s packets.  I stayed for about an hour at the Health and Fitness Expo that they had and it was pretty nice.  I bought a few things: Power Gel blocks (like a sports drink in gummy form) and the IT-band strap for my knee.  I also picked up some information about a couple of marathons in May, in case I decide to do another one in the Spring.  I drove back last night so I could be around for Andrew’s Mom’s birthday party and bring him back to Philly with me.  I have a good idea of how to get back to the hotel tonight and where to go to start the marathon, so the trip down was worth the time.

So today is a lot of drinking and stretching, the birthday party, drive to Philly, crash at the hotel, and hopefully get a little sleep before running tomorrow.

Powered by ScribeFire.

The Nike + iPod graph from my first run.
I went to the doctor this week and my cholesterol is not too great. I don’t get how that happens. I exercise and I’m a vegetarian. Andrew, gerontologist who eats the same stuff as I do, recipe has a cholesterol level around 150 and I’m above 200. Bad genes? You bet. Both of my parents are on cholesterol-lowering drugs. Maybe Lipitor is on the horizon, but I’m still going to try to manage it with diet and exercise. My doctor suggested flax oil and niacin-rich foods or a supplement, so I’ve started taking both niacin and flax daily to see if it helps. Andrew started taking them too. With my luck, my cholesterol will keep getting worse while Andrew will be able to bend space and time.
Today was just my second day with the Nike+ system and after I was done running 4 miles, remedy I got the normal “workout complete” message, more about but then Lance Armstrong’s voice came on and said something along the lines of “Congratulations, that was your longest run ever”. I don’t idolize Lance or anything, but I thought it was a nice touch. It’s good to recognize a new personal record because, frankly, I’m only competing with myself. A few limitations of the system:

  • I can’t enter historical data about myself. My actual longest-ever run was about 16 miles, back in the mid 1990’s. I might get there again some day, now that I can afford good shoes and can work out the time needed to do a 3-hour workout. But I can’t enter that personal record into the system or anything like my old high school times. Maybe that’s a good thing.
  • Warm-up and cool-down periods will mess up my data. I typically walk several laps to cool down — or I may just walk the whole time if I’ve injured something. The calories will still count, but the average-time calculations will mess up my overall averages while running. This doesn’t seem like a big deal, but one of my goals is to have several workouts under a 8:20 average mile, which would be killed with a cool-down time included. I may have to let this one go. I’m more interested in distance and calories anyway.
  • I can’t enter alternate forms of exercise. If I swim 20 laps one day, I can’t enter that workout data into my charts. Same goes for working out on exercise machines. A treadmill may work (I’m not sure and would be interested if anyone has tried it), but probably not a stair climber or elliptical machine.

When all is said and done though, it’s a great system and I’m very happy with it. Now, I need to go pick a power song.
Okay, cialis 40mg I’m no expert, but I took one recipe and did a lot of substitutions to replace things like egg yolks and butter with more heart-friendly ingredients. The sun butter and walnuts still have fat, but supposedly a more healthy kind. if you make a batch, let me know what you think:

3 cups Oatmeal
1.5 cups whole wheat flour
2 cups applesauce
4 egg whites
1.5 cups brown sugar
2 tsp vanilla
2 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp nutmeg
1 tsp baking soda
1.5 cups golden raisins
2 tbsp sun butter (like peanut butter, except made from sunflower seeds – use peanut butter if you like)
1 cup chopped walnuts

Don’t measure precisely — I never do. Mix it all up and use a tablespoon to scoop the mix onto a cookie sheet (I use parchment paper to prevent sticking). Cook for about 12 minutes at 350F. You know they’re done when they’re a little toasted on the surface and they should hold their shape after begin cooled for about 5 minutes.

edit: I reduced the cups of oatmeal from 4 to 3. The last batch came out a little too oaty.
A little over a week ago (January 27th), population health I joined Twitter along with a bunch of people from work. Basically, online it lets you answer the question “What are you doing now?” throughout the day. People post about breakfast, migraine the weather, server problems, and such, but I find that the most interesting posts are about thoughts or recent discoveries. In that sense, it’s more like a 10-second blog or nanoblog than simply a stream of what a bunch of people are doing. It’s a stream of human activity in its more broad sense.

Anyway, it’s coming up on two weeks and I have found that Twitter helps to organize my thoughts, I have a better sense of the people at the office, my boss and the CIO know what I’m doing with my time, and I have a hundred opportunities a day to talk to one of my colleagues based on something they find interesting and post as a tweet. I have a feeling that the same people who blog will be the ones that Twitter the most, which is a shame really, because I have no idea what the other people in my office are thinking on a daily basis. Overall, good stuff.
When I’ve heard about problems with using online text resources (PDFs and electronic textbooks), infection the focus seems to be on issues like contrast, resolution, and eyestrain. I just spent a couple of hours looking up some articles online and I think the problem has nothing to do with these technical issues (at least for me) since I spend a LOT of time reading and writing online. For me, the issue is how these resources feed into my activity.

When I write and need to use a lot of reference material. I don’t read the sources and then write all at once. I’m constantly moving back and forth between what I’m writing and what I’m reading, especially if I want to quote something correctly. If these are all on a computer screen, I don’t want to flip back and forth between applications — that breaks the flow of my writing activity.

This has been on my mind lately (and now parked in the blog) because I’ve spent a lot of time this weekend looking up reference articles on my laptop. I feel more constrained than usual because in my office, I have a dual-screen setup (laptop and external monitor). There, I can have all of my reading materials visible on one screen while I have the writing application open on another. I don’t feel the need to print out everything. On the other hand, this weekend, with only one screen, I feel cramped. At one point, I was actually using two computers: one to display reference material and the other to write.

In any case, I’ll have to look into this further. Ultimately, I prefer electronic reference materials, to save paper and ink, but also because they are searchable and easy to file away for future reference.
Since I need to exercise a lot to keep the weight off (and hopefully have an improvement in my BP and cholesterol), mycoplasmosis I’ve been running about four times per week. Last weekend, viagra I ran 8 miles and I’m thinking of running 10 this weekend. It’s only February and I could see myself easily getting up to a half-marathon in another month or so. I talked with Stevie yesterday and the idea of running a marathon came up. I think I can do it. The longest distance I’ve run before was 16 miles and I stopped because I was having some joint pain. At the time, illness I didn’t know how much of an impact that my shoes could have on getting injured. I thought that I just wasn’t built for long distances. Boredom was another problem. When you’re running for more than two hours alone and on the same route, it can be rather dull.

In any case, I have a good pair of shoes now and the Nike+iPod system has been a great motivator. I’m going to build up slowly, using a program from “Galloway’s Book of Running”. Basically, short runs during the week and a long run on the weekends. I’m supposed to slow down for the long runs (1.5 to 2 minutes more per mile), but I like my normal pace. Still, I want the distance without injury, so I’ll give it a try.
The thing that I like the most about more recent developments in video games is the incorporation of more authentic motions and input devices. Guitar Hero is essentially the same game as Frequency and Amplitude (also for PS2), tadalafil except that you play with the guitar controller instead of a standard PS2 controller. With Donkey Konga, you play the drums. In Dance Dance Revolution, you move your feet on a dance pad. These games are more fun because of their authentic interactions. Or to put this another way, I hate when I can’t figure out how to play a game because I can’t remember the right combinations of arbitrary button combinations.

Today I got my Wii. The controller itself is the same device for many of the games, but what you do with the controller is authentic. I understood how to bowl and swing a bat right away. I forgot that I was using a controller at all and felt like part of the game. It was pretty amazing how quickly I was immersed in the experience and that made it all the more fun. I have a PS3 as well and the graphics are amazing, but I just don’t get the same feeling of interacting directly with the game. The controller is still a barrier between me and the gaming experience. Anyway, I need new games on both systems and I think each will have its strengths — but right now, the Wii appears to have the upper hand.
For some other people who expressed interest in replicating my Nike+iPod setup, treat here are some useful links to the three purchases that you’d need to make. The total comes in around $140 with this combination.

  1. Refurbished 1GB iPod Nano (I got a 2GB one instead), this $79: Apple store, ed then select “Refurbished iPod” on the left for the listing. Any 1st generation or 2nd generation Nano will do.
  2. Nike+iPod Kit for about $29. The sensor fits into a Nike+ shoe, but if you don’t have Nike+ shoes, buy the sensor pouch/armband combination in #3
  3. Marware Armband and Sensor Pouch (they come together) for about $22. This armband is MUCH BETTER than the Nike one since it lets you see the screen on the Nano and comes with the sensor pouch so you don’t have to use the Nike+ shoes.

A few days ago, sildenafil I ran a Twitter Insta-Poll and asked people to complete the phrase “Twitter makes me _____“. One of the comments has been echoing in my head. Brad said “Twitter makes me feel like a cyborg”. Aren’t we cyborgs already?

I don’t mean in the Jean-Luc Picard way, buy where we’re all whirring gears and hive minded (although this is debatable). Rather, two of the defining characteristics of humanity is our ability to communicate complex thoughts and use tools to enhance our physical and mental abilities. Our cars, iPods, cell-phones, computers, and other devices are integrated seamlessly into our movement and consciousness. In fact, the more seamlessly, the better, hence Apple’s success. When I go for a run, most of the runners are wired — connected to the sounds of people they will never meet. We have gone so far as to begin internalizing several of these tools through implants that replace limbs and lost senses, regulate heartbeats, deliver medicine, and control symptoms. We have dental implants, metal plates, plastic hips, transplanted kidneys (and eyes, livers, skin, lungs, etc…), vaccinations, thousands of drugs and vitamins, laser-shaped eyes, tattoos, and piercings. The list goes on an on. We modify our culture. Culture modifies our bodies.

How are we not cyborgs already? Wikipedia and the blogosphere are the hive mind. Cell phones and Twitter are our opt-in telepathy. And those who opt-out are being pushed to the fringe. In Pennsylvania, the Amish are supposed to reject the use of technology, but even they are using cell phones these days.

The point that I’m trying to make is that humans are cyborgs by nature. We will continue to develop tools and integrate them into our culture, thereby advancing the human/machine species at a rate that out-paces any biological advancements that occur through the evolutionary process.
In 1994, anabolics I ran my first and only half-marathon race. Amazingly, oncology the results are available online. So when I was 24, generic I ran the 13.something miles at about a 8:18/mile pace. I haven’t run that long since then — maybe 16-18 miles in 1995, but I slacked off after that. In any case, it’s encouraging that my 14 mile run today was at a 8:41 pace. Not quite as fast as my half-marathon time, but I also didn’t have the race adrenaline going. If I run it this year, it would be nice to match or beat my old time.

While I was looking for this information, I ran across the race results for my cousin Dave (who is about 20 years older than me). If I remember correctly, he has run a marathon before and he’s still doing a bunch of runs every year. That’s encouraging for my long-term prospects. I haven’t talked to him in a while (he’s in Michigan)…I should give him a call.
Last week, seek I was talking to Andrew about lectures and I made the comment “lectures are dead”, sildenafil thinking about some of the bad ones from my own educational experience — where someone is quacking at the front of the classroom with no interaction with students. Then Andrew told me that he was about to do a guest lecture and explained me what he had in mind.

Essentially, he picked some YouTube videos that are related to HIV prevention in some manner and then used them to break the ice with his class and have discussions about the content and the cultural context of the message. If this is how digital natives interpret “lecture”, then they are anything but dead.

[These are explicit – you’ve been warned. Legality is also a question of course — but they’re hosted on YouTube. I’ll let the Google lawyers work that out.]


The Philadelphia Marathon is tomorrow.  I can hardly believe it.  I thought I’d do a little brain-dump to capture my pre-race thoughts.

Last winter, psychiatrist I  read a story in Wired about Dean Karanzes, an ultramarathon runner and since the weather was so nice, I started running around the neighborhood with my dog.  I also started running on the indoor track over lunch and on the weekends as a way to manage stress.  I added some miles without much of a problem and started running with Jeff (a co-worker). 

When we got up to about 10 miles, we started talking about doing a marathon.  Two of my cousins have done them before (Doug and Dave), plus we know several other people who have done them (Ann, Stevie, Nancy, among others). 

I got a Nike+ system to chart my progress, which was a motivator for a while, but now I don’t need it to get me out the door and on the road.  I also bought two books that I recommend.  The first is the Non-Runner’s Marathon Trainer, which is a nice roadmap to take someone who can run a 5K up to marathon level in about 4 months.  The other is Dean Karnazes’s book, Ultramarathon Man, which I found to be inspirational.

The longest run that I have done so far is about 20 miles, which should be sufficient to be able to push through to 26.  I’m having some IT-band problems, but I have a strap that is supposed to help and I’ve been stretching a lot more lately.  I love running in cooler weather and it’s supposed to be in the 30’s and 40’s tomorrow morning, so that’s cool enough (maybe too cold, but we’ll see).  I’ll be running in some relatively new shoes and a complete set of Undergear that Andrew bought me as an early Birthday present.

So yesterday, I drove down to Philly to check into the hotel and pick up my and Jeff’s packets.  I stayed for about an hour at the Health and Fitness Expo that they had and it was pretty nice.  I bought a few things: Power Gel blocks (like a sports drink in gummy form) and the IT-band strap for my knee.  I also picked up some information about a couple of marathons in May, in case I decide to do another one in the Spring.  I drove back last night so I could be around for Andrew’s Mom’s birthday party and bring him back to Philly with me.  I have a good idea of how to get back to the hotel tonight and where to go to start the marathon, so the trip down was worth the time.

So today is a lot of drinking and stretching, the birthday party, drive to Philly, crash at the hotel, and hopefully get a little sleep before running tomorrow.

Powered by ScribeFire.

On Saturday (April 14th), infertility we had our 2007 Teaching and Learning with Technology Symposium.


The idea of the event is to create a time and space for faculty to share the ways they use technology to improve teaching, learning, and research. I have no experience planning events like this, so when I was asked to take over the Symposium, I said “sure, why not”. I left my old job last year, mainly because I was looking for a real challenge and something that would give me the opportunity to stay on top of new developments in and applications of educational technologies.

So I put the Symposium together with a good team of planning and operations people. The result was very positive (based on feedback I’ve gotten from participants), but there were some things that could be done better. I’m not being a perfectionist either. I just want to put on an event with transparent logistical issues (mics, internet access, positioning, seating, etc…) and a few pleasant surprises here and there (mostly related to the look and feel of the event). I don’t want perfection, but I want people to have a Disney-like experience. An Apple-design experience. Where things fit together, the technology works, and people relax and smile and let their guard down and talk openly.

Adults need to play more. Maybe that’s what I’m after — creating an experience that is like playground chaos. Tag, you’re it. I don’t know your name, but I have an extra soda if you want it. Is that your dog? Okay, that’s the answer.

New Plan: I’ll top this year’s Symposium by bringing kittens and puppies to the next one.

Another thing about this analogy: no one cares who built the playground or who cleans up. That’s what I mean by transparency. I don’t need praise for doing my job. The challenge of the event is a reward in itself. I just want to sit back and watch everyone have a good time.

Revised plan: next year, puppies, kittens, and an invisibility cloak. Nothing is as transparent as invisibility.

After the event is over, what I really want is good, detailed feedback. Every challenge like this is a complex riddle and I am better able to solve the riddle if I have good information about the previous solution. Code optimization. That’s what I’m after.

Re-revised plan: puppies, kittens, invisibility cloak, and a slip-n-slide. [Yeah, I know, slip-n-slide has nothing to do with code optimization, but they’re a lot of fun.]

I’m beginning to sound like a crazy person, but it has felt good to get this off my chest.
The Nike + iPod graph from my first run.
I went to the doctor this week and my cholesterol is not too great. I don’t get how that happens. I exercise and I’m a vegetarian. Andrew, gerontologist who eats the same stuff as I do, recipe has a cholesterol level around 150 and I’m above 200. Bad genes? You bet. Both of my parents are on cholesterol-lowering drugs. Maybe Lipitor is on the horizon, but I’m still going to try to manage it with diet and exercise. My doctor suggested flax oil and niacin-rich foods or a supplement, so I’ve started taking both niacin and flax daily to see if it helps. Andrew started taking them too. With my luck, my cholesterol will keep getting worse while Andrew will be able to bend space and time.
Today was just my second day with the Nike+ system and after I was done running 4 miles, remedy I got the normal “workout complete” message, more about but then Lance Armstrong’s voice came on and said something along the lines of “Congratulations, that was your longest run ever”. I don’t idolize Lance or anything, but I thought it was a nice touch. It’s good to recognize a new personal record because, frankly, I’m only competing with myself. A few limitations of the system:

  • I can’t enter historical data about myself. My actual longest-ever run was about 16 miles, back in the mid 1990’s. I might get there again some day, now that I can afford good shoes and can work out the time needed to do a 3-hour workout. But I can’t enter that personal record into the system or anything like my old high school times. Maybe that’s a good thing.
  • Warm-up and cool-down periods will mess up my data. I typically walk several laps to cool down — or I may just walk the whole time if I’ve injured something. The calories will still count, but the average-time calculations will mess up my overall averages while running. This doesn’t seem like a big deal, but one of my goals is to have several workouts under a 8:20 average mile, which would be killed with a cool-down time included. I may have to let this one go. I’m more interested in distance and calories anyway.
  • I can’t enter alternate forms of exercise. If I swim 20 laps one day, I can’t enter that workout data into my charts. Same goes for working out on exercise machines. A treadmill may work (I’m not sure and would be interested if anyone has tried it), but probably not a stair climber or elliptical machine.

When all is said and done though, it’s a great system and I’m very happy with it. Now, I need to go pick a power song.
Okay, cialis 40mg I’m no expert, but I took one recipe and did a lot of substitutions to replace things like egg yolks and butter with more heart-friendly ingredients. The sun butter and walnuts still have fat, but supposedly a more healthy kind. if you make a batch, let me know what you think:

3 cups Oatmeal
1.5 cups whole wheat flour
2 cups applesauce
4 egg whites
1.5 cups brown sugar
2 tsp vanilla
2 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp nutmeg
1 tsp baking soda
1.5 cups golden raisins
2 tbsp sun butter (like peanut butter, except made from sunflower seeds – use peanut butter if you like)
1 cup chopped walnuts

Don’t measure precisely — I never do. Mix it all up and use a tablespoon to scoop the mix onto a cookie sheet (I use parchment paper to prevent sticking). Cook for about 12 minutes at 350F. You know they’re done when they’re a little toasted on the surface and they should hold their shape after begin cooled for about 5 minutes.

edit: I reduced the cups of oatmeal from 4 to 3. The last batch came out a little too oaty.
A little over a week ago (January 27th), population health I joined Twitter along with a bunch of people from work. Basically, online it lets you answer the question “What are you doing now?” throughout the day. People post about breakfast, migraine the weather, server problems, and such, but I find that the most interesting posts are about thoughts or recent discoveries. In that sense, it’s more like a 10-second blog or nanoblog than simply a stream of what a bunch of people are doing. It’s a stream of human activity in its more broad sense.

Anyway, it’s coming up on two weeks and I have found that Twitter helps to organize my thoughts, I have a better sense of the people at the office, my boss and the CIO know what I’m doing with my time, and I have a hundred opportunities a day to talk to one of my colleagues based on something they find interesting and post as a tweet. I have a feeling that the same people who blog will be the ones that Twitter the most, which is a shame really, because I have no idea what the other people in my office are thinking on a daily basis. Overall, good stuff.
When I’ve heard about problems with using online text resources (PDFs and electronic textbooks), infection the focus seems to be on issues like contrast, resolution, and eyestrain. I just spent a couple of hours looking up some articles online and I think the problem has nothing to do with these technical issues (at least for me) since I spend a LOT of time reading and writing online. For me, the issue is how these resources feed into my activity.

When I write and need to use a lot of reference material. I don’t read the sources and then write all at once. I’m constantly moving back and forth between what I’m writing and what I’m reading, especially if I want to quote something correctly. If these are all on a computer screen, I don’t want to flip back and forth between applications — that breaks the flow of my writing activity.

This has been on my mind lately (and now parked in the blog) because I’ve spent a lot of time this weekend looking up reference articles on my laptop. I feel more constrained than usual because in my office, I have a dual-screen setup (laptop and external monitor). There, I can have all of my reading materials visible on one screen while I have the writing application open on another. I don’t feel the need to print out everything. On the other hand, this weekend, with only one screen, I feel cramped. At one point, I was actually using two computers: one to display reference material and the other to write.

In any case, I’ll have to look into this further. Ultimately, I prefer electronic reference materials, to save paper and ink, but also because they are searchable and easy to file away for future reference.
Since I need to exercise a lot to keep the weight off (and hopefully have an improvement in my BP and cholesterol), mycoplasmosis I’ve been running about four times per week. Last weekend, viagra I ran 8 miles and I’m thinking of running 10 this weekend. It’s only February and I could see myself easily getting up to a half-marathon in another month or so. I talked with Stevie yesterday and the idea of running a marathon came up. I think I can do it. The longest distance I’ve run before was 16 miles and I stopped because I was having some joint pain. At the time, illness I didn’t know how much of an impact that my shoes could have on getting injured. I thought that I just wasn’t built for long distances. Boredom was another problem. When you’re running for more than two hours alone and on the same route, it can be rather dull.

In any case, I have a good pair of shoes now and the Nike+iPod system has been a great motivator. I’m going to build up slowly, using a program from “Galloway’s Book of Running”. Basically, short runs during the week and a long run on the weekends. I’m supposed to slow down for the long runs (1.5 to 2 minutes more per mile), but I like my normal pace. Still, I want the distance without injury, so I’ll give it a try.
The thing that I like the most about more recent developments in video games is the incorporation of more authentic motions and input devices. Guitar Hero is essentially the same game as Frequency and Amplitude (also for PS2), tadalafil except that you play with the guitar controller instead of a standard PS2 controller. With Donkey Konga, you play the drums. In Dance Dance Revolution, you move your feet on a dance pad. These games are more fun because of their authentic interactions. Or to put this another way, I hate when I can’t figure out how to play a game because I can’t remember the right combinations of arbitrary button combinations.

Today I got my Wii. The controller itself is the same device for many of the games, but what you do with the controller is authentic. I understood how to bowl and swing a bat right away. I forgot that I was using a controller at all and felt like part of the game. It was pretty amazing how quickly I was immersed in the experience and that made it all the more fun. I have a PS3 as well and the graphics are amazing, but I just don’t get the same feeling of interacting directly with the game. The controller is still a barrier between me and the gaming experience. Anyway, I need new games on both systems and I think each will have its strengths — but right now, the Wii appears to have the upper hand.
For some other people who expressed interest in replicating my Nike+iPod setup, treat here are some useful links to the three purchases that you’d need to make. The total comes in around $140 with this combination.

  1. Refurbished 1GB iPod Nano (I got a 2GB one instead), this $79: Apple store, ed then select “Refurbished iPod” on the left for the listing. Any 1st generation or 2nd generation Nano will do.
  2. Nike+iPod Kit for about $29. The sensor fits into a Nike+ shoe, but if you don’t have Nike+ shoes, buy the sensor pouch/armband combination in #3
  3. Marware Armband and Sensor Pouch (they come together) for about $22. This armband is MUCH BETTER than the Nike one since it lets you see the screen on the Nano and comes with the sensor pouch so you don’t have to use the Nike+ shoes.

A few days ago, sildenafil I ran a Twitter Insta-Poll and asked people to complete the phrase “Twitter makes me _____“. One of the comments has been echoing in my head. Brad said “Twitter makes me feel like a cyborg”. Aren’t we cyborgs already?

I don’t mean in the Jean-Luc Picard way, buy where we’re all whirring gears and hive minded (although this is debatable). Rather, two of the defining characteristics of humanity is our ability to communicate complex thoughts and use tools to enhance our physical and mental abilities. Our cars, iPods, cell-phones, computers, and other devices are integrated seamlessly into our movement and consciousness. In fact, the more seamlessly, the better, hence Apple’s success. When I go for a run, most of the runners are wired — connected to the sounds of people they will never meet. We have gone so far as to begin internalizing several of these tools through implants that replace limbs and lost senses, regulate heartbeats, deliver medicine, and control symptoms. We have dental implants, metal plates, plastic hips, transplanted kidneys (and eyes, livers, skin, lungs, etc…), vaccinations, thousands of drugs and vitamins, laser-shaped eyes, tattoos, and piercings. The list goes on an on. We modify our culture. Culture modifies our bodies.

How are we not cyborgs already? Wikipedia and the blogosphere are the hive mind. Cell phones and Twitter are our opt-in telepathy. And those who opt-out are being pushed to the fringe. In Pennsylvania, the Amish are supposed to reject the use of technology, but even they are using cell phones these days.

The point that I’m trying to make is that humans are cyborgs by nature. We will continue to develop tools and integrate them into our culture, thereby advancing the human/machine species at a rate that out-paces any biological advancements that occur through the evolutionary process.
In 1994, anabolics I ran my first and only half-marathon race. Amazingly, oncology the results are available online. So when I was 24, generic I ran the 13.something miles at about a 8:18/mile pace. I haven’t run that long since then — maybe 16-18 miles in 1995, but I slacked off after that. In any case, it’s encouraging that my 14 mile run today was at a 8:41 pace. Not quite as fast as my half-marathon time, but I also didn’t have the race adrenaline going. If I run it this year, it would be nice to match or beat my old time.

While I was looking for this information, I ran across the race results for my cousin Dave (who is about 20 years older than me). If I remember correctly, he has run a marathon before and he’s still doing a bunch of runs every year. That’s encouraging for my long-term prospects. I haven’t talked to him in a while (he’s in Michigan)…I should give him a call.
Last week, seek I was talking to Andrew about lectures and I made the comment “lectures are dead”, sildenafil thinking about some of the bad ones from my own educational experience — where someone is quacking at the front of the classroom with no interaction with students. Then Andrew told me that he was about to do a guest lecture and explained me what he had in mind.

Essentially, he picked some YouTube videos that are related to HIV prevention in some manner and then used them to break the ice with his class and have discussions about the content and the cultural context of the message. If this is how digital natives interpret “lecture”, then they are anything but dead.

[These are explicit – you’ve been warned. Legality is also a question of course — but they’re hosted on YouTube. I’ll let the Google lawyers work that out.]


The Philadelphia Marathon is tomorrow.  I can hardly believe it.  I thought I’d do a little brain-dump to capture my pre-race thoughts.

Last winter, psychiatrist I  read a story in Wired about Dean Karanzes, an ultramarathon runner and since the weather was so nice, I started running around the neighborhood with my dog.  I also started running on the indoor track over lunch and on the weekends as a way to manage stress.  I added some miles without much of a problem and started running with Jeff (a co-worker). 

When we got up to about 10 miles, we started talking about doing a marathon.  Two of my cousins have done them before (Doug and Dave), plus we know several other people who have done them (Ann, Stevie, Nancy, among others). 

I got a Nike+ system to chart my progress, which was a motivator for a while, but now I don’t need it to get me out the door and on the road.  I also bought two books that I recommend.  The first is the Non-Runner’s Marathon Trainer, which is a nice roadmap to take someone who can run a 5K up to marathon level in about 4 months.  The other is Dean Karnazes’s book, Ultramarathon Man, which I found to be inspirational.

The longest run that I have done so far is about 20 miles, which should be sufficient to be able to push through to 26.  I’m having some IT-band problems, but I have a strap that is supposed to help and I’ve been stretching a lot more lately.  I love running in cooler weather and it’s supposed to be in the 30’s and 40’s tomorrow morning, so that’s cool enough (maybe too cold, but we’ll see).  I’ll be running in some relatively new shoes and a complete set of Undergear that Andrew bought me as an early Birthday present.

So yesterday, I drove down to Philly to check into the hotel and pick up my and Jeff’s packets.  I stayed for about an hour at the Health and Fitness Expo that they had and it was pretty nice.  I bought a few things: Power Gel blocks (like a sports drink in gummy form) and the IT-band strap for my knee.  I also picked up some information about a couple of marathons in May, in case I decide to do another one in the Spring.  I drove back last night so I could be around for Andrew’s Mom’s birthday party and bring him back to Philly with me.  I have a good idea of how to get back to the hotel tonight and where to go to start the marathon, so the trip down was worth the time.

So today is a lot of drinking and stretching, the birthday party, drive to Philly, crash at the hotel, and hopefully get a little sleep before running tomorrow.

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On Saturday (April 14th), infertility we had our 2007 Teaching and Learning with Technology Symposium.


The idea of the event is to create a time and space for faculty to share the ways they use technology to improve teaching, learning, and research. I have no experience planning events like this, so when I was asked to take over the Symposium, I said “sure, why not”. I left my old job last year, mainly because I was looking for a real challenge and something that would give me the opportunity to stay on top of new developments in and applications of educational technologies.

So I put the Symposium together with a good team of planning and operations people. The result was very positive (based on feedback I’ve gotten from participants), but there were some things that could be done better. I’m not being a perfectionist either. I just want to put on an event with transparent logistical issues (mics, internet access, positioning, seating, etc…) and a few pleasant surprises here and there (mostly related to the look and feel of the event). I don’t want perfection, but I want people to have a Disney-like experience. An Apple-design experience. Where things fit together, the technology works, and people relax and smile and let their guard down and talk openly.

Adults need to play more. Maybe that’s what I’m after — creating an experience that is like playground chaos. Tag, you’re it. I don’t know your name, but I have an extra soda if you want it. Is that your dog? Okay, that’s the answer.

New Plan: I’ll top this year’s Symposium by bringing kittens and puppies to the next one.

Another thing about this analogy: no one cares who built the playground or who cleans up. That’s what I mean by transparency. I don’t need praise for doing my job. The challenge of the event is a reward in itself. I just want to sit back and watch everyone have a good time.

Revised plan: next year, puppies, kittens, and an invisibility cloak. Nothing is as transparent as invisibility.

After the event is over, what I really want is good, detailed feedback. Every challenge like this is a complex riddle and I am better able to solve the riddle if I have good information about the previous solution. Code optimization. That’s what I’m after.

Re-revised plan: puppies, kittens, invisibility cloak, and a slip-n-slide. [Yeah, I know, slip-n-slide has nothing to do with code optimization, but they’re a lot of fun.]

I’m beginning to sound like a crazy person, but it has felt good to get this off my chest.
Although we’ve talked about it for a few years now, generic Andrew and I finally decided to join a community-supported agriculture program this year. Essentially, therapist we bought a “share” of what a particular local farm produces for the next six months. In this case, check it’s Village Acres Farm, which is an organic family-run farm. Each week, we go pick up a box and some bags of seasonal fruits and vegetables. You can also pay more for an “egg-share”, “flower-share”, meat, baked goods, cheese, and other products.

Today was our first weekly pick up and we didn’t quite know what to expect. We got a dozen eggs (apparently the hens are happy) and a box of veggies: bok choy, spinach, asparagus, lettuce, radishes, rosemary, and celeriac. Personally, I’ve never heard of celeriac before, but it’s a root vegetable in the celery family that is like a potato in consistency.

The share also included a newsletter about the farm and upcoming events as well as recipes for dishes that could be made using many of the veggies provided. We decided to try the quiche recipe (with some modifications) and it came out very well. We shredded some celeriac and used it as the crust for the quiche.

[LOL…Andrew just came out of the kitchen with two hands full of lettuce, which he is eating without dressing or utensils.]

This will be a bit of an adventure. It should help us eat healthier, broaden my cooking horizons, and support a local organic farm. Downsides? Not many. We had to pay for the share in advance and we could get more than we can eat when the farm is producing in full swing, but I don’t mind giving away my extras when we have them.
The Nike + iPod graph from my first run.
I went to the doctor this week and my cholesterol is not too great. I don’t get how that happens. I exercise and I’m a vegetarian. Andrew, gerontologist who eats the same stuff as I do, recipe has a cholesterol level around 150 and I’m above 200. Bad genes? You bet. Both of my parents are on cholesterol-lowering drugs. Maybe Lipitor is on the horizon, but I’m still going to try to manage it with diet and exercise. My doctor suggested flax oil and niacin-rich foods or a supplement, so I’ve started taking both niacin and flax daily to see if it helps. Andrew started taking them too. With my luck, my cholesterol will keep getting worse while Andrew will be able to bend space and time.
Today was just my second day with the Nike+ system and after I was done running 4 miles, remedy I got the normal “workout complete” message, more about but then Lance Armstrong’s voice came on and said something along the lines of “Congratulations, that was your longest run ever”. I don’t idolize Lance or anything, but I thought it was a nice touch. It’s good to recognize a new personal record because, frankly, I’m only competing with myself. A few limitations of the system:

  • I can’t enter historical data about myself. My actual longest-ever run was about 16 miles, back in the mid 1990’s. I might get there again some day, now that I can afford good shoes and can work out the time needed to do a 3-hour workout. But I can’t enter that personal record into the system or anything like my old high school times. Maybe that’s a good thing.
  • Warm-up and cool-down periods will mess up my data. I typically walk several laps to cool down — or I may just walk the whole time if I’ve injured something. The calories will still count, but the average-time calculations will mess up my overall averages while running. This doesn’t seem like a big deal, but one of my goals is to have several workouts under a 8:20 average mile, which would be killed with a cool-down time included. I may have to let this one go. I’m more interested in distance and calories anyway.
  • I can’t enter alternate forms of exercise. If I swim 20 laps one day, I can’t enter that workout data into my charts. Same goes for working out on exercise machines. A treadmill may work (I’m not sure and would be interested if anyone has tried it), but probably not a stair climber or elliptical machine.

When all is said and done though, it’s a great system and I’m very happy with it. Now, I need to go pick a power song.
Okay, cialis 40mg I’m no expert, but I took one recipe and did a lot of substitutions to replace things like egg yolks and butter with more heart-friendly ingredients. The sun butter and walnuts still have fat, but supposedly a more healthy kind. if you make a batch, let me know what you think:

3 cups Oatmeal
1.5 cups whole wheat flour
2 cups applesauce
4 egg whites
1.5 cups brown sugar
2 tsp vanilla
2 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp nutmeg
1 tsp baking soda
1.5 cups golden raisins
2 tbsp sun butter (like peanut butter, except made from sunflower seeds – use peanut butter if you like)
1 cup chopped walnuts

Don’t measure precisely — I never do. Mix it all up and use a tablespoon to scoop the mix onto a cookie sheet (I use parchment paper to prevent sticking). Cook for about 12 minutes at 350F. You know they’re done when they’re a little toasted on the surface and they should hold their shape after begin cooled for about 5 minutes.

edit: I reduced the cups of oatmeal from 4 to 3. The last batch came out a little too oaty.
A little over a week ago (January 27th), population health I joined Twitter along with a bunch of people from work. Basically, online it lets you answer the question “What are you doing now?” throughout the day. People post about breakfast, migraine the weather, server problems, and such, but I find that the most interesting posts are about thoughts or recent discoveries. In that sense, it’s more like a 10-second blog or nanoblog than simply a stream of what a bunch of people are doing. It’s a stream of human activity in its more broad sense.

Anyway, it’s coming up on two weeks and I have found that Twitter helps to organize my thoughts, I have a better sense of the people at the office, my boss and the CIO know what I’m doing with my time, and I have a hundred opportunities a day to talk to one of my colleagues based on something they find interesting and post as a tweet. I have a feeling that the same people who blog will be the ones that Twitter the most, which is a shame really, because I have no idea what the other people in my office are thinking on a daily basis. Overall, good stuff.
When I’ve heard about problems with using online text resources (PDFs and electronic textbooks), infection the focus seems to be on issues like contrast, resolution, and eyestrain. I just spent a couple of hours looking up some articles online and I think the problem has nothing to do with these technical issues (at least for me) since I spend a LOT of time reading and writing online. For me, the issue is how these resources feed into my activity.

When I write and need to use a lot of reference material. I don’t read the sources and then write all at once. I’m constantly moving back and forth between what I’m writing and what I’m reading, especially if I want to quote something correctly. If these are all on a computer screen, I don’t want to flip back and forth between applications — that breaks the flow of my writing activity.

This has been on my mind lately (and now parked in the blog) because I’ve spent a lot of time this weekend looking up reference articles on my laptop. I feel more constrained than usual because in my office, I have a dual-screen setup (laptop and external monitor). There, I can have all of my reading materials visible on one screen while I have the writing application open on another. I don’t feel the need to print out everything. On the other hand, this weekend, with only one screen, I feel cramped. At one point, I was actually using two computers: one to display reference material and the other to write.

In any case, I’ll have to look into this further. Ultimately, I prefer electronic reference materials, to save paper and ink, but also because they are searchable and easy to file away for future reference.
Since I need to exercise a lot to keep the weight off (and hopefully have an improvement in my BP and cholesterol), mycoplasmosis I’ve been running about four times per week. Last weekend, viagra I ran 8 miles and I’m thinking of running 10 this weekend. It’s only February and I could see myself easily getting up to a half-marathon in another month or so. I talked with Stevie yesterday and the idea of running a marathon came up. I think I can do it. The longest distance I’ve run before was 16 miles and I stopped because I was having some joint pain. At the time, illness I didn’t know how much of an impact that my shoes could have on getting injured. I thought that I just wasn’t built for long distances. Boredom was another problem. When you’re running for more than two hours alone and on the same route, it can be rather dull.

In any case, I have a good pair of shoes now and the Nike+iPod system has been a great motivator. I’m going to build up slowly, using a program from “Galloway’s Book of Running”. Basically, short runs during the week and a long run on the weekends. I’m supposed to slow down for the long runs (1.5 to 2 minutes more per mile), but I like my normal pace. Still, I want the distance without injury, so I’ll give it a try.
The thing that I like the most about more recent developments in video games is the incorporation of more authentic motions and input devices. Guitar Hero is essentially the same game as Frequency and Amplitude (also for PS2), tadalafil except that you play with the guitar controller instead of a standard PS2 controller. With Donkey Konga, you play the drums. In Dance Dance Revolution, you move your feet on a dance pad. These games are more fun because of their authentic interactions. Or to put this another way, I hate when I can’t figure out how to play a game because I can’t remember the right combinations of arbitrary button combinations.

Today I got my Wii. The controller itself is the same device for many of the games, but what you do with the controller is authentic. I understood how to bowl and swing a bat right away. I forgot that I was using a controller at all and felt like part of the game. It was pretty amazing how quickly I was immersed in the experience and that made it all the more fun. I have a PS3 as well and the graphics are amazing, but I just don’t get the same feeling of interacting directly with the game. The controller is still a barrier between me and the gaming experience. Anyway, I need new games on both systems and I think each will have its strengths — but right now, the Wii appears to have the upper hand.
For some other people who expressed interest in replicating my Nike+iPod setup, treat here are some useful links to the three purchases that you’d need to make. The total comes in around $140 with this combination.

  1. Refurbished 1GB iPod Nano (I got a 2GB one instead), this $79: Apple store, ed then select “Refurbished iPod” on the left for the listing. Any 1st generation or 2nd generation Nano will do.
  2. Nike+iPod Kit for about $29. The sensor fits into a Nike+ shoe, but if you don’t have Nike+ shoes, buy the sensor pouch/armband combination in #3
  3. Marware Armband and Sensor Pouch (they come together) for about $22. This armband is MUCH BETTER than the Nike one since it lets you see the screen on the Nano and comes with the sensor pouch so you don’t have to use the Nike+ shoes.

A few days ago, sildenafil I ran a Twitter Insta-Poll and asked people to complete the phrase “Twitter makes me _____“. One of the comments has been echoing in my head. Brad said “Twitter makes me feel like a cyborg”. Aren’t we cyborgs already?

I don’t mean in the Jean-Luc Picard way, buy where we’re all whirring gears and hive minded (although this is debatable). Rather, two of the defining characteristics of humanity is our ability to communicate complex thoughts and use tools to enhance our physical and mental abilities. Our cars, iPods, cell-phones, computers, and other devices are integrated seamlessly into our movement and consciousness. In fact, the more seamlessly, the better, hence Apple’s success. When I go for a run, most of the runners are wired — connected to the sounds of people they will never meet. We have gone so far as to begin internalizing several of these tools through implants that replace limbs and lost senses, regulate heartbeats, deliver medicine, and control symptoms. We have dental implants, metal plates, plastic hips, transplanted kidneys (and eyes, livers, skin, lungs, etc…), vaccinations, thousands of drugs and vitamins, laser-shaped eyes, tattoos, and piercings. The list goes on an on. We modify our culture. Culture modifies our bodies.

How are we not cyborgs already? Wikipedia and the blogosphere are the hive mind. Cell phones and Twitter are our opt-in telepathy. And those who opt-out are being pushed to the fringe. In Pennsylvania, the Amish are supposed to reject the use of technology, but even they are using cell phones these days.

The point that I’m trying to make is that humans are cyborgs by nature. We will continue to develop tools and integrate them into our culture, thereby advancing the human/machine species at a rate that out-paces any biological advancements that occur through the evolutionary process.
In 1994, anabolics I ran my first and only half-marathon race. Amazingly, oncology the results are available online. So when I was 24, generic I ran the 13.something miles at about a 8:18/mile pace. I haven’t run that long since then — maybe 16-18 miles in 1995, but I slacked off after that. In any case, it’s encouraging that my 14 mile run today was at a 8:41 pace. Not quite as fast as my half-marathon time, but I also didn’t have the race adrenaline going. If I run it this year, it would be nice to match or beat my old time.

While I was looking for this information, I ran across the race results for my cousin Dave (who is about 20 years older than me). If I remember correctly, he has run a marathon before and he’s still doing a bunch of runs every year. That’s encouraging for my long-term prospects. I haven’t talked to him in a while (he’s in Michigan)…I should give him a call.
Last week, seek I was talking to Andrew about lectures and I made the comment “lectures are dead”, sildenafil thinking about some of the bad ones from my own educational experience — where someone is quacking at the front of the classroom with no interaction with students. Then Andrew told me that he was about to do a guest lecture and explained me what he had in mind.

Essentially, he picked some YouTube videos that are related to HIV prevention in some manner and then used them to break the ice with his class and have discussions about the content and the cultural context of the message. If this is how digital natives interpret “lecture”, then they are anything but dead.

[These are explicit – you’ve been warned. Legality is also a question of course — but they’re hosted on YouTube. I’ll let the Google lawyers work that out.]


The Philadelphia Marathon is tomorrow.  I can hardly believe it.  I thought I’d do a little brain-dump to capture my pre-race thoughts.

Last winter, psychiatrist I  read a story in Wired about Dean Karanzes, an ultramarathon runner and since the weather was so nice, I started running around the neighborhood with my dog.  I also started running on the indoor track over lunch and on the weekends as a way to manage stress.  I added some miles without much of a problem and started running with Jeff (a co-worker). 

When we got up to about 10 miles, we started talking about doing a marathon.  Two of my cousins have done them before (Doug and Dave), plus we know several other people who have done them (Ann, Stevie, Nancy, among others). 

I got a Nike+ system to chart my progress, which was a motivator for a while, but now I don’t need it to get me out the door and on the road.  I also bought two books that I recommend.  The first is the Non-Runner’s Marathon Trainer, which is a nice roadmap to take someone who can run a 5K up to marathon level in about 4 months.  The other is Dean Karnazes’s book, Ultramarathon Man, which I found to be inspirational.

The longest run that I have done so far is about 20 miles, which should be sufficient to be able to push through to 26.  I’m having some IT-band problems, but I have a strap that is supposed to help and I’ve been stretching a lot more lately.  I love running in cooler weather and it’s supposed to be in the 30’s and 40’s tomorrow morning, so that’s cool enough (maybe too cold, but we’ll see).  I’ll be running in some relatively new shoes and a complete set of Undergear that Andrew bought me as an early Birthday present.

So yesterday, I drove down to Philly to check into the hotel and pick up my and Jeff’s packets.  I stayed for about an hour at the Health and Fitness Expo that they had and it was pretty nice.  I bought a few things: Power Gel blocks (like a sports drink in gummy form) and the IT-band strap for my knee.  I also picked up some information about a couple of marathons in May, in case I decide to do another one in the Spring.  I drove back last night so I could be around for Andrew’s Mom’s birthday party and bring him back to Philly with me.  I have a good idea of how to get back to the hotel tonight and where to go to start the marathon, so the trip down was worth the time.

So today is a lot of drinking and stretching, the birthday party, drive to Philly, crash at the hotel, and hopefully get a little sleep before running tomorrow.

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On Saturday (April 14th), infertility we had our 2007 Teaching and Learning with Technology Symposium.


The idea of the event is to create a time and space for faculty to share the ways they use technology to improve teaching, learning, and research. I have no experience planning events like this, so when I was asked to take over the Symposium, I said “sure, why not”. I left my old job last year, mainly because I was looking for a real challenge and something that would give me the opportunity to stay on top of new developments in and applications of educational technologies.

So I put the Symposium together with a good team of planning and operations people. The result was very positive (based on feedback I’ve gotten from participants), but there were some things that could be done better. I’m not being a perfectionist either. I just want to put on an event with transparent logistical issues (mics, internet access, positioning, seating, etc…) and a few pleasant surprises here and there (mostly related to the look and feel of the event). I don’t want perfection, but I want people to have a Disney-like experience. An Apple-design experience. Where things fit together, the technology works, and people relax and smile and let their guard down and talk openly.

Adults need to play more. Maybe that’s what I’m after — creating an experience that is like playground chaos. Tag, you’re it. I don’t know your name, but I have an extra soda if you want it. Is that your dog? Okay, that’s the answer.

New Plan: I’ll top this year’s Symposium by bringing kittens and puppies to the next one.

Another thing about this analogy: no one cares who built the playground or who cleans up. That’s what I mean by transparency. I don’t need praise for doing my job. The challenge of the event is a reward in itself. I just want to sit back and watch everyone have a good time.

Revised plan: next year, puppies, kittens, and an invisibility cloak. Nothing is as transparent as invisibility.

After the event is over, what I really want is good, detailed feedback. Every challenge like this is a complex riddle and I am better able to solve the riddle if I have good information about the previous solution. Code optimization. That’s what I’m after.

Re-revised plan: puppies, kittens, invisibility cloak, and a slip-n-slide. [Yeah, I know, slip-n-slide has nothing to do with code optimization, but they’re a lot of fun.]

I’m beginning to sound like a crazy person, but it has felt good to get this off my chest.
Although we’ve talked about it for a few years now, generic Andrew and I finally decided to join a community-supported agriculture program this year. Essentially, therapist we bought a “share” of what a particular local farm produces for the next six months. In this case, check it’s Village Acres Farm, which is an organic family-run farm. Each week, we go pick up a box and some bags of seasonal fruits and vegetables. You can also pay more for an “egg-share”, “flower-share”, meat, baked goods, cheese, and other products.

Today was our first weekly pick up and we didn’t quite know what to expect. We got a dozen eggs (apparently the hens are happy) and a box of veggies: bok choy, spinach, asparagus, lettuce, radishes, rosemary, and celeriac. Personally, I’ve never heard of celeriac before, but it’s a root vegetable in the celery family that is like a potato in consistency.

The share also included a newsletter about the farm and upcoming events as well as recipes for dishes that could be made using many of the veggies provided. We decided to try the quiche recipe (with some modifications) and it came out very well. We shredded some celeriac and used it as the crust for the quiche.

[LOL…Andrew just came out of the kitchen with two hands full of lettuce, which he is eating without dressing or utensils.]

This will be a bit of an adventure. It should help us eat healthier, broaden my cooking horizons, and support a local organic farm. Downsides? Not many. We had to pay for the share in advance and we could get more than we can eat when the farm is producing in full swing, but I don’t mind giving away my extras when we have them.
The aliens are here, treatment they’re playing music, and lead by Bjork!

I’m a big fan of what I’ve seen in multi-touch interfaces. The keyboard/mouse have been great for the last 20 years, but they have also shaped (and limited) how we think about computing. Then something like this comes along and gets me excited about input and interaction again.

There are more demos of this on YouTube.

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The Nike + iPod graph from my first run.
I went to the doctor this week and my cholesterol is not too great. I don’t get how that happens. I exercise and I’m a vegetarian. Andrew, gerontologist who eats the same stuff as I do, recipe has a cholesterol level around 150 and I’m above 200. Bad genes? You bet. Both of my parents are on cholesterol-lowering drugs. Maybe Lipitor is on the horizon, but I’m still going to try to manage it with diet and exercise. My doctor suggested flax oil and niacin-rich foods or a supplement, so I’ve started taking both niacin and flax daily to see if it helps. Andrew started taking them too. With my luck, my cholesterol will keep getting worse while Andrew will be able to bend space and time.
Today was just my second day with the Nike+ system and after I was done running 4 miles, remedy I got the normal “workout complete” message, more about but then Lance Armstrong’s voice came on and said something along the lines of “Congratulations, that was your longest run ever”. I don’t idolize Lance or anything, but I thought it was a nice touch. It’s good to recognize a new personal record because, frankly, I’m only competing with myself. A few limitations of the system:

  • I can’t enter historical data about myself. My actual longest-ever run was about 16 miles, back in the mid 1990’s. I might get there again some day, now that I can afford good shoes and can work out the time needed to do a 3-hour workout. But I can’t enter that personal record into the system or anything like my old high school times. Maybe that’s a good thing.
  • Warm-up and cool-down periods will mess up my data. I typically walk several laps to cool down — or I may just walk the whole time if I’ve injured something. The calories will still count, but the average-time calculations will mess up my overall averages while running. This doesn’t seem like a big deal, but one of my goals is to have several workouts under a 8:20 average mile, which would be killed with a cool-down time included. I may have to let this one go. I’m more interested in distance and calories anyway.
  • I can’t enter alternate forms of exercise. If I swim 20 laps one day, I can’t enter that workout data into my charts. Same goes for working out on exercise machines. A treadmill may work (I’m not sure and would be interested if anyone has tried it), but probably not a stair climber or elliptical machine.

When all is said and done though, it’s a great system and I’m very happy with it. Now, I need to go pick a power song.
Okay, cialis 40mg I’m no expert, but I took one recipe and did a lot of substitutions to replace things like egg yolks and butter with more heart-friendly ingredients. The sun butter and walnuts still have fat, but supposedly a more healthy kind. if you make a batch, let me know what you think:

3 cups Oatmeal
1.5 cups whole wheat flour
2 cups applesauce
4 egg whites
1.5 cups brown sugar
2 tsp vanilla
2 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp nutmeg
1 tsp baking soda
1.5 cups golden raisins
2 tbsp sun butter (like peanut butter, except made from sunflower seeds – use peanut butter if you like)
1 cup chopped walnuts

Don’t measure precisely — I never do. Mix it all up and use a tablespoon to scoop the mix onto a cookie sheet (I use parchment paper to prevent sticking). Cook for about 12 minutes at 350F. You know they’re done when they’re a little toasted on the surface and they should hold their shape after begin cooled for about 5 minutes.

edit: I reduced the cups of oatmeal from 4 to 3. The last batch came out a little too oaty.
A little over a week ago (January 27th), population health I joined Twitter along with a bunch of people from work. Basically, online it lets you answer the question “What are you doing now?” throughout the day. People post about breakfast, migraine the weather, server problems, and such, but I find that the most interesting posts are about thoughts or recent discoveries. In that sense, it’s more like a 10-second blog or nanoblog than simply a stream of what a bunch of people are doing. It’s a stream of human activity in its more broad sense.

Anyway, it’s coming up on two weeks and I have found that Twitter helps to organize my thoughts, I have a better sense of the people at the office, my boss and the CIO know what I’m doing with my time, and I have a hundred opportunities a day to talk to one of my colleagues based on something they find interesting and post as a tweet. I have a feeling that the same people who blog will be the ones that Twitter the most, which is a shame really, because I have no idea what the other people in my office are thinking on a daily basis. Overall, good stuff.
When I’ve heard about problems with using online text resources (PDFs and electronic textbooks), infection the focus seems to be on issues like contrast, resolution, and eyestrain. I just spent a couple of hours looking up some articles online and I think the problem has nothing to do with these technical issues (at least for me) since I spend a LOT of time reading and writing online. For me, the issue is how these resources feed into my activity.

When I write and need to use a lot of reference material. I don’t read the sources and then write all at once. I’m constantly moving back and forth between what I’m writing and what I’m reading, especially if I want to quote something correctly. If these are all on a computer screen, I don’t want to flip back and forth between applications — that breaks the flow of my writing activity.

This has been on my mind lately (and now parked in the blog) because I’ve spent a lot of time this weekend looking up reference articles on my laptop. I feel more constrained than usual because in my office, I have a dual-screen setup (laptop and external monitor). There, I can have all of my reading materials visible on one screen while I have the writing application open on another. I don’t feel the need to print out everything. On the other hand, this weekend, with only one screen, I feel cramped. At one point, I was actually using two computers: one to display reference material and the other to write.

In any case, I’ll have to look into this further. Ultimately, I prefer electronic reference materials, to save paper and ink, but also because they are searchable and easy to file away for future reference.
Since I need to exercise a lot to keep the weight off (and hopefully have an improvement in my BP and cholesterol), mycoplasmosis I’ve been running about four times per week. Last weekend, viagra I ran 8 miles and I’m thinking of running 10 this weekend. It’s only February and I could see myself easily getting up to a half-marathon in another month or so. I talked with Stevie yesterday and the idea of running a marathon came up. I think I can do it. The longest distance I’ve run before was 16 miles and I stopped because I was having some joint pain. At the time, illness I didn’t know how much of an impact that my shoes could have on getting injured. I thought that I just wasn’t built for long distances. Boredom was another problem. When you’re running for more than two hours alone and on the same route, it can be rather dull.

In any case, I have a good pair of shoes now and the Nike+iPod system has been a great motivator. I’m going to build up slowly, using a program from “Galloway’s Book of Running”. Basically, short runs during the week and a long run on the weekends. I’m supposed to slow down for the long runs (1.5 to 2 minutes more per mile), but I like my normal pace. Still, I want the distance without injury, so I’ll give it a try.
The thing that I like the most about more recent developments in video games is the incorporation of more authentic motions and input devices. Guitar Hero is essentially the same game as Frequency and Amplitude (also for PS2), tadalafil except that you play with the guitar controller instead of a standard PS2 controller. With Donkey Konga, you play the drums. In Dance Dance Revolution, you move your feet on a dance pad. These games are more fun because of their authentic interactions. Or to put this another way, I hate when I can’t figure out how to play a game because I can’t remember the right combinations of arbitrary button combinations.

Today I got my Wii. The controller itself is the same device for many of the games, but what you do with the controller is authentic. I understood how to bowl and swing a bat right away. I forgot that I was using a controller at all and felt like part of the game. It was pretty amazing how quickly I was immersed in the experience and that made it all the more fun. I have a PS3 as well and the graphics are amazing, but I just don’t get the same feeling of interacting directly with the game. The controller is still a barrier between me and the gaming experience. Anyway, I need new games on both systems and I think each will have its strengths — but right now, the Wii appears to have the upper hand.
For some other people who expressed interest in replicating my Nike+iPod setup, treat here are some useful links to the three purchases that you’d need to make. The total comes in around $140 with this combination.

  1. Refurbished 1GB iPod Nano (I got a 2GB one instead), this $79: Apple store, ed then select “Refurbished iPod” on the left for the listing. Any 1st generation or 2nd generation Nano will do.
  2. Nike+iPod Kit for about $29. The sensor fits into a Nike+ shoe, but if you don’t have Nike+ shoes, buy the sensor pouch/armband combination in #3
  3. Marware Armband and Sensor Pouch (they come together) for about $22. This armband is MUCH BETTER than the Nike one since it lets you see the screen on the Nano and comes with the sensor pouch so you don’t have to use the Nike+ shoes.

A few days ago, sildenafil I ran a Twitter Insta-Poll and asked people to complete the phrase “Twitter makes me _____“. One of the comments has been echoing in my head. Brad said “Twitter makes me feel like a cyborg”. Aren’t we cyborgs already?

I don’t mean in the Jean-Luc Picard way, buy where we’re all whirring gears and hive minded (although this is debatable). Rather, two of the defining characteristics of humanity is our ability to communicate complex thoughts and use tools to enhance our physical and mental abilities. Our cars, iPods, cell-phones, computers, and other devices are integrated seamlessly into our movement and consciousness. In fact, the more seamlessly, the better, hence Apple’s success. When I go for a run, most of the runners are wired — connected to the sounds of people they will never meet. We have gone so far as to begin internalizing several of these tools through implants that replace limbs and lost senses, regulate heartbeats, deliver medicine, and control symptoms. We have dental implants, metal plates, plastic hips, transplanted kidneys (and eyes, livers, skin, lungs, etc…), vaccinations, thousands of drugs and vitamins, laser-shaped eyes, tattoos, and piercings. The list goes on an on. We modify our culture. Culture modifies our bodies.

How are we not cyborgs already? Wikipedia and the blogosphere are the hive mind. Cell phones and Twitter are our opt-in telepathy. And those who opt-out are being pushed to the fringe. In Pennsylvania, the Amish are supposed to reject the use of technology, but even they are using cell phones these days.

The point that I’m trying to make is that humans are cyborgs by nature. We will continue to develop tools and integrate them into our culture, thereby advancing the human/machine species at a rate that out-paces any biological advancements that occur through the evolutionary process.
In 1994, anabolics I ran my first and only half-marathon race. Amazingly, oncology the results are available online. So when I was 24, generic I ran the 13.something miles at about a 8:18/mile pace. I haven’t run that long since then — maybe 16-18 miles in 1995, but I slacked off after that. In any case, it’s encouraging that my 14 mile run today was at a 8:41 pace. Not quite as fast as my half-marathon time, but I also didn’t have the race adrenaline going. If I run it this year, it would be nice to match or beat my old time.

While I was looking for this information, I ran across the race results for my cousin Dave (who is about 20 years older than me). If I remember correctly, he has run a marathon before and he’s still doing a bunch of runs every year. That’s encouraging for my long-term prospects. I haven’t talked to him in a while (he’s in Michigan)…I should give him a call.
Last week, seek I was talking to Andrew about lectures and I made the comment “lectures are dead”, sildenafil thinking about some of the bad ones from my own educational experience — where someone is quacking at the front of the classroom with no interaction with students. Then Andrew told me that he was about to do a guest lecture and explained me what he had in mind.

Essentially, he picked some YouTube videos that are related to HIV prevention in some manner and then used them to break the ice with his class and have discussions about the content and the cultural context of the message. If this is how digital natives interpret “lecture”, then they are anything but dead.

[These are explicit – you’ve been warned. Legality is also a question of course — but they’re hosted on YouTube. I’ll let the Google lawyers work that out.]


The Philadelphia Marathon is tomorrow.  I can hardly believe it.  I thought I’d do a little brain-dump to capture my pre-race thoughts.

Last winter, psychiatrist I  read a story in Wired about Dean Karanzes, an ultramarathon runner and since the weather was so nice, I started running around the neighborhood with my dog.  I also started running on the indoor track over lunch and on the weekends as a way to manage stress.  I added some miles without much of a problem and started running with Jeff (a co-worker). 

When we got up to about 10 miles, we started talking about doing a marathon.  Two of my cousins have done them before (Doug and Dave), plus we know several other people who have done them (Ann, Stevie, Nancy, among others). 

I got a Nike+ system to chart my progress, which was a motivator for a while, but now I don’t need it to get me out the door and on the road.  I also bought two books that I recommend.  The first is the Non-Runner’s Marathon Trainer, which is a nice roadmap to take someone who can run a 5K up to marathon level in about 4 months.  The other is Dean Karnazes’s book, Ultramarathon Man, which I found to be inspirational.

The longest run that I have done so far is about 20 miles, which should be sufficient to be able to push through to 26.  I’m having some IT-band problems, but I have a strap that is supposed to help and I’ve been stretching a lot more lately.  I love running in cooler weather and it’s supposed to be in the 30’s and 40’s tomorrow morning, so that’s cool enough (maybe too cold, but we’ll see).  I’ll be running in some relatively new shoes and a complete set of Undergear that Andrew bought me as an early Birthday present.

So yesterday, I drove down to Philly to check into the hotel and pick up my and Jeff’s packets.  I stayed for about an hour at the Health and Fitness Expo that they had and it was pretty nice.  I bought a few things: Power Gel blocks (like a sports drink in gummy form) and the IT-band strap for my knee.  I also picked up some information about a couple of marathons in May, in case I decide to do another one in the Spring.  I drove back last night so I could be around for Andrew’s Mom’s birthday party and bring him back to Philly with me.  I have a good idea of how to get back to the hotel tonight and where to go to start the marathon, so the trip down was worth the time.

So today is a lot of drinking and stretching, the birthday party, drive to Philly, crash at the hotel, and hopefully get a little sleep before running tomorrow.

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On Saturday (April 14th), infertility we had our 2007 Teaching and Learning with Technology Symposium.


The idea of the event is to create a time and space for faculty to share the ways they use technology to improve teaching, learning, and research. I have no experience planning events like this, so when I was asked to take over the Symposium, I said “sure, why not”. I left my old job last year, mainly because I was looking for a real challenge and something that would give me the opportunity to stay on top of new developments in and applications of educational technologies.

So I put the Symposium together with a good team of planning and operations people. The result was very positive (based on feedback I’ve gotten from participants), but there were some things that could be done better. I’m not being a perfectionist either. I just want to put on an event with transparent logistical issues (mics, internet access, positioning, seating, etc…) and a few pleasant surprises here and there (mostly related to the look and feel of the event). I don’t want perfection, but I want people to have a Disney-like experience. An Apple-design experience. Where things fit together, the technology works, and people relax and smile and let their guard down and talk openly.

Adults need to play more. Maybe that’s what I’m after — creating an experience that is like playground chaos. Tag, you’re it. I don’t know your name, but I have an extra soda if you want it. Is that your dog? Okay, that’s the answer.

New Plan: I’ll top this year’s Symposium by bringing kittens and puppies to the next one.

Another thing about this analogy: no one cares who built the playground or who cleans up. That’s what I mean by transparency. I don’t need praise for doing my job. The challenge of the event is a reward in itself. I just want to sit back and watch everyone have a good time.

Revised plan: next year, puppies, kittens, and an invisibility cloak. Nothing is as transparent as invisibility.

After the event is over, what I really want is good, detailed feedback. Every challenge like this is a complex riddle and I am better able to solve the riddle if I have good information about the previous solution. Code optimization. That’s what I’m after.

Re-revised plan: puppies, kittens, invisibility cloak, and a slip-n-slide. [Yeah, I know, slip-n-slide has nothing to do with code optimization, but they’re a lot of fun.]

I’m beginning to sound like a crazy person, but it has felt good to get this off my chest.
Although we’ve talked about it for a few years now, generic Andrew and I finally decided to join a community-supported agriculture program this year. Essentially, therapist we bought a “share” of what a particular local farm produces for the next six months. In this case, check it’s Village Acres Farm, which is an organic family-run farm. Each week, we go pick up a box and some bags of seasonal fruits and vegetables. You can also pay more for an “egg-share”, “flower-share”, meat, baked goods, cheese, and other products.

Today was our first weekly pick up and we didn’t quite know what to expect. We got a dozen eggs (apparently the hens are happy) and a box of veggies: bok choy, spinach, asparagus, lettuce, radishes, rosemary, and celeriac. Personally, I’ve never heard of celeriac before, but it’s a root vegetable in the celery family that is like a potato in consistency.

The share also included a newsletter about the farm and upcoming events as well as recipes for dishes that could be made using many of the veggies provided. We decided to try the quiche recipe (with some modifications) and it came out very well. We shredded some celeriac and used it as the crust for the quiche.

[LOL…Andrew just came out of the kitchen with two hands full of lettuce, which he is eating without dressing or utensils.]

This will be a bit of an adventure. It should help us eat healthier, broaden my cooking horizons, and support a local organic farm. Downsides? Not many. We had to pay for the share in advance and we could get more than we can eat when the farm is producing in full swing, but I don’t mind giving away my extras when we have them.
The aliens are here, treatment they’re playing music, and lead by Bjork!

I’m a big fan of what I’ve seen in multi-touch interfaces. The keyboard/mouse have been great for the last 20 years, but they have also shaped (and limited) how we think about computing. Then something like this comes along and gets me excited about input and interaction again.

There are more demos of this on YouTube.

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I’m having problems with something in my hip area…not sure what exactly, pill but I’m guessing that I pulled a muscle or strained a tendon in my right hip area. Anyway, viagra 100mg I’m going to give cross-training a try so I can keep in shape and rest the injury. I’m still planning to run a couple of times a week, but I’m going to go to the gym as well and do work on stair climbers and the orbital. I’m hoping to build up some leg strength and get in some low-impact cardio.

My problem is that Nike+ doesn’t track cross-training workouts. So while I’m still being “good” and working out, I don’t get the same kind of tracking and reward from the Nike+ training system. Plus I have a 250 mile challenge with an old friend in Seattle, which I could lose if I don’t do track-able activities. It’s not the end of the world and I’ll still track what I can and I would still recommend the system to anyone and everyone, but these little annoyances add up.
The Nike + iPod graph from my first run.
I went to the doctor this week and my cholesterol is not too great. I don’t get how that happens. I exercise and I’m a vegetarian. Andrew, gerontologist who eats the same stuff as I do, recipe has a cholesterol level around 150 and I’m above 200. Bad genes? You bet. Both of my parents are on cholesterol-lowering drugs. Maybe Lipitor is on the horizon, but I’m still going to try to manage it with diet and exercise. My doctor suggested flax oil and niacin-rich foods or a supplement, so I’ve started taking both niacin and flax daily to see if it helps. Andrew started taking them too. With my luck, my cholesterol will keep getting worse while Andrew will be able to bend space and time.
Today was just my second day with the Nike+ system and after I was done running 4 miles, remedy I got the normal “workout complete” message, more about but then Lance Armstrong’s voice came on and said something along the lines of “Congratulations, that was your longest run ever”. I don’t idolize Lance or anything, but I thought it was a nice touch. It’s good to recognize a new personal record because, frankly, I’m only competing with myself. A few limitations of the system:

  • I can’t enter historical data about myself. My actual longest-ever run was about 16 miles, back in the mid 1990’s. I might get there again some day, now that I can afford good shoes and can work out the time needed to do a 3-hour workout. But I can’t enter that personal record into the system or anything like my old high school times. Maybe that’s a good thing.
  • Warm-up and cool-down periods will mess up my data. I typically walk several laps to cool down — or I may just walk the whole time if I’ve injured something. The calories will still count, but the average-time calculations will mess up my overall averages while running. This doesn’t seem like a big deal, but one of my goals is to have several workouts under a 8:20 average mile, which would be killed with a cool-down time included. I may have to let this one go. I’m more interested in distance and calories anyway.
  • I can’t enter alternate forms of exercise. If I swim 20 laps one day, I can’t enter that workout data into my charts. Same goes for working out on exercise machines. A treadmill may work (I’m not sure and would be interested if anyone has tried it), but probably not a stair climber or elliptical machine.

When all is said and done though, it’s a great system and I’m very happy with it. Now, I need to go pick a power song.
Okay, cialis 40mg I’m no expert, but I took one recipe and did a lot of substitutions to replace things like egg yolks and butter with more heart-friendly ingredients. The sun butter and walnuts still have fat, but supposedly a more healthy kind. if you make a batch, let me know what you think:

3 cups Oatmeal
1.5 cups whole wheat flour
2 cups applesauce
4 egg whites
1.5 cups brown sugar
2 tsp vanilla
2 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp nutmeg
1 tsp baking soda
1.5 cups golden raisins
2 tbsp sun butter (like peanut butter, except made from sunflower seeds – use peanut butter if you like)
1 cup chopped walnuts

Don’t measure precisely — I never do. Mix it all up and use a tablespoon to scoop the mix onto a cookie sheet (I use parchment paper to prevent sticking). Cook for about 12 minutes at 350F. You know they’re done when they’re a little toasted on the surface and they should hold their shape after begin cooled for about 5 minutes.

edit: I reduced the cups of oatmeal from 4 to 3. The last batch came out a little too oaty.
A little over a week ago (January 27th), population health I joined Twitter along with a bunch of people from work. Basically, online it lets you answer the question “What are you doing now?” throughout the day. People post about breakfast, migraine the weather, server problems, and such, but I find that the most interesting posts are about thoughts or recent discoveries. In that sense, it’s more like a 10-second blog or nanoblog than simply a stream of what a bunch of people are doing. It’s a stream of human activity in its more broad sense.

Anyway, it’s coming up on two weeks and I have found that Twitter helps to organize my thoughts, I have a better sense of the people at the office, my boss and the CIO know what I’m doing with my time, and I have a hundred opportunities a day to talk to one of my colleagues based on something they find interesting and post as a tweet. I have a feeling that the same people who blog will be the ones that Twitter the most, which is a shame really, because I have no idea what the other people in my office are thinking on a daily basis. Overall, good stuff.
When I’ve heard about problems with using online text resources (PDFs and electronic textbooks), infection the focus seems to be on issues like contrast, resolution, and eyestrain. I just spent a couple of hours looking up some articles online and I think the problem has nothing to do with these technical issues (at least for me) since I spend a LOT of time reading and writing online. For me, the issue is how these resources feed into my activity.

When I write and need to use a lot of reference material. I don’t read the sources and then write all at once. I’m constantly moving back and forth between what I’m writing and what I’m reading, especially if I want to quote something correctly. If these are all on a computer screen, I don’t want to flip back and forth between applications — that breaks the flow of my writing activity.

This has been on my mind lately (and now parked in the blog) because I’ve spent a lot of time this weekend looking up reference articles on my laptop. I feel more constrained than usual because in my office, I have a dual-screen setup (laptop and external monitor). There, I can have all of my reading materials visible on one screen while I have the writing application open on another. I don’t feel the need to print out everything. On the other hand, this weekend, with only one screen, I feel cramped. At one point, I was actually using two computers: one to display reference material and the other to write.

In any case, I’ll have to look into this further. Ultimately, I prefer electronic reference materials, to save paper and ink, but also because they are searchable and easy to file away for future reference.
Since I need to exercise a lot to keep the weight off (and hopefully have an improvement in my BP and cholesterol), mycoplasmosis I’ve been running about four times per week. Last weekend, viagra I ran 8 miles and I’m thinking of running 10 this weekend. It’s only February and I could see myself easily getting up to a half-marathon in another month or so. I talked with Stevie yesterday and the idea of running a marathon came up. I think I can do it. The longest distance I’ve run before was 16 miles and I stopped because I was having some joint pain. At the time, illness I didn’t know how much of an impact that my shoes could have on getting injured. I thought that I just wasn’t built for long distances. Boredom was another problem. When you’re running for more than two hours alone and on the same route, it can be rather dull.

In any case, I have a good pair of shoes now and the Nike+iPod system has been a great motivator. I’m going to build up slowly, using a program from “Galloway’s Book of Running”. Basically, short runs during the week and a long run on the weekends. I’m supposed to slow down for the long runs (1.5 to 2 minutes more per mile), but I like my normal pace. Still, I want the distance without injury, so I’ll give it a try.
The thing that I like the most about more recent developments in video games is the incorporation of more authentic motions and input devices. Guitar Hero is essentially the same game as Frequency and Amplitude (also for PS2), tadalafil except that you play with the guitar controller instead of a standard PS2 controller. With Donkey Konga, you play the drums. In Dance Dance Revolution, you move your feet on a dance pad. These games are more fun because of their authentic interactions. Or to put this another way, I hate when I can’t figure out how to play a game because I can’t remember the right combinations of arbitrary button combinations.

Today I got my Wii. The controller itself is the same device for many of the games, but what you do with the controller is authentic. I understood how to bowl and swing a bat right away. I forgot that I was using a controller at all and felt like part of the game. It was pretty amazing how quickly I was immersed in the experience and that made it all the more fun. I have a PS3 as well and the graphics are amazing, but I just don’t get the same feeling of interacting directly with the game. The controller is still a barrier between me and the gaming experience. Anyway, I need new games on both systems and I think each will have its strengths — but right now, the Wii appears to have the upper hand.
For some other people who expressed interest in replicating my Nike+iPod setup, treat here are some useful links to the three purchases that you’d need to make. The total comes in around $140 with this combination.

  1. Refurbished 1GB iPod Nano (I got a 2GB one instead), this $79: Apple store, ed then select “Refurbished iPod” on the left for the listing. Any 1st generation or 2nd generation Nano will do.
  2. Nike+iPod Kit for about $29. The sensor fits into a Nike+ shoe, but if you don’t have Nike+ shoes, buy the sensor pouch/armband combination in #3
  3. Marware Armband and Sensor Pouch (they come together) for about $22. This armband is MUCH BETTER than the Nike one since it lets you see the screen on the Nano and comes with the sensor pouch so you don’t have to use the Nike+ shoes.

A few days ago, sildenafil I ran a Twitter Insta-Poll and asked people to complete the phrase “Twitter makes me _____“. One of the comments has been echoing in my head. Brad said “Twitter makes me feel like a cyborg”. Aren’t we cyborgs already?

I don’t mean in the Jean-Luc Picard way, buy where we’re all whirring gears and hive minded (although this is debatable). Rather, two of the defining characteristics of humanity is our ability to communicate complex thoughts and use tools to enhance our physical and mental abilities. Our cars, iPods, cell-phones, computers, and other devices are integrated seamlessly into our movement and consciousness. In fact, the more seamlessly, the better, hence Apple’s success. When I go for a run, most of the runners are wired — connected to the sounds of people they will never meet. We have gone so far as to begin internalizing several of these tools through implants that replace limbs and lost senses, regulate heartbeats, deliver medicine, and control symptoms. We have dental implants, metal plates, plastic hips, transplanted kidneys (and eyes, livers, skin, lungs, etc…), vaccinations, thousands of drugs and vitamins, laser-shaped eyes, tattoos, and piercings. The list goes on an on. We modify our culture. Culture modifies our bodies.

How are we not cyborgs already? Wikipedia and the blogosphere are the hive mind. Cell phones and Twitter are our opt-in telepathy. And those who opt-out are being pushed to the fringe. In Pennsylvania, the Amish are supposed to reject the use of technology, but even they are using cell phones these days.

The point that I’m trying to make is that humans are cyborgs by nature. We will continue to develop tools and integrate them into our culture, thereby advancing the human/machine species at a rate that out-paces any biological advancements that occur through the evolutionary process.
In 1994, anabolics I ran my first and only half-marathon race. Amazingly, oncology the results are available online. So when I was 24, generic I ran the 13.something miles at about a 8:18/mile pace. I haven’t run that long since then — maybe 16-18 miles in 1995, but I slacked off after that. In any case, it’s encouraging that my 14 mile run today was at a 8:41 pace. Not quite as fast as my half-marathon time, but I also didn’t have the race adrenaline going. If I run it this year, it would be nice to match or beat my old time.

While I was looking for this information, I ran across the race results for my cousin Dave (who is about 20 years older than me). If I remember correctly, he has run a marathon before and he’s still doing a bunch of runs every year. That’s encouraging for my long-term prospects. I haven’t talked to him in a while (he’s in Michigan)…I should give him a call.
Last week, seek I was talking to Andrew about lectures and I made the comment “lectures are dead”, sildenafil thinking about some of the bad ones from my own educational experience — where someone is quacking at the front of the classroom with no interaction with students. Then Andrew told me that he was about to do a guest lecture and explained me what he had in mind.

Essentially, he picked some YouTube videos that are related to HIV prevention in some manner and then used them to break the ice with his class and have discussions about the content and the cultural context of the message. If this is how digital natives interpret “lecture”, then they are anything but dead.

[These are explicit – you’ve been warned. Legality is also a question of course — but they’re hosted on YouTube. I’ll let the Google lawyers work that out.]


The Philadelphia Marathon is tomorrow.  I can hardly believe it.  I thought I’d do a little brain-dump to capture my pre-race thoughts.

Last winter, psychiatrist I  read a story in Wired about Dean Karanzes, an ultramarathon runner and since the weather was so nice, I started running around the neighborhood with my dog.  I also started running on the indoor track over lunch and on the weekends as a way to manage stress.  I added some miles without much of a problem and started running with Jeff (a co-worker). 

When we got up to about 10 miles, we started talking about doing a marathon.  Two of my cousins have done them before (Doug and Dave), plus we know several other people who have done them (Ann, Stevie, Nancy, among others). 

I got a Nike+ system to chart my progress, which was a motivator for a while, but now I don’t need it to get me out the door and on the road.  I also bought two books that I recommend.  The first is the Non-Runner’s Marathon Trainer, which is a nice roadmap to take someone who can run a 5K up to marathon level in about 4 months.  The other is Dean Karnazes’s book, Ultramarathon Man, which I found to be inspirational.

The longest run that I have done so far is about 20 miles, which should be sufficient to be able to push through to 26.  I’m having some IT-band problems, but I have a strap that is supposed to help and I’ve been stretching a lot more lately.  I love running in cooler weather and it’s supposed to be in the 30’s and 40’s tomorrow morning, so that’s cool enough (maybe too cold, but we’ll see).  I’ll be running in some relatively new shoes and a complete set of Undergear that Andrew bought me as an early Birthday present.

So yesterday, I drove down to Philly to check into the hotel and pick up my and Jeff’s packets.  I stayed for about an hour at the Health and Fitness Expo that they had and it was pretty nice.  I bought a few things: Power Gel blocks (like a sports drink in gummy form) and the IT-band strap for my knee.  I also picked up some information about a couple of marathons in May, in case I decide to do another one in the Spring.  I drove back last night so I could be around for Andrew’s Mom’s birthday party and bring him back to Philly with me.  I have a good idea of how to get back to the hotel tonight and where to go to start the marathon, so the trip down was worth the time.

So today is a lot of drinking and stretching, the birthday party, drive to Philly, crash at the hotel, and hopefully get a little sleep before running tomorrow.

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On Saturday (April 14th), infertility we had our 2007 Teaching and Learning with Technology Symposium.


The idea of the event is to create a time and space for faculty to share the ways they use technology to improve teaching, learning, and research. I have no experience planning events like this, so when I was asked to take over the Symposium, I said “sure, why not”. I left my old job last year, mainly because I was looking for a real challenge and something that would give me the opportunity to stay on top of new developments in and applications of educational technologies.

So I put the Symposium together with a good team of planning and operations people. The result was very positive (based on feedback I’ve gotten from participants), but there were some things that could be done better. I’m not being a perfectionist either. I just want to put on an event with transparent logistical issues (mics, internet access, positioning, seating, etc…) and a few pleasant surprises here and there (mostly related to the look and feel of the event). I don’t want perfection, but I want people to have a Disney-like experience. An Apple-design experience. Where things fit together, the technology works, and people relax and smile and let their guard down and talk openly.

Adults need to play more. Maybe that’s what I’m after — creating an experience that is like playground chaos. Tag, you’re it. I don’t know your name, but I have an extra soda if you want it. Is that your dog? Okay, that’s the answer.

New Plan: I’ll top this year’s Symposium by bringing kittens and puppies to the next one.

Another thing about this analogy: no one cares who built the playground or who cleans up. That’s what I mean by transparency. I don’t need praise for doing my job. The challenge of the event is a reward in itself. I just want to sit back and watch everyone have a good time.

Revised plan: next year, puppies, kittens, and an invisibility cloak. Nothing is as transparent as invisibility.

After the event is over, what I really want is good, detailed feedback. Every challenge like this is a complex riddle and I am better able to solve the riddle if I have good information about the previous solution. Code optimization. That’s what I’m after.

Re-revised plan: puppies, kittens, invisibility cloak, and a slip-n-slide. [Yeah, I know, slip-n-slide has nothing to do with code optimization, but they’re a lot of fun.]

I’m beginning to sound like a crazy person, but it has felt good to get this off my chest.
Although we’ve talked about it for a few years now, generic Andrew and I finally decided to join a community-supported agriculture program this year. Essentially, therapist we bought a “share” of what a particular local farm produces for the next six months. In this case, check it’s Village Acres Farm, which is an organic family-run farm. Each week, we go pick up a box and some bags of seasonal fruits and vegetables. You can also pay more for an “egg-share”, “flower-share”, meat, baked goods, cheese, and other products.

Today was our first weekly pick up and we didn’t quite know what to expect. We got a dozen eggs (apparently the hens are happy) and a box of veggies: bok choy, spinach, asparagus, lettuce, radishes, rosemary, and celeriac. Personally, I’ve never heard of celeriac before, but it’s a root vegetable in the celery family that is like a potato in consistency.

The share also included a newsletter about the farm and upcoming events as well as recipes for dishes that could be made using many of the veggies provided. We decided to try the quiche recipe (with some modifications) and it came out very well. We shredded some celeriac and used it as the crust for the quiche.

[LOL…Andrew just came out of the kitchen with two hands full of lettuce, which he is eating without dressing or utensils.]

This will be a bit of an adventure. It should help us eat healthier, broaden my cooking horizons, and support a local organic farm. Downsides? Not many. We had to pay for the share in advance and we could get more than we can eat when the farm is producing in full swing, but I don’t mind giving away my extras when we have them.
The aliens are here, treatment they’re playing music, and lead by Bjork!

I’m a big fan of what I’ve seen in multi-touch interfaces. The keyboard/mouse have been great for the last 20 years, but they have also shaped (and limited) how we think about computing. Then something like this comes along and gets me excited about input and interaction again.

There are more demos of this on YouTube.

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I’m having problems with something in my hip area…not sure what exactly, pill but I’m guessing that I pulled a muscle or strained a tendon in my right hip area. Anyway, viagra 100mg I’m going to give cross-training a try so I can keep in shape and rest the injury. I’m still planning to run a couple of times a week, but I’m going to go to the gym as well and do work on stair climbers and the orbital. I’m hoping to build up some leg strength and get in some low-impact cardio.

My problem is that Nike+ doesn’t track cross-training workouts. So while I’m still being “good” and working out, I don’t get the same kind of tracking and reward from the Nike+ training system. Plus I have a 250 mile challenge with an old friend in Seattle, which I could lose if I don’t do track-able activities. It’s not the end of the world and I’ll still track what I can and I would still recommend the system to anyone and everyone, but these little annoyances add up.
My Windows machine at home is fairly old and my parents are still on a Pentium III, phlebologist so I’ve been thinking of getting a new Windows computer.  Something cheap would do.  I’d get a speed increase, give my current computer to my parents, and I’d have a good opportunity to learn Vista.  But do I really want a Windows machine when I’m in love with Apple these days? 

I could get a Mac of some kind, but I have a Mac laptop for work.  It’s running out of space and I don’t want to load personal software on it, so a personal Mac would be nice.  I could eventually load Vista on it as well. But where I could get a fairly cheap Windows machine, I would feel guilty getting a cheap Mac, especially if I want to dual-boot it at some point.

Money is an issue because it’s June and June 2007 = iPhone month.  I’m still not 100% sure that I want an iPhone, but considering the use I’ve gotten out of other PDAs in the past, it’s an Apple product, and the fact that I really need a new phone, it seems likely that I’ll enjoy it.  I’m already using Cingular as my carrier.  I was thinking the other day that I could blog from anywhere if I had an iPhone.  I love the other innovative things that they’ve included, such as the voicemail interface and the proximity sensor.  So would I love it, or am I being seduced by another interesting gadget?  I think I need to see one before I can decide on any of this.

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iPhone – Could it be that one thing?

Yeah, drugs that would be nice. I’m hardly an undergrad with the need to find cheap booze and wet t-shirts, but every now and then, you need to take a break … in spring … hence spring break. I’ve been to Amsterdam three times. Each one has been a trip to remember.

September 2001: my first trip for work reasons. I went to talk to the Open University of the Netherlands about their distance education programs. The weather was great. It would rain in short bursts throughout the day, but inevitably followed by a rainbow. There’s something nice about seeing rainbows all day. It feels like paradise. Of course, I returned to the U.S. on September 11 and they ended up routing our plane to Nova Scotia. We sat on the runway in that plane from about 11 AM to midnight while we were all on the plane trying to get cell phone service and find out what was going on. Planes were falling from the sky as far as we knew. Anyway, we ended up in a sports arena in Halifax overnight with the Red Cross providing some help.

November 2001: Yep, just a month and a half after the first trip, I went again, with Andrew this time. It was a very interesting Thanksgiving, which they don’t celebrate in the Netherlands of course. We enjoyed all of the streets stringed with lights and Christmas decorations. We also discovered all of the H&M stores and Holland Casino. Really, this trip was about discovering the hidden parts of the city. It’s harder than you would think because all of the building fronts are historical — without neon signs advertising that this mansion-looking thing is actually a mini-mall. We found a nice chocolate shop with herb-flavored chocolates: tea, basil, etc… Very good stuff.

May 2004: The flowers in The Netherlands peak in April, but it was still nice to go around the city and see them everywhere. We spent some time in the Bloomenmarket (Flower Market) and found a bunch of cafes where people of all ages hang out with the constant companionship of techno music. Did I mention paradise before?

Its more expensive to go there now because the dollar hasn’t done very well against the euro for the past couple of years. It used to be than one dollar was about 1.2 euros, but the exchange rates have switched since then. So this year, we’re going to try to pool our money together with some friends and get a place to share. If that doesn’t work out, we’re still going to take the time off, but it might be something simple. Maybe we should save Amsterdam for the summer.
Yeah, drugs that would be nice. I’m hardly an undergrad with the need to find cheap booze and wet t-shirts, but every now and then, you need to take a break … in spring … hence spring break. I’ve been to Amsterdam three times. Each one has been a trip to remember.

September 2001: my first trip for work reasons. I went to talk to the Open University of the Netherlands about their distance education programs. The weather was great. It would rain in short bursts throughout the day, but inevitably followed by a rainbow. There’s something nice about seeing rainbows all day. It feels like paradise. Of course, I returned to the U.S. on September 11 and they ended up routing our plane to Nova Scotia. We sat on the runway in that plane from about 11 AM to midnight while we were all on the plane trying to get cell phone service and find out what was going on. Planes were falling from the sky as far as we knew. Anyway, we ended up in a sports arena in Halifax overnight with the Red Cross providing some help.

November 2001: Yep, just a month and a half after the first trip, I went again, with Andrew this time. It was a very interesting Thanksgiving, which they don’t celebrate in the Netherlands of course. We enjoyed all of the streets stringed with lights and Christmas decorations. We also discovered all of the H&M stores and Holland Casino. Really, this trip was about discovering the hidden parts of the city. It’s harder than you would think because all of the building fronts are historical — without neon signs advertising that this mansion-looking thing is actually a mini-mall. We found a nice chocolate shop with herb-flavored chocolates: tea, basil, etc… Very good stuff.

May 2004: The flowers in The Netherlands peak in April, but it was still nice to go around the city and see them everywhere. We spent some time in the Bloomenmarket (Flower Market) and found a bunch of cafes where people of all ages hang out with the constant companionship of techno music. Did I mention paradise before?

Its more expensive to go there now because the dollar hasn’t done very well against the euro for the past couple of years. It used to be than one dollar was about 1.2 euros, but the exchange rates have switched since then. So this year, we’re going to try to pool our money together with some friends and get a place to share. If that doesn’t work out, we’re still going to take the time off, but it might be something simple. Maybe we should save Amsterdam for the summer.
This week, information pills Jeff gives an update on his Weight Watchers program, price we talk about a couple of exercise drink powders (Hornet Juice and President’s Choice), dealing with multiple podcasts and Nike+, and what our training plans look like between now and the 2008 Philadelphia Marathon. By the way, it was “The Running Shoe” that has the “I am an athlete” saying. Ashland Dave deserves a little love as well though.

Related Links:

Yeah, drugs that would be nice. I’m hardly an undergrad with the need to find cheap booze and wet t-shirts, but every now and then, you need to take a break … in spring … hence spring break. I’ve been to Amsterdam three times. Each one has been a trip to remember.

September 2001: my first trip for work reasons. I went to talk to the Open University of the Netherlands about their distance education programs. The weather was great. It would rain in short bursts throughout the day, but inevitably followed by a rainbow. There’s something nice about seeing rainbows all day. It feels like paradise. Of course, I returned to the U.S. on September 11 and they ended up routing our plane to Nova Scotia. We sat on the runway in that plane from about 11 AM to midnight while we were all on the plane trying to get cell phone service and find out what was going on. Planes were falling from the sky as far as we knew. Anyway, we ended up in a sports arena in Halifax overnight with the Red Cross providing some help.

November 2001: Yep, just a month and a half after the first trip, I went again, with Andrew this time. It was a very interesting Thanksgiving, which they don’t celebrate in the Netherlands of course. We enjoyed all of the streets stringed with lights and Christmas decorations. We also discovered all of the H&M stores and Holland Casino. Really, this trip was about discovering the hidden parts of the city. It’s harder than you would think because all of the building fronts are historical — without neon signs advertising that this mansion-looking thing is actually a mini-mall. We found a nice chocolate shop with herb-flavored chocolates: tea, basil, etc… Very good stuff.

May 2004: The flowers in The Netherlands peak in April, but it was still nice to go around the city and see them everywhere. We spent some time in the Bloomenmarket (Flower Market) and found a bunch of cafes where people of all ages hang out with the constant companionship of techno music. Did I mention paradise before?

Its more expensive to go there now because the dollar hasn’t done very well against the euro for the past couple of years. It used to be than one dollar was about 1.2 euros, but the exchange rates have switched since then. So this year, we’re going to try to pool our money together with some friends and get a place to share. If that doesn’t work out, we’re still going to take the time off, but it might be something simple. Maybe we should save Amsterdam for the summer.
This week, information pills Jeff gives an update on his Weight Watchers program, price we talk about a couple of exercise drink powders (Hornet Juice and President’s Choice), dealing with multiple podcasts and Nike+, and what our training plans look like between now and the 2008 Philadelphia Marathon. By the way, it was “The Running Shoe” that has the “I am an athlete” saying. Ashland Dave deserves a little love as well though.

Related Links:

You know, approved I really need to write more so I don’t seem like a viral marketing strategy for The Chumby, noun which I still lust after — but on to other things.

I’m a fan of harmless creative mischief. I’m not talking about those hidden camera shows, where someone is humiliated for the sake of ratings. Even if the target has a laugh afterward, it’s still pretty mean and the commerical aspect makes it mean for profit. Nope, not a good combination.

I’m a fan of those moments where people get together and do something just for the sake of the act itself. For example, I have a couple of friends who dressed up as robots and walked around campus, occasionally pausing to dance to a Bee Gees song.

Another example. Our friends Ian and Bronwyn went around campus planting crocus bulbs for no particular reason — just to see them sprout in surprising places in the spring. For Ian’s birthday, Andrew and I got inspired by Addams Family II and decided to make Ian an angelfood cake — made from real angels. Well, not really. We made the angelfood cake, iced it, and then stuck in little plastic angel parts (heads, arms, legs, halos, etc…) that we found in a craft store. I wish I had a picture. The look on Ian’s face was precious.

And then there is the Improv Everywhere, which gets mobs together to do a lot of public stunts. Check out their Slo-Mo Home Depot and MP3 Experiments to see what I mean. Good stuff. Silly, social, creative, and mostly harmless.
Yeah, drugs that would be nice. I’m hardly an undergrad with the need to find cheap booze and wet t-shirts, but every now and then, you need to take a break … in spring … hence spring break. I’ve been to Amsterdam three times. Each one has been a trip to remember.

September 2001: my first trip for work reasons. I went to talk to the Open University of the Netherlands about their distance education programs. The weather was great. It would rain in short bursts throughout the day, but inevitably followed by a rainbow. There’s something nice about seeing rainbows all day. It feels like paradise. Of course, I returned to the U.S. on September 11 and they ended up routing our plane to Nova Scotia. We sat on the runway in that plane from about 11 AM to midnight while we were all on the plane trying to get cell phone service and find out what was going on. Planes were falling from the sky as far as we knew. Anyway, we ended up in a sports arena in Halifax overnight with the Red Cross providing some help.

November 2001: Yep, just a month and a half after the first trip, I went again, with Andrew this time. It was a very interesting Thanksgiving, which they don’t celebrate in the Netherlands of course. We enjoyed all of the streets stringed with lights and Christmas decorations. We also discovered all of the H&M stores and Holland Casino. Really, this trip was about discovering the hidden parts of the city. It’s harder than you would think because all of the building fronts are historical — without neon signs advertising that this mansion-looking thing is actually a mini-mall. We found a nice chocolate shop with herb-flavored chocolates: tea, basil, etc… Very good stuff.

May 2004: The flowers in The Netherlands peak in April, but it was still nice to go around the city and see them everywhere. We spent some time in the Bloomenmarket (Flower Market) and found a bunch of cafes where people of all ages hang out with the constant companionship of techno music. Did I mention paradise before?

Its more expensive to go there now because the dollar hasn’t done very well against the euro for the past couple of years. It used to be than one dollar was about 1.2 euros, but the exchange rates have switched since then. So this year, we’re going to try to pool our money together with some friends and get a place to share. If that doesn’t work out, we’re still going to take the time off, but it might be something simple. Maybe we should save Amsterdam for the summer.
This week, information pills Jeff gives an update on his Weight Watchers program, price we talk about a couple of exercise drink powders (Hornet Juice and President’s Choice), dealing with multiple podcasts and Nike+, and what our training plans look like between now and the 2008 Philadelphia Marathon. By the way, it was “The Running Shoe” that has the “I am an athlete” saying. Ashland Dave deserves a little love as well though.

Related Links:

You know, approved I really need to write more so I don’t seem like a viral marketing strategy for The Chumby, noun which I still lust after — but on to other things.

I’m a fan of harmless creative mischief. I’m not talking about those hidden camera shows, where someone is humiliated for the sake of ratings. Even if the target has a laugh afterward, it’s still pretty mean and the commerical aspect makes it mean for profit. Nope, not a good combination.

I’m a fan of those moments where people get together and do something just for the sake of the act itself. For example, I have a couple of friends who dressed up as robots and walked around campus, occasionally pausing to dance to a Bee Gees song.

Another example. Our friends Ian and Bronwyn went around campus planting crocus bulbs for no particular reason — just to see them sprout in surprising places in the spring. For Ian’s birthday, Andrew and I got inspired by Addams Family II and decided to make Ian an angelfood cake — made from real angels. Well, not really. We made the angelfood cake, iced it, and then stuck in little plastic angel parts (heads, arms, legs, halos, etc…) that we found in a craft store. I wish I had a picture. The look on Ian’s face was precious.

And then there is the Improv Everywhere, which gets mobs together to do a lot of public stunts. Check out their Slo-Mo Home Depot and MP3 Experiments to see what I mean. Good stuff. Silly, social, creative, and mostly harmless.
I have to say that I was totally blown away when I saw the iPhone that Apple is going to release this summer. I’ve heard the rumors before of course and thought there was a good chance that I would get one, pharmacy but I was expecting something with maybe a touch screen and probably a slide-out keyboard. I even said before the announcement that even if it is a non-smartphone, recipe I would still get one because I trust Apple to do cool things. But really, patient this is a whole new class of cool. The capabilities of the iPhone are nothing that you can’t string together from other devices, but leave it to Apple to take a stand on their seamless integration.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l2oMmCyiJZA]

The one really new thing is the multi-touch interface — I saw a desktop demo of such an interface before and it wowed me. I can’t wait until the time if/when Apple starts making laptops or a tablet that do the same thing. No more pointing and clicking…it feels more like you are interacting with the object itself. Apple and Nintendo (with the Wii) are on a similar trajectory here. And kudos to both companies for doing it right.

Posted in gadgets, iPhone, technologies | Comments Off on iPhone – Could it be that one thing?