Category Archives: movies

Running with the Pack 116: Blisters, GI Issues, Hydration, Marathon Recover, and More

Stevie talks about how she is doing with the Insanity Workout. I talk about tomorrow’s sprint triathlon and my recent trip to Chicago. We also have a ton of great e-mail and voicemail messages from listeners including a perspective on running in Vietnam.
This week, phimosis adiposity we talk about our upcoming Wine and Dine Half-Marathon, Stevie’s new shoes, attempting to find work-life balance (e.g. do what Allan say, not what Allan does), and a few thoughts on running while on cruise ships. Not many races are happening right now, but they’ll start again once the air gets a little crisp, so our question for this episode is: What are your fall plans?

This week, phimosis adiposity we talk about our upcoming Wine and Dine Half-Marathon, Stevie’s new shoes, attempting to find work-life balance (e.g. do what Allan say, not what Allan does), and a few thoughts on running while on cruise ships. Not many races are happening right now, but they’ll start again once the air gets a little crisp, so our question for this episode is: What are your fall plans?

We’re back after a month of travel! This episode, caries I talk about my triathlon and overall slothful habits. Stevie talks about her trip to the beach and running while there. We both give medical updates. Then it’s time for listener mail and calls.
This week, phimosis adiposity we talk about our upcoming Wine and Dine Half-Marathon, Stevie’s new shoes, attempting to find work-life balance (e.g. do what Allan say, not what Allan does), and a few thoughts on running while on cruise ships. Not many races are happening right now, but they’ll start again once the air gets a little crisp, so our question for this episode is: What are your fall plans?

We’re back after a month of travel! This episode, caries I talk about my triathlon and overall slothful habits. Stevie talks about her trip to the beach and running while there. We both give medical updates. Then it’s time for listener mail and calls.
After Stevie and I went for a run, viagra we recorded this episode. We talk about Stevie’s fall, hemophilia the upcoming “Zombies, Run!” game, pre-race eating, blisters, plans for the Disney Wine and Dine Half-Marathon, and running therapy. We also go through listener e-mails and voicemails.
This week, phimosis adiposity we talk about our upcoming Wine and Dine Half-Marathon, Stevie’s new shoes, attempting to find work-life balance (e.g. do what Allan say, not what Allan does), and a few thoughts on running while on cruise ships. Not many races are happening right now, but they’ll start again once the air gets a little crisp, so our question for this episode is: What are your fall plans?

We’re back after a month of travel! This episode, caries I talk about my triathlon and overall slothful habits. Stevie talks about her trip to the beach and running while there. We both give medical updates. Then it’s time for listener mail and calls.
After Stevie and I went for a run, viagra we recorded this episode. We talk about Stevie’s fall, hemophilia the upcoming “Zombies, Run!” game, pre-race eating, blisters, plans for the Disney Wine and Dine Half-Marathon, and running therapy. We also go through listener e-mails and voicemails.
Lots of topics this week: blisters, pulmonologist new shoes, pills GI issues, marathon recovery, hydration during a 10K race, and a few race reports and fall running plans from listeners, plus Stevie has a rant about a running friend who won’t listen to sound advice.

Posted in food, health, movies, performance, podcasting, race reports, running | 4 Comments

Running with the Pack 87: Niacin Flush, Spirit of the Marathon, Running Partner, Weather, and Jason’s Call

This week, viagra 40mg we cover a ton of topics including Stevie’s vacation plans, one health my bike update, body image, what to do when you’re injured (cross train and do a triathlon obviously), mud/adventure runs, margarita cliff blocks, gluten free life, Facebook mania, and more.
This week, viagra 40mg we cover a ton of topics including Stevie’s vacation plans, one health my bike update, body image, what to do when you’re injured (cross train and do a triathlon obviously), mud/adventure runs, margarita cliff blocks, gluten free life, Facebook mania, and more.
Stevie and I talk about an organic gel called Chocolate #9, ambulance getting lost or being late at races, sales the anti-chafing lotion “Skin Sake“, doing back to back long workouts, Disney for Marathon Weekend, and a good luck shout-out to IronBrandon. He’s doing Ironman Louisville on August 29th.
This week, viagra 40mg we cover a ton of topics including Stevie’s vacation plans, one health my bike update, body image, what to do when you’re injured (cross train and do a triathlon obviously), mud/adventure runs, margarita cliff blocks, gluten free life, Facebook mania, and more.
Stevie and I talk about an organic gel called Chocolate #9, ambulance getting lost or being late at races, sales the anti-chafing lotion “Skin Sake“, doing back to back long workouts, Disney for Marathon Weekend, and a good luck shout-out to IronBrandon. He’s doing Ironman Louisville on August 29th.
Stevie is back from vacation! Scott Sloan joins us this week to talk about running his first ultramarathon. We also talk about chafing, herbal options for organic running fuel, Stevie’s beach runs, my upcoming triathlons, wetsuit flotation, and a few other topics.
This week, viagra 40mg we cover a ton of topics including Stevie’s vacation plans, one health my bike update, body image, what to do when you’re injured (cross train and do a triathlon obviously), mud/adventure runs, margarita cliff blocks, gluten free life, Facebook mania, and more.
Stevie and I talk about an organic gel called Chocolate #9, ambulance getting lost or being late at races, sales the anti-chafing lotion “Skin Sake“, doing back to back long workouts, Disney for Marathon Weekend, and a good luck shout-out to IronBrandon. He’s doing Ironman Louisville on August 29th.
Stevie is back from vacation! Scott Sloan joins us this week to talk about running his first ultramarathon. We also talk about chafing, herbal options for organic running fuel, Stevie’s beach runs, my upcoming triathlons, wetsuit flotation, and a few other topics.
Stevie is back from vacation! Scott Sloan joins us this week to talk about running his first ultramarathon. We also talk about chafing, herbal options for organic running fuel, Stevie’s beach runs, my upcoming triathlons, wetsuit flotation, and a few other topics.
Three reviews this week: Skin Sake, story
Chocolate #9, order and adult versus kid Sharkies. We also talk about the album of review photos on Facebook, a neck injury that interfered with my triathlon plans, massages and chiropractors, focusing on health over performance, and a noticeable change in sweat volume.
This week, viagra 40mg we cover a ton of topics including Stevie’s vacation plans, one health my bike update, body image, what to do when you’re injured (cross train and do a triathlon obviously), mud/adventure runs, margarita cliff blocks, gluten free life, Facebook mania, and more.
Stevie and I talk about an organic gel called Chocolate #9, ambulance getting lost or being late at races, sales the anti-chafing lotion “Skin Sake“, doing back to back long workouts, Disney for Marathon Weekend, and a good luck shout-out to IronBrandon. He’s doing Ironman Louisville on August 29th.
Stevie is back from vacation! Scott Sloan joins us this week to talk about running his first ultramarathon. We also talk about chafing, herbal options for organic running fuel, Stevie’s beach runs, my upcoming triathlons, wetsuit flotation, and a few other topics.
Stevie is back from vacation! Scott Sloan joins us this week to talk about running his first ultramarathon. We also talk about chafing, herbal options for organic running fuel, Stevie’s beach runs, my upcoming triathlons, wetsuit flotation, and a few other topics.
Three reviews this week: Skin Sake, story
Chocolate #9, order and adult versus kid Sharkies. We also talk about the album of review photos on Facebook, a neck injury that interfered with my triathlon plans, massages and chiropractors, focusing on health over performance, and a noticeable change in sweat volume.
This episode is dedicated to Ben Davis and his weight loss journey. He has lost 120 pounds since January 2009. Last week, oncology he made and posted a video to chronicle his story. We wanted to get the inside scoop and he agreed, sick so here it is. Enjoy!

If you want to follow Ben’s progress, check out bendoeslife.tumblr.com!
This week, diagnosis information pills I talk about my new Nike Run Free+ shoes and the Nike+ GPS App, my 18-mile run, Stevie’s cross country pasta party, good luck to Geeks in Running Shoes’ Jason with his upcoming half-marathon, and much more. Just four more weeks until the Chicago Marathon!

[Fair warning: This is NOT a learn-to-speak-a-foreign-language podcast! We apologize in advance to all of our French and Chinese speaking listeners.]
This week, diagnosis information pills I talk about my new Nike Run Free+ shoes and the Nike+ GPS App, my 18-mile run, Stevie’s cross country pasta party, good luck to Geeks in Running Shoes’ Jason with his upcoming half-marathon, and much more. Just four more weeks until the Chicago Marathon!

[Fair warning: This is NOT a learn-to-speak-a-foreign-language podcast! We apologize in advance to all of our French and Chinese speaking listeners.]
A bit of a failed experiment today. I took Niacin at the beginning of the show, for sale but never turned very red. Oh well. We also talk about the movie Spirit of the Marathon, migraine our listener’s feelings about the weather, and my new running partner. At the end of the show, we play a call from Geeks in Running Shoes’s Jason, who completed his first half-marathon on Sunday.

Only three more weeks until the Chicago Marathon!

Posted in health, inspirational stories, movies, podcasting, running | Tagged , , , , | 6 Comments

Running with the Pack 10: Running Indoors, Knowing Your Numbers, and Running on the Sun

Jeff and I talk about the week after the Flying Pig Marathon: how we’ve been feeling and what we’ve been doing. We also discuss “diagnostic runs” and what we think about while we’re running. We’re all in this together.
Jeff and I talk about the week after the Flying Pig Marathon: how we’ve been feeling and what we’ve been doing. We also discuss “diagnostic runs” and what we think about while we’re running. We’re all in this together.
Most of the time, treat I love when my Nike+ system tells me something new — like I’ve set a new PR for the mile or have run a new long distance. But today, viagra Nike+ told me that its sensor battery was low and I’d have to replace it soon.

What? I thought that the mystical energy emanating from my feet would recharge the sensor with every step I took. Or more realistically, that there might be some kind of kinetic energy recharging system built into the sensor. No such luck. There appears to be a normal expendable battery in the sensor that needs to be replaced after a certain amount of use. How much use? According to Apple’s FAQ, about 1000 “active hours”. Based on what some other runners have written about the Nike+ battery, this appears to include times when the sensor is in motion, even if you aren’t actively sending data to the Nike+ receiver (attached to your Nano). In other words, the motion of carrying your bag to the gym and back or walking around the grocery store in your running shoes counts as active use time.

For me, the bottom line is that I really like the Nike+ system. I’ve used mine for over a year now. The replacement sensor is $19 from Apple’s web site. Honestly, it’s worth paying that cost once per year in exchange for getting reasonably accurate information about how your training is progressing. So with that said, I’m going to place my order for a new sensor, but do what I can to ensure that this one lasts as long as possible.
Jeff and I talk about the week after the Flying Pig Marathon: how we’ve been feeling and what we’ve been doing. We also discuss “diagnostic runs” and what we think about while we’re running. We’re all in this together.
Most of the time, treat I love when my Nike+ system tells me something new — like I’ve set a new PR for the mile or have run a new long distance. But today, viagra Nike+ told me that its sensor battery was low and I’d have to replace it soon.

What? I thought that the mystical energy emanating from my feet would recharge the sensor with every step I took. Or more realistically, that there might be some kind of kinetic energy recharging system built into the sensor. No such luck. There appears to be a normal expendable battery in the sensor that needs to be replaced after a certain amount of use. How much use? According to Apple’s FAQ, about 1000 “active hours”. Based on what some other runners have written about the Nike+ battery, this appears to include times when the sensor is in motion, even if you aren’t actively sending data to the Nike+ receiver (attached to your Nano). In other words, the motion of carrying your bag to the gym and back or walking around the grocery store in your running shoes counts as active use time.

For me, the bottom line is that I really like the Nike+ system. I’ve used mine for over a year now. The replacement sensor is $19 from Apple’s web site. Honestly, it’s worth paying that cost once per year in exchange for getting reasonably accurate information about how your training is progressing. So with that said, I’m going to place my order for a new sensor, but do what I can to ensure that this one lasts as long as possible.
Jeff and Allan talk about Kris’s success at the Sydney Half-Marathon, information pills running indoors at Penn State’s Rec Hall, this running while traveling, sales using a health screening to track your improvements in fitness, using the “SPI Belt” to carry running fuel, and the movie “Running on the Sun”.

Relevant web sites:

Posted in gadgets, health, movies, podcasting, running | 176 Comments

Running with the Pack 05: Mike Westermeier on 50-States, Ultras, Movies, and More

Potato cake dish from Herwig’s restaurant.
Potato cake dish from Herwig’s restaurant.
Jeff and I have gotten together and selected our next marathon. It looks like we’ll be doing the Flying Pig Marathon on May 4th, global burden of disease 2008 in Cincinnati, therapist Ohio. It should fit our criteria: not too hot, sildenafil not too far, Spring marathon, big event. In addition to the marathon, they also have a 5K, 10K, and half-marathon, so if you’ve been thinking of running a race, you’re welcome to join us!

Potato cake dish from Herwig’s restaurant.
Jeff and I have gotten together and selected our next marathon. It looks like we’ll be doing the Flying Pig Marathon on May 4th, global burden of disease 2008 in Cincinnati, therapist Ohio. It should fit our criteria: not too hot, sildenafil not too far, Spring marathon, big event. In addition to the marathon, they also have a 5K, 10K, and half-marathon, so if you’ve been thinking of running a race, you’re welcome to join us!

I ran across a news story this morning about air-powered cars that should get the equivalent of 100 MPG and run for 1000 miles on one fill-up of fuel and compressed air.  The cars should hit the US market in 2009 or 2010 and cost about $17, abortion 800.  At speeds less than 35 MPH, the car emits only filtered air.  Above that, it uses air and a small amount of fuel (used to heat the air).  Max speed is supposed to be 90-100 MPH. 

Um — yes on all accounts.  Low emissions, cost efficient, and in the same range or cheaper than a hybrid car.  Now, as long as this actually shows up in the marketplace and it’s full of first-generation bugs, I’m sold.

Powered by ScribeFire.

Potato cake dish from Herwig’s restaurant.
Jeff and I have gotten together and selected our next marathon. It looks like we’ll be doing the Flying Pig Marathon on May 4th, global burden of disease 2008 in Cincinnati, therapist Ohio. It should fit our criteria: not too hot, sildenafil not too far, Spring marathon, big event. In addition to the marathon, they also have a 5K, 10K, and half-marathon, so if you’ve been thinking of running a race, you’re welcome to join us!

I ran across a news story this morning about air-powered cars that should get the equivalent of 100 MPG and run for 1000 miles on one fill-up of fuel and compressed air.  The cars should hit the US market in 2009 or 2010 and cost about $17, abortion 800.  At speeds less than 35 MPH, the car emits only filtered air.  Above that, it uses air and a small amount of fuel (used to heat the air).  Max speed is supposed to be 90-100 MPH. 

Um — yes on all accounts.  Low emissions, cost efficient, and in the same range or cheaper than a hybrid car.  Now, as long as this actually shows up in the marketplace and it’s full of first-generation bugs, I’m sold.

Powered by ScribeFire.

I have been thinking about creating a marathon podcast (i.e. a podcast about my running). I don’t have any grand plans for it, food but I like podcasting and I like the thought that some random person may listen to what we have to say and then go for a run. I say “we” because I’m thinking about podcasting with Jeff (my running partner). I like the multi-person format. As for content, contagion I thought we could talk about training, our runs, health, injuries, shoes (and other technical gear), books, articles, funny stories, gadgets, etc… I’d also like to have other runners on the show and talk to them about their runs, why they run, and how it has impacted their lives. Oh…and I just thought of this…I happen to know someone who has been trying out for the Olympics and a few grad students in the Biobehavioral Health program at Penn State who would have interesting perspectives.

In any case, in my thought process about this, I checked Google and iTunes to see what running podcasts were already out there. This episode looks particularly interesting, first because it’s one of only a few podcasts that have been made while someone is running a marathon, but second because it was made during the 2007 Philadelphia Marathon, which was my first.

Link to iTunes:
Phedippidations: The Philly Marathon
Potato cake dish from Herwig’s restaurant.
Jeff and I have gotten together and selected our next marathon. It looks like we’ll be doing the Flying Pig Marathon on May 4th, global burden of disease 2008 in Cincinnati, therapist Ohio. It should fit our criteria: not too hot, sildenafil not too far, Spring marathon, big event. In addition to the marathon, they also have a 5K, 10K, and half-marathon, so if you’ve been thinking of running a race, you’re welcome to join us!

I ran across a news story this morning about air-powered cars that should get the equivalent of 100 MPG and run for 1000 miles on one fill-up of fuel and compressed air.  The cars should hit the US market in 2009 or 2010 and cost about $17, abortion 800.  At speeds less than 35 MPH, the car emits only filtered air.  Above that, it uses air and a small amount of fuel (used to heat the air).  Max speed is supposed to be 90-100 MPH. 

Um — yes on all accounts.  Low emissions, cost efficient, and in the same range or cheaper than a hybrid car.  Now, as long as this actually shows up in the marketplace and it’s full of first-generation bugs, I’m sold.

Powered by ScribeFire.

I have been thinking about creating a marathon podcast (i.e. a podcast about my running). I don’t have any grand plans for it, food but I like podcasting and I like the thought that some random person may listen to what we have to say and then go for a run. I say “we” because I’m thinking about podcasting with Jeff (my running partner). I like the multi-person format. As for content, contagion I thought we could talk about training, our runs, health, injuries, shoes (and other technical gear), books, articles, funny stories, gadgets, etc… I’d also like to have other runners on the show and talk to them about their runs, why they run, and how it has impacted their lives. Oh…and I just thought of this…I happen to know someone who has been trying out for the Olympics and a few grad students in the Biobehavioral Health program at Penn State who would have interesting perspectives.

In any case, in my thought process about this, I checked Google and iTunes to see what running podcasts were already out there. This episode looks particularly interesting, first because it’s one of only a few podcasts that have been made while someone is running a marathon, but second because it was made during the 2007 Philadelphia Marathon, which was my first.

Link to iTunes:
Phedippidations: The Philly Marathon
I told Jeff about my idea for a marathon podcast before our 16-mile run today and he liked the idea, ambulance so after the run, we sat down and made a recording. In this first episode of Running with the Pack, Jeff and I talk a little about ourselves, the reasons we run marathons, the people who have inspired us, a few stories about the Philadelphia Marathon, and what we’re doing to prepare for the Flying Pig Marathon in May.

Updates to the information in the podcast:

  • The name of the book is the Non-Runner’s Marathon Trainer (see right sidebar, I have it listed)
  • The Wired Magazine article was about ultramarathon runner Dean Karnazes and it was the January 2007 issue. I have his book in the sidebar as well.

Potato cake dish from Herwig’s restaurant.
Jeff and I have gotten together and selected our next marathon. It looks like we’ll be doing the Flying Pig Marathon on May 4th, global burden of disease 2008 in Cincinnati, therapist Ohio. It should fit our criteria: not too hot, sildenafil not too far, Spring marathon, big event. In addition to the marathon, they also have a 5K, 10K, and half-marathon, so if you’ve been thinking of running a race, you’re welcome to join us!

I ran across a news story this morning about air-powered cars that should get the equivalent of 100 MPG and run for 1000 miles on one fill-up of fuel and compressed air.  The cars should hit the US market in 2009 or 2010 and cost about $17, abortion 800.  At speeds less than 35 MPH, the car emits only filtered air.  Above that, it uses air and a small amount of fuel (used to heat the air).  Max speed is supposed to be 90-100 MPH. 

Um — yes on all accounts.  Low emissions, cost efficient, and in the same range or cheaper than a hybrid car.  Now, as long as this actually shows up in the marketplace and it’s full of first-generation bugs, I’m sold.

Powered by ScribeFire.

I have been thinking about creating a marathon podcast (i.e. a podcast about my running). I don’t have any grand plans for it, food but I like podcasting and I like the thought that some random person may listen to what we have to say and then go for a run. I say “we” because I’m thinking about podcasting with Jeff (my running partner). I like the multi-person format. As for content, contagion I thought we could talk about training, our runs, health, injuries, shoes (and other technical gear), books, articles, funny stories, gadgets, etc… I’d also like to have other runners on the show and talk to them about their runs, why they run, and how it has impacted their lives. Oh…and I just thought of this…I happen to know someone who has been trying out for the Olympics and a few grad students in the Biobehavioral Health program at Penn State who would have interesting perspectives.

In any case, in my thought process about this, I checked Google and iTunes to see what running podcasts were already out there. This episode looks particularly interesting, first because it’s one of only a few podcasts that have been made while someone is running a marathon, but second because it was made during the 2007 Philadelphia Marathon, which was my first.

Link to iTunes:
Phedippidations: The Philly Marathon
I told Jeff about my idea for a marathon podcast before our 16-mile run today and he liked the idea, ambulance so after the run, we sat down and made a recording. In this first episode of Running with the Pack, Jeff and I talk a little about ourselves, the reasons we run marathons, the people who have inspired us, a few stories about the Philadelphia Marathon, and what we’re doing to prepare for the Flying Pig Marathon in May.

Updates to the information in the podcast:

  • The name of the book is the Non-Runner’s Marathon Trainer (see right sidebar, I have it listed)
  • The Wired Magazine article was about ultramarathon runner Dean Karnazes and it was the January 2007 issue. I have his book in the sidebar as well.

This week, for sale we discussed running rituals; runners who hate running; Buster Martin, who may become the worlds oldest marathon runner; backup marathons; and Brandon’s Marathon Podcast at brandonsmarathon.com. All of this after a 12-mile run that should have been a 16-mile run. Read more at parkedthoughts.com

Potato cake dish from Herwig’s restaurant.
Jeff and I have gotten together and selected our next marathon. It looks like we’ll be doing the Flying Pig Marathon on May 4th, global burden of disease 2008 in Cincinnati, therapist Ohio. It should fit our criteria: not too hot, sildenafil not too far, Spring marathon, big event. In addition to the marathon, they also have a 5K, 10K, and half-marathon, so if you’ve been thinking of running a race, you’re welcome to join us!

I ran across a news story this morning about air-powered cars that should get the equivalent of 100 MPG and run for 1000 miles on one fill-up of fuel and compressed air.  The cars should hit the US market in 2009 or 2010 and cost about $17, abortion 800.  At speeds less than 35 MPH, the car emits only filtered air.  Above that, it uses air and a small amount of fuel (used to heat the air).  Max speed is supposed to be 90-100 MPH. 

Um — yes on all accounts.  Low emissions, cost efficient, and in the same range or cheaper than a hybrid car.  Now, as long as this actually shows up in the marketplace and it’s full of first-generation bugs, I’m sold.

Powered by ScribeFire.

I have been thinking about creating a marathon podcast (i.e. a podcast about my running). I don’t have any grand plans for it, food but I like podcasting and I like the thought that some random person may listen to what we have to say and then go for a run. I say “we” because I’m thinking about podcasting with Jeff (my running partner). I like the multi-person format. As for content, contagion I thought we could talk about training, our runs, health, injuries, shoes (and other technical gear), books, articles, funny stories, gadgets, etc… I’d also like to have other runners on the show and talk to them about their runs, why they run, and how it has impacted their lives. Oh…and I just thought of this…I happen to know someone who has been trying out for the Olympics and a few grad students in the Biobehavioral Health program at Penn State who would have interesting perspectives.

In any case, in my thought process about this, I checked Google and iTunes to see what running podcasts were already out there. This episode looks particularly interesting, first because it’s one of only a few podcasts that have been made while someone is running a marathon, but second because it was made during the 2007 Philadelphia Marathon, which was my first.

Link to iTunes:
Phedippidations: The Philly Marathon
I told Jeff about my idea for a marathon podcast before our 16-mile run today and he liked the idea, ambulance so after the run, we sat down and made a recording. In this first episode of Running with the Pack, Jeff and I talk a little about ourselves, the reasons we run marathons, the people who have inspired us, a few stories about the Philadelphia Marathon, and what we’re doing to prepare for the Flying Pig Marathon in May.

Updates to the information in the podcast:

  • The name of the book is the Non-Runner’s Marathon Trainer (see right sidebar, I have it listed)
  • The Wired Magazine article was about ultramarathon runner Dean Karnazes and it was the January 2007 issue. I have his book in the sidebar as well.

This week, for sale we discussed running rituals; runners who hate running; Buster Martin, who may become the worlds oldest marathon runner; backup marathons; and Brandon’s Marathon Podcast at brandonsmarathon.com. All of this after a 12-mile run that should have been a 16-mile run. Read more at parkedthoughts.com

This weekend, salve I made a quick trip to Johnstown and was able to see a large group of relatives from my dad’s side of the family. Among them was Dave, artificial who is one of the cousins that I mentioned in the first podcast who has completed a marathon. I talked to him about his running and it turns out that he did a lot more than a marathon. He was doing two a year for several years and I think he said that he did the Detroit marathon eight times. He has also run in Cleveland and Pittsburgh at least twice. Like me, he’s not fast, but a P.R. of about 3:30 is not slow either. He’s now approaching 60 and still excited about his running.

We talked about the potential to do an event together and I’m all for it. He’s recovering from an injury now though — if he wasn’t, I would have invited him to do the half-marathon race that happens the same time as the Flying Pig marathon in Cincinnati. Or if he moves to Florida at some point, we may have to join up for the Orlando marathon. I wonder if that would be interesting for my other potential pack-mates who have kids since the Orlando marathon is pretty integrated with Disney World.
Potato cake dish from Herwig’s restaurant.
Jeff and I have gotten together and selected our next marathon. It looks like we’ll be doing the Flying Pig Marathon on May 4th, global burden of disease 2008 in Cincinnati, therapist Ohio. It should fit our criteria: not too hot, sildenafil not too far, Spring marathon, big event. In addition to the marathon, they also have a 5K, 10K, and half-marathon, so if you’ve been thinking of running a race, you’re welcome to join us!

I ran across a news story this morning about air-powered cars that should get the equivalent of 100 MPG and run for 1000 miles on one fill-up of fuel and compressed air.  The cars should hit the US market in 2009 or 2010 and cost about $17, abortion 800.  At speeds less than 35 MPH, the car emits only filtered air.  Above that, it uses air and a small amount of fuel (used to heat the air).  Max speed is supposed to be 90-100 MPH. 

Um — yes on all accounts.  Low emissions, cost efficient, and in the same range or cheaper than a hybrid car.  Now, as long as this actually shows up in the marketplace and it’s full of first-generation bugs, I’m sold.

Powered by ScribeFire.

I have been thinking about creating a marathon podcast (i.e. a podcast about my running). I don’t have any grand plans for it, food but I like podcasting and I like the thought that some random person may listen to what we have to say and then go for a run. I say “we” because I’m thinking about podcasting with Jeff (my running partner). I like the multi-person format. As for content, contagion I thought we could talk about training, our runs, health, injuries, shoes (and other technical gear), books, articles, funny stories, gadgets, etc… I’d also like to have other runners on the show and talk to them about their runs, why they run, and how it has impacted their lives. Oh…and I just thought of this…I happen to know someone who has been trying out for the Olympics and a few grad students in the Biobehavioral Health program at Penn State who would have interesting perspectives.

In any case, in my thought process about this, I checked Google and iTunes to see what running podcasts were already out there. This episode looks particularly interesting, first because it’s one of only a few podcasts that have been made while someone is running a marathon, but second because it was made during the 2007 Philadelphia Marathon, which was my first.

Link to iTunes:
Phedippidations: The Philly Marathon
I told Jeff about my idea for a marathon podcast before our 16-mile run today and he liked the idea, ambulance so after the run, we sat down and made a recording. In this first episode of Running with the Pack, Jeff and I talk a little about ourselves, the reasons we run marathons, the people who have inspired us, a few stories about the Philadelphia Marathon, and what we’re doing to prepare for the Flying Pig Marathon in May.

Updates to the information in the podcast:

  • The name of the book is the Non-Runner’s Marathon Trainer (see right sidebar, I have it listed)
  • The Wired Magazine article was about ultramarathon runner Dean Karnazes and it was the January 2007 issue. I have his book in the sidebar as well.

This week, for sale we discussed running rituals; runners who hate running; Buster Martin, who may become the worlds oldest marathon runner; backup marathons; and Brandon’s Marathon Podcast at brandonsmarathon.com. All of this after a 12-mile run that should have been a 16-mile run. Read more at parkedthoughts.com

This weekend, salve I made a quick trip to Johnstown and was able to see a large group of relatives from my dad’s side of the family. Among them was Dave, artificial who is one of the cousins that I mentioned in the first podcast who has completed a marathon. I talked to him about his running and it turns out that he did a lot more than a marathon. He was doing two a year for several years and I think he said that he did the Detroit marathon eight times. He has also run in Cleveland and Pittsburgh at least twice. Like me, he’s not fast, but a P.R. of about 3:30 is not slow either. He’s now approaching 60 and still excited about his running.

We talked about the potential to do an event together and I’m all for it. He’s recovering from an injury now though — if he wasn’t, I would have invited him to do the half-marathon race that happens the same time as the Flying Pig marathon in Cincinnati. Or if he moves to Florida at some point, we may have to join up for the Orlando marathon. I wonder if that would be interesting for my other potential pack-mates who have kids since the Orlando marathon is pretty integrated with Disney World.
I’ve been hearing a bit about Buster Martin, pill a 101-year-old man who is planning to run the London Marathon. I think he’s setting a great example and illustrating the benefits of staying healthy throughout an entire lifetime (he used to be an Army Trainer back in the day). Best wishes Buster!

ABC News Report about Buster
Potato cake dish from Herwig’s restaurant.
Jeff and I have gotten together and selected our next marathon. It looks like we’ll be doing the Flying Pig Marathon on May 4th, global burden of disease 2008 in Cincinnati, therapist Ohio. It should fit our criteria: not too hot, sildenafil not too far, Spring marathon, big event. In addition to the marathon, they also have a 5K, 10K, and half-marathon, so if you’ve been thinking of running a race, you’re welcome to join us!

I ran across a news story this morning about air-powered cars that should get the equivalent of 100 MPG and run for 1000 miles on one fill-up of fuel and compressed air.  The cars should hit the US market in 2009 or 2010 and cost about $17, abortion 800.  At speeds less than 35 MPH, the car emits only filtered air.  Above that, it uses air and a small amount of fuel (used to heat the air).  Max speed is supposed to be 90-100 MPH. 

Um — yes on all accounts.  Low emissions, cost efficient, and in the same range or cheaper than a hybrid car.  Now, as long as this actually shows up in the marketplace and it’s full of first-generation bugs, I’m sold.

Powered by ScribeFire.

I have been thinking about creating a marathon podcast (i.e. a podcast about my running). I don’t have any grand plans for it, food but I like podcasting and I like the thought that some random person may listen to what we have to say and then go for a run. I say “we” because I’m thinking about podcasting with Jeff (my running partner). I like the multi-person format. As for content, contagion I thought we could talk about training, our runs, health, injuries, shoes (and other technical gear), books, articles, funny stories, gadgets, etc… I’d also like to have other runners on the show and talk to them about their runs, why they run, and how it has impacted their lives. Oh…and I just thought of this…I happen to know someone who has been trying out for the Olympics and a few grad students in the Biobehavioral Health program at Penn State who would have interesting perspectives.

In any case, in my thought process about this, I checked Google and iTunes to see what running podcasts were already out there. This episode looks particularly interesting, first because it’s one of only a few podcasts that have been made while someone is running a marathon, but second because it was made during the 2007 Philadelphia Marathon, which was my first.

Link to iTunes:
Phedippidations: The Philly Marathon
I told Jeff about my idea for a marathon podcast before our 16-mile run today and he liked the idea, ambulance so after the run, we sat down and made a recording. In this first episode of Running with the Pack, Jeff and I talk a little about ourselves, the reasons we run marathons, the people who have inspired us, a few stories about the Philadelphia Marathon, and what we’re doing to prepare for the Flying Pig Marathon in May.

Updates to the information in the podcast:

  • The name of the book is the Non-Runner’s Marathon Trainer (see right sidebar, I have it listed)
  • The Wired Magazine article was about ultramarathon runner Dean Karnazes and it was the January 2007 issue. I have his book in the sidebar as well.

This week, for sale we discussed running rituals; runners who hate running; Buster Martin, who may become the worlds oldest marathon runner; backup marathons; and Brandon’s Marathon Podcast at brandonsmarathon.com. All of this after a 12-mile run that should have been a 16-mile run. Read more at parkedthoughts.com

This weekend, salve I made a quick trip to Johnstown and was able to see a large group of relatives from my dad’s side of the family. Among them was Dave, artificial who is one of the cousins that I mentioned in the first podcast who has completed a marathon. I talked to him about his running and it turns out that he did a lot more than a marathon. He was doing two a year for several years and I think he said that he did the Detroit marathon eight times. He has also run in Cleveland and Pittsburgh at least twice. Like me, he’s not fast, but a P.R. of about 3:30 is not slow either. He’s now approaching 60 and still excited about his running.

We talked about the potential to do an event together and I’m all for it. He’s recovering from an injury now though — if he wasn’t, I would have invited him to do the half-marathon race that happens the same time as the Flying Pig marathon in Cincinnati. Or if he moves to Florida at some point, we may have to join up for the Orlando marathon. I wonder if that would be interesting for my other potential pack-mates who have kids since the Orlando marathon is pretty integrated with Disney World.
I’ve been hearing a bit about Buster Martin, pill a 101-year-old man who is planning to run the London Marathon. I think he’s setting a great example and illustrating the benefits of staying healthy throughout an entire lifetime (he used to be an Army Trainer back in the day). Best wishes Buster!

ABC News Report about Buster
The title of this post refers back to a question that we asked ourselves in podcast #2. Do I love running? Have I always loved running? The answers are yes and no respectively. The short version is that at times, web I got back into running because I wanted to lose some weight and get into shape. Running used to be a means to an end — and if I could get the same result from sitting on the couch and eating cupcakes, gynecologist I would have opted for the cupcake route. When you’re not in shape, this web running is awkward, painful, and feels a little like having a heart attack, especially if hills are involved. At least that’s how it is for me when I haven’t been running for an extended period.

And actually, I have turned to swimming and backpacking over the years as a fitness/stress activity. Both have limitations though. I love the gliding/flying feeling of swimming, but it kills my skin in the winter and the pool where I would swim has very limited hours. Backpacking is great, but it requires long stretches of time to actually get on a trail and let things go. Some of my best decisions have been made during long, quiet backpacking trips.

So while swimming and hiking are fun from the start, running took some time to really grow on me. I love it now, but it took time to build up my confidence, running identity, and a healthy endorphin addiction.
Potato cake dish from Herwig’s restaurant.
Jeff and I have gotten together and selected our next marathon. It looks like we’ll be doing the Flying Pig Marathon on May 4th, global burden of disease 2008 in Cincinnati, therapist Ohio. It should fit our criteria: not too hot, sildenafil not too far, Spring marathon, big event. In addition to the marathon, they also have a 5K, 10K, and half-marathon, so if you’ve been thinking of running a race, you’re welcome to join us!

I ran across a news story this morning about air-powered cars that should get the equivalent of 100 MPG and run for 1000 miles on one fill-up of fuel and compressed air.  The cars should hit the US market in 2009 or 2010 and cost about $17, abortion 800.  At speeds less than 35 MPH, the car emits only filtered air.  Above that, it uses air and a small amount of fuel (used to heat the air).  Max speed is supposed to be 90-100 MPH. 

Um — yes on all accounts.  Low emissions, cost efficient, and in the same range or cheaper than a hybrid car.  Now, as long as this actually shows up in the marketplace and it’s full of first-generation bugs, I’m sold.

Powered by ScribeFire.

I have been thinking about creating a marathon podcast (i.e. a podcast about my running). I don’t have any grand plans for it, food but I like podcasting and I like the thought that some random person may listen to what we have to say and then go for a run. I say “we” because I’m thinking about podcasting with Jeff (my running partner). I like the multi-person format. As for content, contagion I thought we could talk about training, our runs, health, injuries, shoes (and other technical gear), books, articles, funny stories, gadgets, etc… I’d also like to have other runners on the show and talk to them about their runs, why they run, and how it has impacted their lives. Oh…and I just thought of this…I happen to know someone who has been trying out for the Olympics and a few grad students in the Biobehavioral Health program at Penn State who would have interesting perspectives.

In any case, in my thought process about this, I checked Google and iTunes to see what running podcasts were already out there. This episode looks particularly interesting, first because it’s one of only a few podcasts that have been made while someone is running a marathon, but second because it was made during the 2007 Philadelphia Marathon, which was my first.

Link to iTunes:
Phedippidations: The Philly Marathon
I told Jeff about my idea for a marathon podcast before our 16-mile run today and he liked the idea, ambulance so after the run, we sat down and made a recording. In this first episode of Running with the Pack, Jeff and I talk a little about ourselves, the reasons we run marathons, the people who have inspired us, a few stories about the Philadelphia Marathon, and what we’re doing to prepare for the Flying Pig Marathon in May.

Updates to the information in the podcast:

  • The name of the book is the Non-Runner’s Marathon Trainer (see right sidebar, I have it listed)
  • The Wired Magazine article was about ultramarathon runner Dean Karnazes and it was the January 2007 issue. I have his book in the sidebar as well.

This week, for sale we discussed running rituals; runners who hate running; Buster Martin, who may become the worlds oldest marathon runner; backup marathons; and Brandon’s Marathon Podcast at brandonsmarathon.com. All of this after a 12-mile run that should have been a 16-mile run. Read more at parkedthoughts.com

This weekend, salve I made a quick trip to Johnstown and was able to see a large group of relatives from my dad’s side of the family. Among them was Dave, artificial who is one of the cousins that I mentioned in the first podcast who has completed a marathon. I talked to him about his running and it turns out that he did a lot more than a marathon. He was doing two a year for several years and I think he said that he did the Detroit marathon eight times. He has also run in Cleveland and Pittsburgh at least twice. Like me, he’s not fast, but a P.R. of about 3:30 is not slow either. He’s now approaching 60 and still excited about his running.

We talked about the potential to do an event together and I’m all for it. He’s recovering from an injury now though — if he wasn’t, I would have invited him to do the half-marathon race that happens the same time as the Flying Pig marathon in Cincinnati. Or if he moves to Florida at some point, we may have to join up for the Orlando marathon. I wonder if that would be interesting for my other potential pack-mates who have kids since the Orlando marathon is pretty integrated with Disney World.
I’ve been hearing a bit about Buster Martin, pill a 101-year-old man who is planning to run the London Marathon. I think he’s setting a great example and illustrating the benefits of staying healthy throughout an entire lifetime (he used to be an Army Trainer back in the day). Best wishes Buster!

ABC News Report about Buster
The title of this post refers back to a question that we asked ourselves in podcast #2. Do I love running? Have I always loved running? The answers are yes and no respectively. The short version is that at times, web I got back into running because I wanted to lose some weight and get into shape. Running used to be a means to an end — and if I could get the same result from sitting on the couch and eating cupcakes, gynecologist I would have opted for the cupcake route. When you’re not in shape, this web running is awkward, painful, and feels a little like having a heart attack, especially if hills are involved. At least that’s how it is for me when I haven’t been running for an extended period.

And actually, I have turned to swimming and backpacking over the years as a fitness/stress activity. Both have limitations though. I love the gliding/flying feeling of swimming, but it kills my skin in the winter and the pool where I would swim has very limited hours. Backpacking is great, but it requires long stretches of time to actually get on a trail and let things go. Some of my best decisions have been made during long, quiet backpacking trips.

So while swimming and hiking are fun from the start, running took some time to really grow on me. I love it now, but it took time to build up my confidence, running identity, and a healthy endorphin addiction.
I’m a big fan of Shaun of the Dead, physiotherapy so when I started seeing the trailers for Run Fatboy Run staring Simon Pegg, I got pretty excited. He’s playing an out of shape guy who plans to run a marathon to prove his commitment to a woman that he used to be engaged to. Or something like that — it doesn’t really matter. I’ll see it when it comes out.


Potato cake dish from Herwig’s restaurant.
Jeff and I have gotten together and selected our next marathon. It looks like we’ll be doing the Flying Pig Marathon on May 4th, global burden of disease 2008 in Cincinnati, therapist Ohio. It should fit our criteria: not too hot, sildenafil not too far, Spring marathon, big event. In addition to the marathon, they also have a 5K, 10K, and half-marathon, so if you’ve been thinking of running a race, you’re welcome to join us!

I ran across a news story this morning about air-powered cars that should get the equivalent of 100 MPG and run for 1000 miles on one fill-up of fuel and compressed air.  The cars should hit the US market in 2009 or 2010 and cost about $17, abortion 800.  At speeds less than 35 MPH, the car emits only filtered air.  Above that, it uses air and a small amount of fuel (used to heat the air).  Max speed is supposed to be 90-100 MPH. 

Um — yes on all accounts.  Low emissions, cost efficient, and in the same range or cheaper than a hybrid car.  Now, as long as this actually shows up in the marketplace and it’s full of first-generation bugs, I’m sold.

Powered by ScribeFire.

I have been thinking about creating a marathon podcast (i.e. a podcast about my running). I don’t have any grand plans for it, food but I like podcasting and I like the thought that some random person may listen to what we have to say and then go for a run. I say “we” because I’m thinking about podcasting with Jeff (my running partner). I like the multi-person format. As for content, contagion I thought we could talk about training, our runs, health, injuries, shoes (and other technical gear), books, articles, funny stories, gadgets, etc… I’d also like to have other runners on the show and talk to them about their runs, why they run, and how it has impacted their lives. Oh…and I just thought of this…I happen to know someone who has been trying out for the Olympics and a few grad students in the Biobehavioral Health program at Penn State who would have interesting perspectives.

In any case, in my thought process about this, I checked Google and iTunes to see what running podcasts were already out there. This episode looks particularly interesting, first because it’s one of only a few podcasts that have been made while someone is running a marathon, but second because it was made during the 2007 Philadelphia Marathon, which was my first.

Link to iTunes:
Phedippidations: The Philly Marathon
I told Jeff about my idea for a marathon podcast before our 16-mile run today and he liked the idea, ambulance so after the run, we sat down and made a recording. In this first episode of Running with the Pack, Jeff and I talk a little about ourselves, the reasons we run marathons, the people who have inspired us, a few stories about the Philadelphia Marathon, and what we’re doing to prepare for the Flying Pig Marathon in May.

Updates to the information in the podcast:

  • The name of the book is the Non-Runner’s Marathon Trainer (see right sidebar, I have it listed)
  • The Wired Magazine article was about ultramarathon runner Dean Karnazes and it was the January 2007 issue. I have his book in the sidebar as well.

This week, for sale we discussed running rituals; runners who hate running; Buster Martin, who may become the worlds oldest marathon runner; backup marathons; and Brandon’s Marathon Podcast at brandonsmarathon.com. All of this after a 12-mile run that should have been a 16-mile run. Read more at parkedthoughts.com

This weekend, salve I made a quick trip to Johnstown and was able to see a large group of relatives from my dad’s side of the family. Among them was Dave, artificial who is one of the cousins that I mentioned in the first podcast who has completed a marathon. I talked to him about his running and it turns out that he did a lot more than a marathon. He was doing two a year for several years and I think he said that he did the Detroit marathon eight times. He has also run in Cleveland and Pittsburgh at least twice. Like me, he’s not fast, but a P.R. of about 3:30 is not slow either. He’s now approaching 60 and still excited about his running.

We talked about the potential to do an event together and I’m all for it. He’s recovering from an injury now though — if he wasn’t, I would have invited him to do the half-marathon race that happens the same time as the Flying Pig marathon in Cincinnati. Or if he moves to Florida at some point, we may have to join up for the Orlando marathon. I wonder if that would be interesting for my other potential pack-mates who have kids since the Orlando marathon is pretty integrated with Disney World.
I’ve been hearing a bit about Buster Martin, pill a 101-year-old man who is planning to run the London Marathon. I think he’s setting a great example and illustrating the benefits of staying healthy throughout an entire lifetime (he used to be an Army Trainer back in the day). Best wishes Buster!

ABC News Report about Buster
The title of this post refers back to a question that we asked ourselves in podcast #2. Do I love running? Have I always loved running? The answers are yes and no respectively. The short version is that at times, web I got back into running because I wanted to lose some weight and get into shape. Running used to be a means to an end — and if I could get the same result from sitting on the couch and eating cupcakes, gynecologist I would have opted for the cupcake route. When you’re not in shape, this web running is awkward, painful, and feels a little like having a heart attack, especially if hills are involved. At least that’s how it is for me when I haven’t been running for an extended period.

And actually, I have turned to swimming and backpacking over the years as a fitness/stress activity. Both have limitations though. I love the gliding/flying feeling of swimming, but it kills my skin in the winter and the pool where I would swim has very limited hours. Backpacking is great, but it requires long stretches of time to actually get on a trail and let things go. Some of my best decisions have been made during long, quiet backpacking trips.

So while swimming and hiking are fun from the start, running took some time to really grow on me. I love it now, but it took time to build up my confidence, running identity, and a healthy endorphin addiction.
I’m a big fan of Shaun of the Dead, physiotherapy so when I started seeing the trailers for Run Fatboy Run staring Simon Pegg, I got pretty excited. He’s playing an out of shape guy who plans to run a marathon to prove his commitment to a woman that he used to be engaged to. Or something like that — it doesn’t really matter. I’ll see it when it comes out.


Jeff and I had a rough week because of “dead legs”. We explain what we mean and also talk about the importance of proper hydration, rx finding time to exercise (even during stressful times), adiposity and Jeff’s comments on dealing with stinky running gear. We also talk a little about stretching (any yoga-runner bi-athletes out there?) and Run Fatboy Run.
Potato cake dish from Herwig’s restaurant.
Jeff and I have gotten together and selected our next marathon. It looks like we’ll be doing the Flying Pig Marathon on May 4th, global burden of disease 2008 in Cincinnati, therapist Ohio. It should fit our criteria: not too hot, sildenafil not too far, Spring marathon, big event. In addition to the marathon, they also have a 5K, 10K, and half-marathon, so if you’ve been thinking of running a race, you’re welcome to join us!

I ran across a news story this morning about air-powered cars that should get the equivalent of 100 MPG and run for 1000 miles on one fill-up of fuel and compressed air.  The cars should hit the US market in 2009 or 2010 and cost about $17, abortion 800.  At speeds less than 35 MPH, the car emits only filtered air.  Above that, it uses air and a small amount of fuel (used to heat the air).  Max speed is supposed to be 90-100 MPH. 

Um — yes on all accounts.  Low emissions, cost efficient, and in the same range or cheaper than a hybrid car.  Now, as long as this actually shows up in the marketplace and it’s full of first-generation bugs, I’m sold.

Powered by ScribeFire.

I have been thinking about creating a marathon podcast (i.e. a podcast about my running). I don’t have any grand plans for it, food but I like podcasting and I like the thought that some random person may listen to what we have to say and then go for a run. I say “we” because I’m thinking about podcasting with Jeff (my running partner). I like the multi-person format. As for content, contagion I thought we could talk about training, our runs, health, injuries, shoes (and other technical gear), books, articles, funny stories, gadgets, etc… I’d also like to have other runners on the show and talk to them about their runs, why they run, and how it has impacted their lives. Oh…and I just thought of this…I happen to know someone who has been trying out for the Olympics and a few grad students in the Biobehavioral Health program at Penn State who would have interesting perspectives.

In any case, in my thought process about this, I checked Google and iTunes to see what running podcasts were already out there. This episode looks particularly interesting, first because it’s one of only a few podcasts that have been made while someone is running a marathon, but second because it was made during the 2007 Philadelphia Marathon, which was my first.

Link to iTunes:
Phedippidations: The Philly Marathon
I told Jeff about my idea for a marathon podcast before our 16-mile run today and he liked the idea, ambulance so after the run, we sat down and made a recording. In this first episode of Running with the Pack, Jeff and I talk a little about ourselves, the reasons we run marathons, the people who have inspired us, a few stories about the Philadelphia Marathon, and what we’re doing to prepare for the Flying Pig Marathon in May.

Updates to the information in the podcast:

  • The name of the book is the Non-Runner’s Marathon Trainer (see right sidebar, I have it listed)
  • The Wired Magazine article was about ultramarathon runner Dean Karnazes and it was the January 2007 issue. I have his book in the sidebar as well.

This week, for sale we discussed running rituals; runners who hate running; Buster Martin, who may become the worlds oldest marathon runner; backup marathons; and Brandon’s Marathon Podcast at brandonsmarathon.com. All of this after a 12-mile run that should have been a 16-mile run. Read more at parkedthoughts.com

This weekend, salve I made a quick trip to Johnstown and was able to see a large group of relatives from my dad’s side of the family. Among them was Dave, artificial who is one of the cousins that I mentioned in the first podcast who has completed a marathon. I talked to him about his running and it turns out that he did a lot more than a marathon. He was doing two a year for several years and I think he said that he did the Detroit marathon eight times. He has also run in Cleveland and Pittsburgh at least twice. Like me, he’s not fast, but a P.R. of about 3:30 is not slow either. He’s now approaching 60 and still excited about his running.

We talked about the potential to do an event together and I’m all for it. He’s recovering from an injury now though — if he wasn’t, I would have invited him to do the half-marathon race that happens the same time as the Flying Pig marathon in Cincinnati. Or if he moves to Florida at some point, we may have to join up for the Orlando marathon. I wonder if that would be interesting for my other potential pack-mates who have kids since the Orlando marathon is pretty integrated with Disney World.
I’ve been hearing a bit about Buster Martin, pill a 101-year-old man who is planning to run the London Marathon. I think he’s setting a great example and illustrating the benefits of staying healthy throughout an entire lifetime (he used to be an Army Trainer back in the day). Best wishes Buster!

ABC News Report about Buster
The title of this post refers back to a question that we asked ourselves in podcast #2. Do I love running? Have I always loved running? The answers are yes and no respectively. The short version is that at times, web I got back into running because I wanted to lose some weight and get into shape. Running used to be a means to an end — and if I could get the same result from sitting on the couch and eating cupcakes, gynecologist I would have opted for the cupcake route. When you’re not in shape, this web running is awkward, painful, and feels a little like having a heart attack, especially if hills are involved. At least that’s how it is for me when I haven’t been running for an extended period.

And actually, I have turned to swimming and backpacking over the years as a fitness/stress activity. Both have limitations though. I love the gliding/flying feeling of swimming, but it kills my skin in the winter and the pool where I would swim has very limited hours. Backpacking is great, but it requires long stretches of time to actually get on a trail and let things go. Some of my best decisions have been made during long, quiet backpacking trips.

So while swimming and hiking are fun from the start, running took some time to really grow on me. I love it now, but it took time to build up my confidence, running identity, and a healthy endorphin addiction.
I’m a big fan of Shaun of the Dead, physiotherapy so when I started seeing the trailers for Run Fatboy Run staring Simon Pegg, I got pretty excited. He’s playing an out of shape guy who plans to run a marathon to prove his commitment to a woman that he used to be engaged to. Or something like that — it doesn’t really matter. I’ll see it when it comes out.


Jeff and I had a rough week because of “dead legs”. We explain what we mean and also talk about the importance of proper hydration, rx finding time to exercise (even during stressful times), adiposity and Jeff’s comments on dealing with stinky running gear. We also talk a little about stretching (any yoga-runner bi-athletes out there?) and Run Fatboy Run.
After having “dead legs” on our run yesterday, resuscitation Jeff and I both ran today and had “fresh legs”, meaning that we had a spring in our step and running came easily. I ran four miles today in just under 32 minutes (without pushing it). I can’t keep up that pace for 26.2 miles, but I definitely feel faster than in the Fall. I’m not certain that I have the same endurance though. This coming weekend should give me a better idea when we do one of our last long runs before tapering off for the Flying Pig.

Ideally, I would like to do:

  • 18 miles on March 30
  • 10 miles on April 6 (recovery week)
  • 20 miles on April 13
  • 12 miles on April 20 (taper week 1)
  • 8 miles on April 27 (taper week 2)
  • Flying Pig Marathon on May 4

The weather this weekend looks like some rain on Saturday and partly cloudy on Sunday (to the extent that you can trust the 10-day weather forecast this far out). So a nice slow outside run on Sunday around 3:00 sounds like a good plan. I’ll be sure to drink enough before lacing up this time.
Potato cake dish from Herwig’s restaurant.
Jeff and I have gotten together and selected our next marathon. It looks like we’ll be doing the Flying Pig Marathon on May 4th, global burden of disease 2008 in Cincinnati, therapist Ohio. It should fit our criteria: not too hot, sildenafil not too far, Spring marathon, big event. In addition to the marathon, they also have a 5K, 10K, and half-marathon, so if you’ve been thinking of running a race, you’re welcome to join us!

I ran across a news story this morning about air-powered cars that should get the equivalent of 100 MPG and run for 1000 miles on one fill-up of fuel and compressed air.  The cars should hit the US market in 2009 or 2010 and cost about $17, abortion 800.  At speeds less than 35 MPH, the car emits only filtered air.  Above that, it uses air and a small amount of fuel (used to heat the air).  Max speed is supposed to be 90-100 MPH. 

Um — yes on all accounts.  Low emissions, cost efficient, and in the same range or cheaper than a hybrid car.  Now, as long as this actually shows up in the marketplace and it’s full of first-generation bugs, I’m sold.

Powered by ScribeFire.

I have been thinking about creating a marathon podcast (i.e. a podcast about my running). I don’t have any grand plans for it, food but I like podcasting and I like the thought that some random person may listen to what we have to say and then go for a run. I say “we” because I’m thinking about podcasting with Jeff (my running partner). I like the multi-person format. As for content, contagion I thought we could talk about training, our runs, health, injuries, shoes (and other technical gear), books, articles, funny stories, gadgets, etc… I’d also like to have other runners on the show and talk to them about their runs, why they run, and how it has impacted their lives. Oh…and I just thought of this…I happen to know someone who has been trying out for the Olympics and a few grad students in the Biobehavioral Health program at Penn State who would have interesting perspectives.

In any case, in my thought process about this, I checked Google and iTunes to see what running podcasts were already out there. This episode looks particularly interesting, first because it’s one of only a few podcasts that have been made while someone is running a marathon, but second because it was made during the 2007 Philadelphia Marathon, which was my first.

Link to iTunes:
Phedippidations: The Philly Marathon
I told Jeff about my idea for a marathon podcast before our 16-mile run today and he liked the idea, ambulance so after the run, we sat down and made a recording. In this first episode of Running with the Pack, Jeff and I talk a little about ourselves, the reasons we run marathons, the people who have inspired us, a few stories about the Philadelphia Marathon, and what we’re doing to prepare for the Flying Pig Marathon in May.

Updates to the information in the podcast:

  • The name of the book is the Non-Runner’s Marathon Trainer (see right sidebar, I have it listed)
  • The Wired Magazine article was about ultramarathon runner Dean Karnazes and it was the January 2007 issue. I have his book in the sidebar as well.

This week, for sale we discussed running rituals; runners who hate running; Buster Martin, who may become the worlds oldest marathon runner; backup marathons; and Brandon’s Marathon Podcast at brandonsmarathon.com. All of this after a 12-mile run that should have been a 16-mile run. Read more at parkedthoughts.com

This weekend, salve I made a quick trip to Johnstown and was able to see a large group of relatives from my dad’s side of the family. Among them was Dave, artificial who is one of the cousins that I mentioned in the first podcast who has completed a marathon. I talked to him about his running and it turns out that he did a lot more than a marathon. He was doing two a year for several years and I think he said that he did the Detroit marathon eight times. He has also run in Cleveland and Pittsburgh at least twice. Like me, he’s not fast, but a P.R. of about 3:30 is not slow either. He’s now approaching 60 and still excited about his running.

We talked about the potential to do an event together and I’m all for it. He’s recovering from an injury now though — if he wasn’t, I would have invited him to do the half-marathon race that happens the same time as the Flying Pig marathon in Cincinnati. Or if he moves to Florida at some point, we may have to join up for the Orlando marathon. I wonder if that would be interesting for my other potential pack-mates who have kids since the Orlando marathon is pretty integrated with Disney World.
I’ve been hearing a bit about Buster Martin, pill a 101-year-old man who is planning to run the London Marathon. I think he’s setting a great example and illustrating the benefits of staying healthy throughout an entire lifetime (he used to be an Army Trainer back in the day). Best wishes Buster!

ABC News Report about Buster
The title of this post refers back to a question that we asked ourselves in podcast #2. Do I love running? Have I always loved running? The answers are yes and no respectively. The short version is that at times, web I got back into running because I wanted to lose some weight and get into shape. Running used to be a means to an end — and if I could get the same result from sitting on the couch and eating cupcakes, gynecologist I would have opted for the cupcake route. When you’re not in shape, this web running is awkward, painful, and feels a little like having a heart attack, especially if hills are involved. At least that’s how it is for me when I haven’t been running for an extended period.

And actually, I have turned to swimming and backpacking over the years as a fitness/stress activity. Both have limitations though. I love the gliding/flying feeling of swimming, but it kills my skin in the winter and the pool where I would swim has very limited hours. Backpacking is great, but it requires long stretches of time to actually get on a trail and let things go. Some of my best decisions have been made during long, quiet backpacking trips.

So while swimming and hiking are fun from the start, running took some time to really grow on me. I love it now, but it took time to build up my confidence, running identity, and a healthy endorphin addiction.
I’m a big fan of Shaun of the Dead, physiotherapy so when I started seeing the trailers for Run Fatboy Run staring Simon Pegg, I got pretty excited. He’s playing an out of shape guy who plans to run a marathon to prove his commitment to a woman that he used to be engaged to. Or something like that — it doesn’t really matter. I’ll see it when it comes out.


Jeff and I had a rough week because of “dead legs”. We explain what we mean and also talk about the importance of proper hydration, rx finding time to exercise (even during stressful times), adiposity and Jeff’s comments on dealing with stinky running gear. We also talk a little about stretching (any yoga-runner bi-athletes out there?) and Run Fatboy Run.
After having “dead legs” on our run yesterday, resuscitation Jeff and I both ran today and had “fresh legs”, meaning that we had a spring in our step and running came easily. I ran four miles today in just under 32 minutes (without pushing it). I can’t keep up that pace for 26.2 miles, but I definitely feel faster than in the Fall. I’m not certain that I have the same endurance though. This coming weekend should give me a better idea when we do one of our last long runs before tapering off for the Flying Pig.

Ideally, I would like to do:

  • 18 miles on March 30
  • 10 miles on April 6 (recovery week)
  • 20 miles on April 13
  • 12 miles on April 20 (taper week 1)
  • 8 miles on April 27 (taper week 2)
  • Flying Pig Marathon on May 4

The weather this weekend looks like some rain on Saturday and partly cloudy on Sunday (to the extent that you can trust the 10-day weather forecast this far out). So a nice slow outside run on Sunday around 3:00 sounds like a good plan. I’ll be sure to drink enough before lacing up this time.
After having “dead legs” on our run yesterday, resuscitation Jeff and I both ran today and had “fresh legs”, meaning that we had a spring in our step and running came easily. I ran four miles today in just under 32 minutes (without pushing it). I can’t keep up that pace for 26.2 miles, but I definitely feel faster than in the Fall. I’m not certain that I have the same endurance though. This coming weekend should give me a better idea when we do one of our last long runs before tapering off for the Flying Pig.

Ideally, I would like to do:

  • 18 miles on March 30
  • 10 miles on April 6 (recovery week)
  • 20 miles on April 13
  • 12 miles on April 20 (taper week 1)
  • 8 miles on April 27 (taper week 2)
  • Flying Pig Marathon on May 4

The weather this weekend looks like some rain on Saturday and partly cloudy on Sunday (to the extent that you can trust the 10-day weather forecast this far out). So a nice slow outside run on Sunday around 3:00 sounds like a good plan. I’ll be sure to drink enough before lacing up this time.
This week, ambulance
we talk about running after a big event, urologist
Sports Beans and Cliff Shots, whether to wear tights or not while running, and our progress toward running the Flying Pig Marathon on May 4th.
Potato cake dish from Herwig’s restaurant.
Jeff and I have gotten together and selected our next marathon. It looks like we’ll be doing the Flying Pig Marathon on May 4th, global burden of disease 2008 in Cincinnati, therapist Ohio. It should fit our criteria: not too hot, sildenafil not too far, Spring marathon, big event. In addition to the marathon, they also have a 5K, 10K, and half-marathon, so if you’ve been thinking of running a race, you’re welcome to join us!

I ran across a news story this morning about air-powered cars that should get the equivalent of 100 MPG and run for 1000 miles on one fill-up of fuel and compressed air.  The cars should hit the US market in 2009 or 2010 and cost about $17, abortion 800.  At speeds less than 35 MPH, the car emits only filtered air.  Above that, it uses air and a small amount of fuel (used to heat the air).  Max speed is supposed to be 90-100 MPH. 

Um — yes on all accounts.  Low emissions, cost efficient, and in the same range or cheaper than a hybrid car.  Now, as long as this actually shows up in the marketplace and it’s full of first-generation bugs, I’m sold.

Powered by ScribeFire.

I have been thinking about creating a marathon podcast (i.e. a podcast about my running). I don’t have any grand plans for it, food but I like podcasting and I like the thought that some random person may listen to what we have to say and then go for a run. I say “we” because I’m thinking about podcasting with Jeff (my running partner). I like the multi-person format. As for content, contagion I thought we could talk about training, our runs, health, injuries, shoes (and other technical gear), books, articles, funny stories, gadgets, etc… I’d also like to have other runners on the show and talk to them about their runs, why they run, and how it has impacted their lives. Oh…and I just thought of this…I happen to know someone who has been trying out for the Olympics and a few grad students in the Biobehavioral Health program at Penn State who would have interesting perspectives.

In any case, in my thought process about this, I checked Google and iTunes to see what running podcasts were already out there. This episode looks particularly interesting, first because it’s one of only a few podcasts that have been made while someone is running a marathon, but second because it was made during the 2007 Philadelphia Marathon, which was my first.

Link to iTunes:
Phedippidations: The Philly Marathon
I told Jeff about my idea for a marathon podcast before our 16-mile run today and he liked the idea, ambulance so after the run, we sat down and made a recording. In this first episode of Running with the Pack, Jeff and I talk a little about ourselves, the reasons we run marathons, the people who have inspired us, a few stories about the Philadelphia Marathon, and what we’re doing to prepare for the Flying Pig Marathon in May.

Updates to the information in the podcast:

  • The name of the book is the Non-Runner’s Marathon Trainer (see right sidebar, I have it listed)
  • The Wired Magazine article was about ultramarathon runner Dean Karnazes and it was the January 2007 issue. I have his book in the sidebar as well.

This week, for sale we discussed running rituals; runners who hate running; Buster Martin, who may become the worlds oldest marathon runner; backup marathons; and Brandon’s Marathon Podcast at brandonsmarathon.com. All of this after a 12-mile run that should have been a 16-mile run. Read more at parkedthoughts.com

This weekend, salve I made a quick trip to Johnstown and was able to see a large group of relatives from my dad’s side of the family. Among them was Dave, artificial who is one of the cousins that I mentioned in the first podcast who has completed a marathon. I talked to him about his running and it turns out that he did a lot more than a marathon. He was doing two a year for several years and I think he said that he did the Detroit marathon eight times. He has also run in Cleveland and Pittsburgh at least twice. Like me, he’s not fast, but a P.R. of about 3:30 is not slow either. He’s now approaching 60 and still excited about his running.

We talked about the potential to do an event together and I’m all for it. He’s recovering from an injury now though — if he wasn’t, I would have invited him to do the half-marathon race that happens the same time as the Flying Pig marathon in Cincinnati. Or if he moves to Florida at some point, we may have to join up for the Orlando marathon. I wonder if that would be interesting for my other potential pack-mates who have kids since the Orlando marathon is pretty integrated with Disney World.
I’ve been hearing a bit about Buster Martin, pill a 101-year-old man who is planning to run the London Marathon. I think he’s setting a great example and illustrating the benefits of staying healthy throughout an entire lifetime (he used to be an Army Trainer back in the day). Best wishes Buster!

ABC News Report about Buster
The title of this post refers back to a question that we asked ourselves in podcast #2. Do I love running? Have I always loved running? The answers are yes and no respectively. The short version is that at times, web I got back into running because I wanted to lose some weight and get into shape. Running used to be a means to an end — and if I could get the same result from sitting on the couch and eating cupcakes, gynecologist I would have opted for the cupcake route. When you’re not in shape, this web running is awkward, painful, and feels a little like having a heart attack, especially if hills are involved. At least that’s how it is for me when I haven’t been running for an extended period.

And actually, I have turned to swimming and backpacking over the years as a fitness/stress activity. Both have limitations though. I love the gliding/flying feeling of swimming, but it kills my skin in the winter and the pool where I would swim has very limited hours. Backpacking is great, but it requires long stretches of time to actually get on a trail and let things go. Some of my best decisions have been made during long, quiet backpacking trips.

So while swimming and hiking are fun from the start, running took some time to really grow on me. I love it now, but it took time to build up my confidence, running identity, and a healthy endorphin addiction.
I’m a big fan of Shaun of the Dead, physiotherapy so when I started seeing the trailers for Run Fatboy Run staring Simon Pegg, I got pretty excited. He’s playing an out of shape guy who plans to run a marathon to prove his commitment to a woman that he used to be engaged to. Or something like that — it doesn’t really matter. I’ll see it when it comes out.


Jeff and I had a rough week because of “dead legs”. We explain what we mean and also talk about the importance of proper hydration, rx finding time to exercise (even during stressful times), adiposity and Jeff’s comments on dealing with stinky running gear. We also talk a little about stretching (any yoga-runner bi-athletes out there?) and Run Fatboy Run.
After having “dead legs” on our run yesterday, resuscitation Jeff and I both ran today and had “fresh legs”, meaning that we had a spring in our step and running came easily. I ran four miles today in just under 32 minutes (without pushing it). I can’t keep up that pace for 26.2 miles, but I definitely feel faster than in the Fall. I’m not certain that I have the same endurance though. This coming weekend should give me a better idea when we do one of our last long runs before tapering off for the Flying Pig.

Ideally, I would like to do:

  • 18 miles on March 30
  • 10 miles on April 6 (recovery week)
  • 20 miles on April 13
  • 12 miles on April 20 (taper week 1)
  • 8 miles on April 27 (taper week 2)
  • Flying Pig Marathon on May 4

The weather this weekend looks like some rain on Saturday and partly cloudy on Sunday (to the extent that you can trust the 10-day weather forecast this far out). So a nice slow outside run on Sunday around 3:00 sounds like a good plan. I’ll be sure to drink enough before lacing up this time.
After having “dead legs” on our run yesterday, resuscitation Jeff and I both ran today and had “fresh legs”, meaning that we had a spring in our step and running came easily. I ran four miles today in just under 32 minutes (without pushing it). I can’t keep up that pace for 26.2 miles, but I definitely feel faster than in the Fall. I’m not certain that I have the same endurance though. This coming weekend should give me a better idea when we do one of our last long runs before tapering off for the Flying Pig.

Ideally, I would like to do:

  • 18 miles on March 30
  • 10 miles on April 6 (recovery week)
  • 20 miles on April 13
  • 12 miles on April 20 (taper week 1)
  • 8 miles on April 27 (taper week 2)
  • Flying Pig Marathon on May 4

The weather this weekend looks like some rain on Saturday and partly cloudy on Sunday (to the extent that you can trust the 10-day weather forecast this far out). So a nice slow outside run on Sunday around 3:00 sounds like a good plan. I’ll be sure to drink enough before lacing up this time.
This week, ambulance
we talk about running after a big event, urologist
Sports Beans and Cliff Shots, whether to wear tights or not while running, and our progress toward running the Flying Pig Marathon on May 4th.
I was thinking about my pace today and what I could expect during the Flying Pig, plague so I did a search for a pace calculator. Most pace calculators just ask for a time per mile and then multiply that by 26.2, doctor which is fine if you always run at the same pace, but the fact is people tend to slow down the longer they run. In any case, I just found a pace calculator on McMillanrunning.com that takes the slowing effect into account AND calculates a projected time for a wide variety of distances (from 100 meters to a marathon). To test it, I typed in what I would estimate for a 30K run (close to my latest 18-miler) and looked at what it generated. According to the calculations, I should be able to run a 5K in about 22:54 and a marathon in 3:43:16. Based on the times that I’ve been getting while training, those seem very accurate.

In any case, I’m mostly posting the link here so I can find it again later, but I thought others would like to try it out as well. I’m interested to hearing your opinions about its estimates.
Potato cake dish from Herwig’s restaurant.
Jeff and I have gotten together and selected our next marathon. It looks like we’ll be doing the Flying Pig Marathon on May 4th, global burden of disease 2008 in Cincinnati, therapist Ohio. It should fit our criteria: not too hot, sildenafil not too far, Spring marathon, big event. In addition to the marathon, they also have a 5K, 10K, and half-marathon, so if you’ve been thinking of running a race, you’re welcome to join us!

I ran across a news story this morning about air-powered cars that should get the equivalent of 100 MPG and run for 1000 miles on one fill-up of fuel and compressed air.  The cars should hit the US market in 2009 or 2010 and cost about $17, abortion 800.  At speeds less than 35 MPH, the car emits only filtered air.  Above that, it uses air and a small amount of fuel (used to heat the air).  Max speed is supposed to be 90-100 MPH. 

Um — yes on all accounts.  Low emissions, cost efficient, and in the same range or cheaper than a hybrid car.  Now, as long as this actually shows up in the marketplace and it’s full of first-generation bugs, I’m sold.

Powered by ScribeFire.

I have been thinking about creating a marathon podcast (i.e. a podcast about my running). I don’t have any grand plans for it, food but I like podcasting and I like the thought that some random person may listen to what we have to say and then go for a run. I say “we” because I’m thinking about podcasting with Jeff (my running partner). I like the multi-person format. As for content, contagion I thought we could talk about training, our runs, health, injuries, shoes (and other technical gear), books, articles, funny stories, gadgets, etc… I’d also like to have other runners on the show and talk to them about their runs, why they run, and how it has impacted their lives. Oh…and I just thought of this…I happen to know someone who has been trying out for the Olympics and a few grad students in the Biobehavioral Health program at Penn State who would have interesting perspectives.

In any case, in my thought process about this, I checked Google and iTunes to see what running podcasts were already out there. This episode looks particularly interesting, first because it’s one of only a few podcasts that have been made while someone is running a marathon, but second because it was made during the 2007 Philadelphia Marathon, which was my first.

Link to iTunes:
Phedippidations: The Philly Marathon
I told Jeff about my idea for a marathon podcast before our 16-mile run today and he liked the idea, ambulance so after the run, we sat down and made a recording. In this first episode of Running with the Pack, Jeff and I talk a little about ourselves, the reasons we run marathons, the people who have inspired us, a few stories about the Philadelphia Marathon, and what we’re doing to prepare for the Flying Pig Marathon in May.

Updates to the information in the podcast:

  • The name of the book is the Non-Runner’s Marathon Trainer (see right sidebar, I have it listed)
  • The Wired Magazine article was about ultramarathon runner Dean Karnazes and it was the January 2007 issue. I have his book in the sidebar as well.

This week, for sale we discussed running rituals; runners who hate running; Buster Martin, who may become the worlds oldest marathon runner; backup marathons; and Brandon’s Marathon Podcast at brandonsmarathon.com. All of this after a 12-mile run that should have been a 16-mile run. Read more at parkedthoughts.com

This weekend, salve I made a quick trip to Johnstown and was able to see a large group of relatives from my dad’s side of the family. Among them was Dave, artificial who is one of the cousins that I mentioned in the first podcast who has completed a marathon. I talked to him about his running and it turns out that he did a lot more than a marathon. He was doing two a year for several years and I think he said that he did the Detroit marathon eight times. He has also run in Cleveland and Pittsburgh at least twice. Like me, he’s not fast, but a P.R. of about 3:30 is not slow either. He’s now approaching 60 and still excited about his running.

We talked about the potential to do an event together and I’m all for it. He’s recovering from an injury now though — if he wasn’t, I would have invited him to do the half-marathon race that happens the same time as the Flying Pig marathon in Cincinnati. Or if he moves to Florida at some point, we may have to join up for the Orlando marathon. I wonder if that would be interesting for my other potential pack-mates who have kids since the Orlando marathon is pretty integrated with Disney World.
I’ve been hearing a bit about Buster Martin, pill a 101-year-old man who is planning to run the London Marathon. I think he’s setting a great example and illustrating the benefits of staying healthy throughout an entire lifetime (he used to be an Army Trainer back in the day). Best wishes Buster!

ABC News Report about Buster
The title of this post refers back to a question that we asked ourselves in podcast #2. Do I love running? Have I always loved running? The answers are yes and no respectively. The short version is that at times, web I got back into running because I wanted to lose some weight and get into shape. Running used to be a means to an end — and if I could get the same result from sitting on the couch and eating cupcakes, gynecologist I would have opted for the cupcake route. When you’re not in shape, this web running is awkward, painful, and feels a little like having a heart attack, especially if hills are involved. At least that’s how it is for me when I haven’t been running for an extended period.

And actually, I have turned to swimming and backpacking over the years as a fitness/stress activity. Both have limitations though. I love the gliding/flying feeling of swimming, but it kills my skin in the winter and the pool where I would swim has very limited hours. Backpacking is great, but it requires long stretches of time to actually get on a trail and let things go. Some of my best decisions have been made during long, quiet backpacking trips.

So while swimming and hiking are fun from the start, running took some time to really grow on me. I love it now, but it took time to build up my confidence, running identity, and a healthy endorphin addiction.
I’m a big fan of Shaun of the Dead, physiotherapy so when I started seeing the trailers for Run Fatboy Run staring Simon Pegg, I got pretty excited. He’s playing an out of shape guy who plans to run a marathon to prove his commitment to a woman that he used to be engaged to. Or something like that — it doesn’t really matter. I’ll see it when it comes out.


Jeff and I had a rough week because of “dead legs”. We explain what we mean and also talk about the importance of proper hydration, rx finding time to exercise (even during stressful times), adiposity and Jeff’s comments on dealing with stinky running gear. We also talk a little about stretching (any yoga-runner bi-athletes out there?) and Run Fatboy Run.
After having “dead legs” on our run yesterday, resuscitation Jeff and I both ran today and had “fresh legs”, meaning that we had a spring in our step and running came easily. I ran four miles today in just under 32 minutes (without pushing it). I can’t keep up that pace for 26.2 miles, but I definitely feel faster than in the Fall. I’m not certain that I have the same endurance though. This coming weekend should give me a better idea when we do one of our last long runs before tapering off for the Flying Pig.

Ideally, I would like to do:

  • 18 miles on March 30
  • 10 miles on April 6 (recovery week)
  • 20 miles on April 13
  • 12 miles on April 20 (taper week 1)
  • 8 miles on April 27 (taper week 2)
  • Flying Pig Marathon on May 4

The weather this weekend looks like some rain on Saturday and partly cloudy on Sunday (to the extent that you can trust the 10-day weather forecast this far out). So a nice slow outside run on Sunday around 3:00 sounds like a good plan. I’ll be sure to drink enough before lacing up this time.
After having “dead legs” on our run yesterday, resuscitation Jeff and I both ran today and had “fresh legs”, meaning that we had a spring in our step and running came easily. I ran four miles today in just under 32 minutes (without pushing it). I can’t keep up that pace for 26.2 miles, but I definitely feel faster than in the Fall. I’m not certain that I have the same endurance though. This coming weekend should give me a better idea when we do one of our last long runs before tapering off for the Flying Pig.

Ideally, I would like to do:

  • 18 miles on March 30
  • 10 miles on April 6 (recovery week)
  • 20 miles on April 13
  • 12 miles on April 20 (taper week 1)
  • 8 miles on April 27 (taper week 2)
  • Flying Pig Marathon on May 4

The weather this weekend looks like some rain on Saturday and partly cloudy on Sunday (to the extent that you can trust the 10-day weather forecast this far out). So a nice slow outside run on Sunday around 3:00 sounds like a good plan. I’ll be sure to drink enough before lacing up this time.
This week, ambulance
we talk about running after a big event, urologist
Sports Beans and Cliff Shots, whether to wear tights or not while running, and our progress toward running the Flying Pig Marathon on May 4th.
I was thinking about my pace today and what I could expect during the Flying Pig, plague so I did a search for a pace calculator. Most pace calculators just ask for a time per mile and then multiply that by 26.2, doctor which is fine if you always run at the same pace, but the fact is people tend to slow down the longer they run. In any case, I just found a pace calculator on McMillanrunning.com that takes the slowing effect into account AND calculates a projected time for a wide variety of distances (from 100 meters to a marathon). To test it, I typed in what I would estimate for a 30K run (close to my latest 18-miler) and looked at what it generated. According to the calculations, I should be able to run a 5K in about 22:54 and a marathon in 3:43:16. Based on the times that I’ve been getting while training, those seem very accurate.

In any case, I’m mostly posting the link here so I can find it again later, but I thought others would like to try it out as well. I’m interested to hearing your opinions about its estimates.
I was thinking about my pace today and what I could expect during the Flying Pig, there so I did a search for a pace calculator. Most pace calculators just ask for a time per mile and then multiply that by 26.2, which is fine if you always run at the same pace, but the fact is people tend to slow down the longer they run. In any case, I just found a pace calculator on McMillanrunning.com that takes the slowing effect into account AND calculates a projected time for a wide variety of distances (from 100 meters to a marathon). To test it, I typed in what I would estimate for a 30K run (close to my latest 18-miler) and looked at what it generated. According to the calculations, I should be able to run a 5K in about 22:54 and a marathon in 3:43:16. Based on the times that I’ve been getting while training, those seem very accurate.

In any case, I’m mostly posting the link here so I can find it again later, but I thought others would like to try it out as well. I’m interested to hearing your opinions about its estimates.
Potato cake dish from Herwig’s restaurant.
Jeff and I have gotten together and selected our next marathon. It looks like we’ll be doing the Flying Pig Marathon on May 4th, global burden of disease 2008 in Cincinnati, therapist Ohio. It should fit our criteria: not too hot, sildenafil not too far, Spring marathon, big event. In addition to the marathon, they also have a 5K, 10K, and half-marathon, so if you’ve been thinking of running a race, you’re welcome to join us!

I ran across a news story this morning about air-powered cars that should get the equivalent of 100 MPG and run for 1000 miles on one fill-up of fuel and compressed air.  The cars should hit the US market in 2009 or 2010 and cost about $17, abortion 800.  At speeds less than 35 MPH, the car emits only filtered air.  Above that, it uses air and a small amount of fuel (used to heat the air).  Max speed is supposed to be 90-100 MPH. 

Um — yes on all accounts.  Low emissions, cost efficient, and in the same range or cheaper than a hybrid car.  Now, as long as this actually shows up in the marketplace and it’s full of first-generation bugs, I’m sold.

Powered by ScribeFire.

I have been thinking about creating a marathon podcast (i.e. a podcast about my running). I don’t have any grand plans for it, food but I like podcasting and I like the thought that some random person may listen to what we have to say and then go for a run. I say “we” because I’m thinking about podcasting with Jeff (my running partner). I like the multi-person format. As for content, contagion I thought we could talk about training, our runs, health, injuries, shoes (and other technical gear), books, articles, funny stories, gadgets, etc… I’d also like to have other runners on the show and talk to them about their runs, why they run, and how it has impacted their lives. Oh…and I just thought of this…I happen to know someone who has been trying out for the Olympics and a few grad students in the Biobehavioral Health program at Penn State who would have interesting perspectives.

In any case, in my thought process about this, I checked Google and iTunes to see what running podcasts were already out there. This episode looks particularly interesting, first because it’s one of only a few podcasts that have been made while someone is running a marathon, but second because it was made during the 2007 Philadelphia Marathon, which was my first.

Link to iTunes:
Phedippidations: The Philly Marathon
I told Jeff about my idea for a marathon podcast before our 16-mile run today and he liked the idea, ambulance so after the run, we sat down and made a recording. In this first episode of Running with the Pack, Jeff and I talk a little about ourselves, the reasons we run marathons, the people who have inspired us, a few stories about the Philadelphia Marathon, and what we’re doing to prepare for the Flying Pig Marathon in May.

Updates to the information in the podcast:

  • The name of the book is the Non-Runner’s Marathon Trainer (see right sidebar, I have it listed)
  • The Wired Magazine article was about ultramarathon runner Dean Karnazes and it was the January 2007 issue. I have his book in the sidebar as well.

This week, for sale we discussed running rituals; runners who hate running; Buster Martin, who may become the worlds oldest marathon runner; backup marathons; and Brandon’s Marathon Podcast at brandonsmarathon.com. All of this after a 12-mile run that should have been a 16-mile run. Read more at parkedthoughts.com

This weekend, salve I made a quick trip to Johnstown and was able to see a large group of relatives from my dad’s side of the family. Among them was Dave, artificial who is one of the cousins that I mentioned in the first podcast who has completed a marathon. I talked to him about his running and it turns out that he did a lot more than a marathon. He was doing two a year for several years and I think he said that he did the Detroit marathon eight times. He has also run in Cleveland and Pittsburgh at least twice. Like me, he’s not fast, but a P.R. of about 3:30 is not slow either. He’s now approaching 60 and still excited about his running.

We talked about the potential to do an event together and I’m all for it. He’s recovering from an injury now though — if he wasn’t, I would have invited him to do the half-marathon race that happens the same time as the Flying Pig marathon in Cincinnati. Or if he moves to Florida at some point, we may have to join up for the Orlando marathon. I wonder if that would be interesting for my other potential pack-mates who have kids since the Orlando marathon is pretty integrated with Disney World.
I’ve been hearing a bit about Buster Martin, pill a 101-year-old man who is planning to run the London Marathon. I think he’s setting a great example and illustrating the benefits of staying healthy throughout an entire lifetime (he used to be an Army Trainer back in the day). Best wishes Buster!

ABC News Report about Buster
The title of this post refers back to a question that we asked ourselves in podcast #2. Do I love running? Have I always loved running? The answers are yes and no respectively. The short version is that at times, web I got back into running because I wanted to lose some weight and get into shape. Running used to be a means to an end — and if I could get the same result from sitting on the couch and eating cupcakes, gynecologist I would have opted for the cupcake route. When you’re not in shape, this web running is awkward, painful, and feels a little like having a heart attack, especially if hills are involved. At least that’s how it is for me when I haven’t been running for an extended period.

And actually, I have turned to swimming and backpacking over the years as a fitness/stress activity. Both have limitations though. I love the gliding/flying feeling of swimming, but it kills my skin in the winter and the pool where I would swim has very limited hours. Backpacking is great, but it requires long stretches of time to actually get on a trail and let things go. Some of my best decisions have been made during long, quiet backpacking trips.

So while swimming and hiking are fun from the start, running took some time to really grow on me. I love it now, but it took time to build up my confidence, running identity, and a healthy endorphin addiction.
I’m a big fan of Shaun of the Dead, physiotherapy so when I started seeing the trailers for Run Fatboy Run staring Simon Pegg, I got pretty excited. He’s playing an out of shape guy who plans to run a marathon to prove his commitment to a woman that he used to be engaged to. Or something like that — it doesn’t really matter. I’ll see it when it comes out.


Jeff and I had a rough week because of “dead legs”. We explain what we mean and also talk about the importance of proper hydration, rx finding time to exercise (even during stressful times), adiposity and Jeff’s comments on dealing with stinky running gear. We also talk a little about stretching (any yoga-runner bi-athletes out there?) and Run Fatboy Run.
After having “dead legs” on our run yesterday, resuscitation Jeff and I both ran today and had “fresh legs”, meaning that we had a spring in our step and running came easily. I ran four miles today in just under 32 minutes (without pushing it). I can’t keep up that pace for 26.2 miles, but I definitely feel faster than in the Fall. I’m not certain that I have the same endurance though. This coming weekend should give me a better idea when we do one of our last long runs before tapering off for the Flying Pig.

Ideally, I would like to do:

  • 18 miles on March 30
  • 10 miles on April 6 (recovery week)
  • 20 miles on April 13
  • 12 miles on April 20 (taper week 1)
  • 8 miles on April 27 (taper week 2)
  • Flying Pig Marathon on May 4

The weather this weekend looks like some rain on Saturday and partly cloudy on Sunday (to the extent that you can trust the 10-day weather forecast this far out). So a nice slow outside run on Sunday around 3:00 sounds like a good plan. I’ll be sure to drink enough before lacing up this time.
After having “dead legs” on our run yesterday, resuscitation Jeff and I both ran today and had “fresh legs”, meaning that we had a spring in our step and running came easily. I ran four miles today in just under 32 minutes (without pushing it). I can’t keep up that pace for 26.2 miles, but I definitely feel faster than in the Fall. I’m not certain that I have the same endurance though. This coming weekend should give me a better idea when we do one of our last long runs before tapering off for the Flying Pig.

Ideally, I would like to do:

  • 18 miles on March 30
  • 10 miles on April 6 (recovery week)
  • 20 miles on April 13
  • 12 miles on April 20 (taper week 1)
  • 8 miles on April 27 (taper week 2)
  • Flying Pig Marathon on May 4

The weather this weekend looks like some rain on Saturday and partly cloudy on Sunday (to the extent that you can trust the 10-day weather forecast this far out). So a nice slow outside run on Sunday around 3:00 sounds like a good plan. I’ll be sure to drink enough before lacing up this time.
This week, ambulance
we talk about running after a big event, urologist
Sports Beans and Cliff Shots, whether to wear tights or not while running, and our progress toward running the Flying Pig Marathon on May 4th.
I was thinking about my pace today and what I could expect during the Flying Pig, plague so I did a search for a pace calculator. Most pace calculators just ask for a time per mile and then multiply that by 26.2, doctor which is fine if you always run at the same pace, but the fact is people tend to slow down the longer they run. In any case, I just found a pace calculator on McMillanrunning.com that takes the slowing effect into account AND calculates a projected time for a wide variety of distances (from 100 meters to a marathon). To test it, I typed in what I would estimate for a 30K run (close to my latest 18-miler) and looked at what it generated. According to the calculations, I should be able to run a 5K in about 22:54 and a marathon in 3:43:16. Based on the times that I’ve been getting while training, those seem very accurate.

In any case, I’m mostly posting the link here so I can find it again later, but I thought others would like to try it out as well. I’m interested to hearing your opinions about its estimates.
I was thinking about my pace today and what I could expect during the Flying Pig, there so I did a search for a pace calculator. Most pace calculators just ask for a time per mile and then multiply that by 26.2, which is fine if you always run at the same pace, but the fact is people tend to slow down the longer they run. In any case, I just found a pace calculator on McMillanrunning.com that takes the slowing effect into account AND calculates a projected time for a wide variety of distances (from 100 meters to a marathon). To test it, I typed in what I would estimate for a 30K run (close to my latest 18-miler) and looked at what it generated. According to the calculations, I should be able to run a 5K in about 22:54 and a marathon in 3:43:16. Based on the times that I’ve been getting while training, those seem very accurate.

In any case, I’m mostly posting the link here so I can find it again later, but I thought others would like to try it out as well. I’m interested to hearing your opinions about its estimates.
I was thinking about my pace today and what I could expect during the Flying Pig, there so I did a search for a pace calculator. Most pace calculators just ask for a time per mile and then multiply that by 26.2, which is fine if you always run at the same pace, but the fact is people tend to slow down the longer they run. In any case, I just found a pace calculator on McMillanrunning.com that takes the slowing effect into account AND calculates a projected time for a wide variety of distances (from 100 meters to a marathon). To test it, I typed in what I would estimate for a 30K run (close to my latest 18-miler) and looked at what it generated. According to the calculations, I should be able to run a 5K in about 22:54 and a marathon in 3:43:16. Based on the times that I’ve been getting while training, those seem very accurate.

In any case, I’m mostly posting the link here so I can find it again later, but I thought others would like to try it out as well. I’m interested to hearing your opinions about its estimates.
This week, Hemorrhoids
I talk with Mike Westermeier, sanitary
a fellow runner and running blogger, dosage
about how he got started running, his goal of running 50 marathons in each of the 50 states, training for his first ultramarathon, the movie Spirit of the Marathon, and many other topics.

Thanks for being on the podcast Mike! Good luck next week. Let us know how it goes.

Posted in movies, podcasting, running | 2 Comments

Quick Thoughts on Run Fatboy Run

I received my Apple Watch on May 15th. So far, erectile I’m really liking it. Here are some thoughts.

Right choice.
As I mentioned in my previous post, remedy I bought the 38mm model with the black sports band along with Apple Care. It’s the least expensive model, cialis 40mg which I plan to replace in a couple of years when the technology advances sufficiently. The 38mm size looks perfect on my wrist, but your mileage may vary.

Great for fitness.
My watch friend is kind enough to remind me that sitting for more than an hour is a bad thing and that I should get up and move around. “Get your body moving” has been a common phrase I’ve used on my old running podcast, but now I have something to remind me. It also does a good job tracking my time exercising and roughly how many calories I’m burning through exercise. I feel good when I make my daily goals. In this sense, the Apple Watch is a great replacement for my FitBit, which I stopped wearing due to battery problems.

Good iPhone companion.
I knew this going in, but a week confirmed it. The Apple Watch is closely tied to an iPhone 5 or later. If you don’t have an iPhone or happen to leave it at home while going out for a run or to walk the dog, the Apple Watch will still show the date, time, and your fitness, but it won’t be able to do anything like send and receive messages, give map directions, or anything needing Siri. I haven’t tried this yet, but it looks like you can use Apple Pay without having your phone with you. Which is great if you can find a location where Apple Pay is accepted (again assuming you need something while out for a run or similar situation). This article does a nice job describing what can be done without your iPhone.

I want to buy more apps.
I feel a bit like I own a great new video game console before many of the anticipated titles have been released. Some of my apps came with a shrunk-down display which would work on my phone. Zillow, for example, will show me information about houses and condos nearby, but there isn’t much I can do to narrow down my search. I was hoping for an interesting game or two to download, but then I thought that games might not be a good idea for the Apple Watch since its battery life would be quickly drained by that kind of use. One week in, I’m not surprised that there isn’t more available. The initial iPhone only had the built-in applications with no app store at all. The iPad launched with apps, but many were pixelated versions of iPhone apps.

New interface.
It look me a couple of hours to get used to the new interface – the crown, the button, swiping in different directions, the hard press, etc… I was used to iPhone and iPad functions, so I was tempted try to zoom out by pinching in a tool like Apple Maps. Pinching doesn’t zoom you out. Double-tapping zooms you in, but you can’t get back out that way. The right way to do this is by using the crown to zoom in and out. That make sense once you think about it. The crown helps to keep your fingers from blocking the display. It’s just not what I went to first since there hasn’t been a crown on other Apple devices until now.

Surprised by quick adoption.
The day I received my Apple Watch, I went out to dinner with some family members who were in town. I left a little early to take the dog back to our apartment. On my way home, my watch began to ring. I hadn’t felt or heard my phone ringing in my pocket since I was walking and close to a road with traffic, so if it hadn’t been for the watch, I would have missed the call. I was able to answer the call on my watch and talk through it to the person on the other end. I’ve only taken a few other calls through my watch since then, but on many occasions I’ve received text messages and calendar reminders through a quick tap on the wrist. It has been very nice.

I’m still getting used to this new platform, but I’ve enjoyed it so far. If you want to see what the Apple Watch is like without the presence of the Apple hype machine, there are lots of reviews of Apple Watches showing up on YouTube. I found this one to be a nice overview that would be appropriate for someone who is thinking about getting one or expecting theirs to arrive shortly.


I received my Apple Watch on May 15th. So far, erectile I’m really liking it. Here are some thoughts.

Right choice.
As I mentioned in my previous post, remedy I bought the 38mm model with the black sports band along with Apple Care. It’s the least expensive model, cialis 40mg which I plan to replace in a couple of years when the technology advances sufficiently. The 38mm size looks perfect on my wrist, but your mileage may vary.

Great for fitness.
My watch friend is kind enough to remind me that sitting for more than an hour is a bad thing and that I should get up and move around. “Get your body moving” has been a common phrase I’ve used on my old running podcast, but now I have something to remind me. It also does a good job tracking my time exercising and roughly how many calories I’m burning through exercise. I feel good when I make my daily goals. In this sense, the Apple Watch is a great replacement for my FitBit, which I stopped wearing due to battery problems.

Good iPhone companion.
I knew this going in, but a week confirmed it. The Apple Watch is closely tied to an iPhone 5 or later. If you don’t have an iPhone or happen to leave it at home while going out for a run or to walk the dog, the Apple Watch will still show the date, time, and your fitness, but it won’t be able to do anything like send and receive messages, give map directions, or anything needing Siri. I haven’t tried this yet, but it looks like you can use Apple Pay without having your phone with you. Which is great if you can find a location where Apple Pay is accepted (again assuming you need something while out for a run or similar situation). This article does a nice job describing what can be done without your iPhone.

I want to buy more apps.
I feel a bit like I own a great new video game console before many of the anticipated titles have been released. Some of my apps came with a shrunk-down display which would work on my phone. Zillow, for example, will show me information about houses and condos nearby, but there isn’t much I can do to narrow down my search. I was hoping for an interesting game or two to download, but then I thought that games might not be a good idea for the Apple Watch since its battery life would be quickly drained by that kind of use. One week in, I’m not surprised that there isn’t more available. The initial iPhone only had the built-in applications with no app store at all. The iPad launched with apps, but many were pixelated versions of iPhone apps.

New interface.
It look me a couple of hours to get used to the new interface – the crown, the button, swiping in different directions, the hard press, etc… I was used to iPhone and iPad functions, so I was tempted try to zoom out by pinching in a tool like Apple Maps. Pinching doesn’t zoom you out. Double-tapping zooms you in, but you can’t get back out that way. The right way to do this is by using the crown to zoom in and out. That make sense once you think about it. The crown helps to keep your fingers from blocking the display. It’s just not what I went to first since there hasn’t been a crown on other Apple devices until now.

Surprised by quick adoption.
The day I received my Apple Watch, I went out to dinner with some family members who were in town. I left a little early to take the dog back to our apartment. On my way home, my watch began to ring. I hadn’t felt or heard my phone ringing in my pocket since I was walking and close to a road with traffic, so if it hadn’t been for the watch, I would have missed the call. I was able to answer the call on my watch and talk through it to the person on the other end. I’ve only taken a few other calls through my watch since then, but on many occasions I’ve received text messages and calendar reminders through a quick tap on the wrist. It has been very nice.

I’m still getting used to this new platform, but I’ve enjoyed it so far. If you want to see what the Apple Watch is like without the presence of the Apple hype machine, there are lots of reviews of Apple Watches showing up on YouTube. I found this one to be a nice overview that would be appropriate for someone who is thinking about getting one or expecting theirs to arrive shortly.


I received my Apple Watch on May 15th. So far, hemophilia I’m really liking it. Here are some thoughts.

Right choice.
As I mentioned in my previous post, I bought the 38mm model with the black sports band along with Apple Care. It’s the least expensive model, which I plan to replace in a couple of years when the technology advances sufficiently. The 38mm size looks perfect on my wrist, but your mileage may vary.

Great for fitness.
My watch friend is kind enough to remind me that sitting for more than an hour is a bad thing and that I should get up and move around. “Get your body moving” has been a common phrase I’ve used on my old running podcast, but now I have something to remind me. It also does a good job tracking my time exercising and roughly how many calories I’m burning through exercise. I feel good when I make my daily goals. In this sense, the Apple Watch is a great replacement for my FitBit, which I stopped wearing due to battery problems.

Good iPhone companion.
I knew this going in, but a week confirmed it. The Apple Watch is closely tied to an iPhone 5 or later. If you don’t have an iPhone or happen to leave it at home while going out for a run or to walk the dog, the Apple Watch will still show the date, time, and your fitness, but it won’t be able to do anything like send and receiving messages, give map directions, or doing anything with Siri. I haven’t tried this yet, but it looks like you can use Apple Pay without having your phone with you. Which is great if you can find a location where Apple Pay is accepted (again assuming you need something while out for a run or similar situation). This article does a nice job describing what can be done without your iPhone.

I want to buy more apps.
I feel a bit like I own a great new video game console before many of the anticipated titles have been released. Some of my apps came with a shrunk-down display which would work on my phone. Zillow, for example, will show me information about houses and condos nearby, but there isn’t much I can do to narrow down my search. I was hoping for an interesting game or two to download, but then I thought that games might not be a good idea for the Apple Watch since its battery life would be quickly drained by that kind of use. One week in, I’m not surprised that there isn’t more available. The initial iPhone only had the built-in applications with no app store at all. The iPad launched with some native apps, but many were pixelated versions of iPhone apps.

New interface.
It look me a couple of hours to get used to the new interface – the crown, the button, swiping in the right direction, the hard press, etc… I was used to iPhone and iPad functions, so I was tempted try to zoom out by pinching in a tool like Apple Maps. Pinching doesn’t zoom you out. Double-tapping zooms you in, but you can’t get back out that way. The right way to do this is by using the crown to zoom in and out. That make sense once you think about it. The crown helps to keep your fingers from blocking the display. It’s just not what I went to first since there hasn’t been a crown on other Apple devices until now.

Surprised by quick adoption.
The day I received my Apple Watch, I went out to dinner with some family members who were in town. I left a little early to take the dog back to our apartment. On my way home, my watch began to ring. I hadn’t felt or heard my phone ringing in my pocket since I was walking and close to a road with traffic, so if it hadn’t been for the watch, I would have missed the call. I was able to answer the call and talk through it to the person on the other end. I’ve only taken a few other calls through my watch since then, but on many occasions I’ve received text messages and calendar reminders through a quick tap on the wrist. It has been very nice.

I’m still getting used to this new platform, but I’ve enjoyed it so far. If you want to see what the Apple Watch is like without the presence of the Apple hype machine, there are lots of reviews of Apple Watches showing up on YouTube. I found this one to be a nice overview that would be appropriate for someone who is thinking about getting one or expecting theirs to arrive shortly.


I received my Apple Watch on May 15th. So far, hemophilia I’m really liking it. Here are some thoughts.

Right choice.
As I mentioned in my previous post, I bought the 38mm model with the black sports band along with Apple Care. It’s the least expensive model, which I plan to replace in a couple of years when the technology advances sufficiently. The 38mm size looks perfect on my wrist, but your mileage may vary.

Great for fitness.
My watch friend is kind enough to remind me that sitting for more than an hour is a bad thing and that I should get up and move around. “Get your body moving” has been a common phrase I’ve used on my old running podcast, but now I have something to remind me. It also does a good job tracking my time exercising and roughly how many calories I’m burning through exercise. I feel good when I make my daily goals. In this sense, the Apple Watch is a great replacement for my FitBit, which I stopped wearing due to battery problems.

Good iPhone companion.
I knew this going in, but a week confirmed it. The Apple Watch is closely tied to an iPhone 5 or later. If you don’t have an iPhone or happen to leave it at home while going out for a run or to walk the dog, the Apple Watch will still show the date, time, and your fitness, but it won’t be able to do anything like send and receiving messages, give map directions, or doing anything with Siri. I haven’t tried this yet, but it looks like you can use Apple Pay without having your phone with you. Which is great if you can find a location where Apple Pay is accepted (again assuming you need something while out for a run or similar situation). This article does a nice job describing what can be done without your iPhone.

I want to buy more apps.
I feel a bit like I own a great new video game console before many of the anticipated titles have been released. Some of my apps came with a shrunk-down display which would work on my phone. Zillow, for example, will show me information about houses and condos nearby, but there isn’t much I can do to narrow down my search. I was hoping for an interesting game or two to download, but then I thought that games might not be a good idea for the Apple Watch since its battery life would be quickly drained by that kind of use. One week in, I’m not surprised that there isn’t more available. The initial iPhone only had the built-in applications with no app store at all. The iPad launched with some native apps, but many were pixelated versions of iPhone apps.

New interface.
It look me a couple of hours to get used to the new interface – the crown, the button, swiping in the right direction, the hard press, etc… I was used to iPhone and iPad functions, so I was tempted try to zoom out by pinching in a tool like Apple Maps. Pinching doesn’t zoom you out. Double-tapping zooms you in, but you can’t get back out that way. The right way to do this is by using the crown to zoom in and out. That make sense once you think about it. The crown helps to keep your fingers from blocking the display. It’s just not what I went to first since there hasn’t been a crown on other Apple devices until now.

Surprised by quick adoption.
The day I received my Apple Watch, I went out to dinner with some family members who were in town. I left a little early to take the dog back to our apartment. On my way home, my watch began to ring. I hadn’t felt or heard my phone ringing in my pocket since I was walking and close to a road with traffic, so if it hadn’t been for the watch, I would have missed the call. I was able to answer the call and talk through it to the person on the other end. I’ve only taken a few other calls through my watch since then, but on many occasions I’ve received text messages and calendar reminders through a quick tap on the wrist. It has been very nice.

I’m still getting used to this new platform, but I’ve enjoyed it so far. If you want to see what the Apple Watch is like without the presence of the Apple hype machine, there are lots of reviews of Apple Watches showing up on YouTube. I found this one to be a nice overview that would be appropriate for someone who is thinking about getting one or expecting theirs to arrive shortly.


Welcome to WordPress. This is your first post. Edit or delete it, sanitary
then start blogging!
I received my Apple Watch on May 15th. So far, hemophilia I’m really liking it. Here are some thoughts.

Right choice.
As I mentioned in my previous post, I bought the 38mm model with the black sports band along with Apple Care. It’s the least expensive model, which I plan to replace in a couple of years when the technology advances sufficiently. The 38mm size looks perfect on my wrist, but your mileage may vary.

Great for fitness.
My watch friend is kind enough to remind me that sitting for more than an hour is a bad thing and that I should get up and move around. “Get your body moving” has been a common phrase I’ve used on my old running podcast, but now I have something to remind me. It also does a good job tracking my time exercising and roughly how many calories I’m burning through exercise. I feel good when I make my daily goals. In this sense, the Apple Watch is a great replacement for my FitBit, which I stopped wearing due to battery problems.

Good iPhone companion.
I knew this going in, but a week confirmed it. The Apple Watch is closely tied to an iPhone 5 or later. If you don’t have an iPhone or happen to leave it at home while going out for a run or to walk the dog, the Apple Watch will still show the date, time, and your fitness, but it won’t be able to do anything like send and receiving messages, give map directions, or doing anything with Siri. I haven’t tried this yet, but it looks like you can use Apple Pay without having your phone with you. Which is great if you can find a location where Apple Pay is accepted (again assuming you need something while out for a run or similar situation). This article does a nice job describing what can be done without your iPhone.

I want to buy more apps.
I feel a bit like I own a great new video game console before many of the anticipated titles have been released. Some of my apps came with a shrunk-down display which would work on my phone. Zillow, for example, will show me information about houses and condos nearby, but there isn’t much I can do to narrow down my search. I was hoping for an interesting game or two to download, but then I thought that games might not be a good idea for the Apple Watch since its battery life would be quickly drained by that kind of use. One week in, I’m not surprised that there isn’t more available. The initial iPhone only had the built-in applications with no app store at all. The iPad launched with some native apps, but many were pixelated versions of iPhone apps.

New interface.
It look me a couple of hours to get used to the new interface – the crown, the button, swiping in the right direction, the hard press, etc… I was used to iPhone and iPad functions, so I was tempted try to zoom out by pinching in a tool like Apple Maps. Pinching doesn’t zoom you out. Double-tapping zooms you in, but you can’t get back out that way. The right way to do this is by using the crown to zoom in and out. That make sense once you think about it. The crown helps to keep your fingers from blocking the display. It’s just not what I went to first since there hasn’t been a crown on other Apple devices until now.

Surprised by quick adoption.
The day I received my Apple Watch, I went out to dinner with some family members who were in town. I left a little early to take the dog back to our apartment. On my way home, my watch began to ring. I hadn’t felt or heard my phone ringing in my pocket since I was walking and close to a road with traffic, so if it hadn’t been for the watch, I would have missed the call. I was able to answer the call and talk through it to the person on the other end. I’ve only taken a few other calls through my watch since then, but on many occasions I’ve received text messages and calendar reminders through a quick tap on the wrist. It has been very nice.

I’m still getting used to this new platform, but I’ve enjoyed it so far. If you want to see what the Apple Watch is like without the presence of the Apple hype machine, there are lots of reviews of Apple Watches showing up on YouTube. I found this one to be a nice overview that would be appropriate for someone who is thinking about getting one or expecting theirs to arrive shortly.


Welcome to WordPress. This is your first post. Edit or delete it, sanitary
then start blogging!
I received my Apple Watch on May 15th. So far, hemophilia I’m really liking it. Here are some thoughts.

Right choice.
As I mentioned in my previous post, I bought the 38mm model with the black sports band along with Apple Care. It’s the least expensive model, which I plan to replace in a couple of years when the technology advances sufficiently. The 38mm size looks perfect on my wrist, but your mileage may vary.

Great for fitness.
My watch friend is kind enough to remind me that sitting for more than an hour is a bad thing and that I should get up and move around. “Get your body moving” has been a common phrase I’ve used on my old running podcast, but now I have something to remind me. It also does a good job tracking my time exercising and roughly how many calories I’m burning through exercise. I feel good when I make my daily goals. In this sense, the Apple Watch is a great replacement for my FitBit, which I stopped wearing due to battery problems.

Good iPhone companion.
I knew this going in, but a week confirmed it. The Apple Watch is closely tied to an iPhone 5 or later. If you don’t have an iPhone or happen to leave it at home while going out for a run or to walk the dog, the Apple Watch will still show the date, time, and your fitness, but it won’t be able to do anything like send and receiving messages, give map directions, or doing anything with Siri. I haven’t tried this yet, but it looks like you can use Apple Pay without having your phone with you. Which is great if you can find a location where Apple Pay is accepted (again assuming you need something while out for a run or similar situation). This article does a nice job describing what can be done without your iPhone.

I want to buy more apps.
I feel a bit like I own a great new video game console before many of the anticipated titles have been released. Some of my apps came with a shrunk-down display which would work on my phone. Zillow, for example, will show me information about houses and condos nearby, but there isn’t much I can do to narrow down my search. I was hoping for an interesting game or two to download, but then I thought that games might not be a good idea for the Apple Watch since its battery life would be quickly drained by that kind of use. One week in, I’m not surprised that there isn’t more available. The initial iPhone only had the built-in applications with no app store at all. The iPad launched with some native apps, but many were pixelated versions of iPhone apps.

New interface.
It look me a couple of hours to get used to the new interface – the crown, the button, swiping in the right direction, the hard press, etc… I was used to iPhone and iPad functions, so I was tempted try to zoom out by pinching in a tool like Apple Maps. Pinching doesn’t zoom you out. Double-tapping zooms you in, but you can’t get back out that way. The right way to do this is by using the crown to zoom in and out. That make sense once you think about it. The crown helps to keep your fingers from blocking the display. It’s just not what I went to first since there hasn’t been a crown on other Apple devices until now.

Surprised by quick adoption.
The day I received my Apple Watch, I went out to dinner with some family members who were in town. I left a little early to take the dog back to our apartment. On my way home, my watch began to ring. I hadn’t felt or heard my phone ringing in my pocket since I was walking and close to a road with traffic, so if it hadn’t been for the watch, I would have missed the call. I was able to answer the call and talk through it to the person on the other end. I’ve only taken a few other calls through my watch since then, but on many occasions I’ve received text messages and calendar reminders through a quick tap on the wrist. It has been very nice.

I’m still getting used to this new platform, but I’ve enjoyed it so far. If you want to see what the Apple Watch is like without the presence of the Apple hype machine, there are lots of reviews of Apple Watches showing up on YouTube. I found this one to be a nice overview that would be appropriate for someone who is thinking about getting one or expecting theirs to arrive shortly.


Welcome to WordPress. This is your first post. Edit or delete it, sanitary
then start blogging!
This is an example of a WordPress page, discount you could edit this to put information about yourself or your site so readers know where you are coming from. You can create as many pages like this one or sub-pages as you like and manage all of your content inside of WordPress.
chumby.JPG
I seem to always be looking for that thing – the one device that is going to make my life a little bit easier. Something that would help me keep on top of things. Or at least something that would make my life a little more fun. I started along these lines back in the early 1990’s when I got my first PDA: Apple’s Newton. I loved that thing, anabolics but it was a bit too big. Then I moved through Palm Pilots and WindowsCE/PocketPC devices. I’ve looked into linux PDAs, Playstation Portable (PSP), PDA watches, and smart phones. Each purchase is a risk since I’ve found there to be a very small line between that thing that makes your life a little better and junk that piles up in a drawer because it was not quite good enough: too slow, too difficult, too hot, too heavy, too locked down, too big, too fragile, etc…

Enter the Chumby. It’s like the offspring of a Mac Mini and a Tribble. More accurately, if a smart phone is a cell phone + PDA, then the Chumby is a smart alarm clock of sorts. It certainly will have the bedside/alarm functionality, but instead of the same old “the world is about to end” buzzing noise or a radio program of choice, the Chumby can run Flash Lite programs — simple widgets that can do things like download and display news feeds, show the phases of the moon, show webcams, play MP3 audio, and whatever else the community developers decide to create and share with everyone else.

See, that’s the beauty of all of this. They WANT you to hack the Chumby and write your own software for it. What a brilliant idea. It makes me want to dust off my Flash skills and write a Lost countdown clock like the one in the bunker. Games? Sure, why not. Okay, don’t think you’re going to get World of Warcraft running on a Chumby — the hardware isn’t up to it. But if you wanted a little Tetris before going off to bed, I don’t see any problem there as long as you find someone to program it.

They’re planning to sell these for around $150. That’s really not bad at all considering that digital photo frames sell for at least that much (often more) and all they do is show your photos. I’m ready to buy one now. Maybe two (one for my office, one for home). Unfortunately, they won’t be available until at least March 2007.

Until then, I’ll just have to wish them luck and spread the word.
chumby.JPG
I seem to always be looking for that thing – the one device that is going to make my life a little bit easier. Something that would help me keep on top of things. Or at least something that would make my life a little more fun. I started along these lines back in the early 1990’s when I got my first PDA: Apple’s Newton. I loved that thing, anabolics but it was a bit too big. Then I moved through Palm Pilots and WindowsCE/PocketPC devices. I’ve looked into linux PDAs, Playstation Portable (PSP), PDA watches, and smart phones. Each purchase is a risk since I’ve found there to be a very small line between that thing that makes your life a little better and junk that piles up in a drawer because it was not quite good enough: too slow, too difficult, too hot, too heavy, too locked down, too big, too fragile, etc…

Enter the Chumby. It’s like the offspring of a Mac Mini and a Tribble. More accurately, if a smart phone is a cell phone + PDA, then the Chumby is a smart alarm clock of sorts. It certainly will have the bedside/alarm functionality, but instead of the same old “the world is about to end” buzzing noise or a radio program of choice, the Chumby can run Flash Lite programs — simple widgets that can do things like download and display news feeds, show the phases of the moon, show webcams, play MP3 audio, and whatever else the community developers decide to create and share with everyone else.

See, that’s the beauty of all of this. They WANT you to hack the Chumby and write your own software for it. What a brilliant idea. It makes me want to dust off my Flash skills and write a Lost countdown clock like the one in the bunker. Games? Sure, why not. Okay, don’t think you’re going to get World of Warcraft running on a Chumby — the hardware isn’t up to it. But if you wanted a little Tetris before going off to bed, I don’t see any problem there as long as you find someone to program it.

They’re planning to sell these for around $150. That’s really not bad at all considering that digital photo frames sell for at least that much (often more) and all they do is show your photos. I’m ready to buy one now. Maybe two (one for my office, one for home). Unfortunately, they won’t be available until at least March 2007.

Until then, I’ll just have to wish them luck and spread the word.
Andrew and I just came back from seeing Run Fatboy Run. It wasn’t as laugh-out-loud funny as I thought it would be, buy but overall, sickness it was a sweet and sentimental romantic comedy. The movie does a good job capturing the feeling of being out of shape and setting your goals on something as seemingly-overwhelming as a marathon. It also makes some good points about the parallels between being dedicated enough to be a long distance runner and having the same kind of commitment in other aspects of your life. The main character could have just as easily been trying to swim the English Channel or climb a mountain or something, but running is a good choice because it’s so accessible.

So as a whole, it was a good way to spend a Saturday night. Now off to bed. Tomorrow, I’ll be doing an afternoon run and then podcasting.

Posted in movies, running | Comments Off on Quick Thoughts on Run Fatboy Run

Run Fatboy Run

Potato cake dish from Herwig’s restaurant.
Potato cake dish from Herwig’s restaurant.
Jeff and I have gotten together and selected our next marathon. It looks like we’ll be doing the Flying Pig Marathon on May 4th, global burden of disease 2008 in Cincinnati, therapist Ohio. It should fit our criteria: not too hot, sildenafil not too far, Spring marathon, big event. In addition to the marathon, they also have a 5K, 10K, and half-marathon, so if you’ve been thinking of running a race, you’re welcome to join us!

Potato cake dish from Herwig’s restaurant.
Jeff and I have gotten together and selected our next marathon. It looks like we’ll be doing the Flying Pig Marathon on May 4th, global burden of disease 2008 in Cincinnati, therapist Ohio. It should fit our criteria: not too hot, sildenafil not too far, Spring marathon, big event. In addition to the marathon, they also have a 5K, 10K, and half-marathon, so if you’ve been thinking of running a race, you’re welcome to join us!

I ran across a news story this morning about air-powered cars that should get the equivalent of 100 MPG and run for 1000 miles on one fill-up of fuel and compressed air.  The cars should hit the US market in 2009 or 2010 and cost about $17, abortion 800.  At speeds less than 35 MPH, the car emits only filtered air.  Above that, it uses air and a small amount of fuel (used to heat the air).  Max speed is supposed to be 90-100 MPH. 

Um — yes on all accounts.  Low emissions, cost efficient, and in the same range or cheaper than a hybrid car.  Now, as long as this actually shows up in the marketplace and it’s full of first-generation bugs, I’m sold.

Powered by ScribeFire.

Potato cake dish from Herwig’s restaurant.
Jeff and I have gotten together and selected our next marathon. It looks like we’ll be doing the Flying Pig Marathon on May 4th, global burden of disease 2008 in Cincinnati, therapist Ohio. It should fit our criteria: not too hot, sildenafil not too far, Spring marathon, big event. In addition to the marathon, they also have a 5K, 10K, and half-marathon, so if you’ve been thinking of running a race, you’re welcome to join us!

I ran across a news story this morning about air-powered cars that should get the equivalent of 100 MPG and run for 1000 miles on one fill-up of fuel and compressed air.  The cars should hit the US market in 2009 or 2010 and cost about $17, abortion 800.  At speeds less than 35 MPH, the car emits only filtered air.  Above that, it uses air and a small amount of fuel (used to heat the air).  Max speed is supposed to be 90-100 MPH. 

Um — yes on all accounts.  Low emissions, cost efficient, and in the same range or cheaper than a hybrid car.  Now, as long as this actually shows up in the marketplace and it’s full of first-generation bugs, I’m sold.

Powered by ScribeFire.

I have been thinking about creating a marathon podcast (i.e. a podcast about my running). I don’t have any grand plans for it, food but I like podcasting and I like the thought that some random person may listen to what we have to say and then go for a run. I say “we” because I’m thinking about podcasting with Jeff (my running partner). I like the multi-person format. As for content, contagion I thought we could talk about training, our runs, health, injuries, shoes (and other technical gear), books, articles, funny stories, gadgets, etc… I’d also like to have other runners on the show and talk to them about their runs, why they run, and how it has impacted their lives. Oh…and I just thought of this…I happen to know someone who has been trying out for the Olympics and a few grad students in the Biobehavioral Health program at Penn State who would have interesting perspectives.

In any case, in my thought process about this, I checked Google and iTunes to see what running podcasts were already out there. This episode looks particularly interesting, first because it’s one of only a few podcasts that have been made while someone is running a marathon, but second because it was made during the 2007 Philadelphia Marathon, which was my first.

Link to iTunes:
Phedippidations: The Philly Marathon
Potato cake dish from Herwig’s restaurant.
Jeff and I have gotten together and selected our next marathon. It looks like we’ll be doing the Flying Pig Marathon on May 4th, global burden of disease 2008 in Cincinnati, therapist Ohio. It should fit our criteria: not too hot, sildenafil not too far, Spring marathon, big event. In addition to the marathon, they also have a 5K, 10K, and half-marathon, so if you’ve been thinking of running a race, you’re welcome to join us!

I ran across a news story this morning about air-powered cars that should get the equivalent of 100 MPG and run for 1000 miles on one fill-up of fuel and compressed air.  The cars should hit the US market in 2009 or 2010 and cost about $17, abortion 800.  At speeds less than 35 MPH, the car emits only filtered air.  Above that, it uses air and a small amount of fuel (used to heat the air).  Max speed is supposed to be 90-100 MPH. 

Um — yes on all accounts.  Low emissions, cost efficient, and in the same range or cheaper than a hybrid car.  Now, as long as this actually shows up in the marketplace and it’s full of first-generation bugs, I’m sold.

Powered by ScribeFire.

I have been thinking about creating a marathon podcast (i.e. a podcast about my running). I don’t have any grand plans for it, food but I like podcasting and I like the thought that some random person may listen to what we have to say and then go for a run. I say “we” because I’m thinking about podcasting with Jeff (my running partner). I like the multi-person format. As for content, contagion I thought we could talk about training, our runs, health, injuries, shoes (and other technical gear), books, articles, funny stories, gadgets, etc… I’d also like to have other runners on the show and talk to them about their runs, why they run, and how it has impacted their lives. Oh…and I just thought of this…I happen to know someone who has been trying out for the Olympics and a few grad students in the Biobehavioral Health program at Penn State who would have interesting perspectives.

In any case, in my thought process about this, I checked Google and iTunes to see what running podcasts were already out there. This episode looks particularly interesting, first because it’s one of only a few podcasts that have been made while someone is running a marathon, but second because it was made during the 2007 Philadelphia Marathon, which was my first.

Link to iTunes:
Phedippidations: The Philly Marathon
I told Jeff about my idea for a marathon podcast before our 16-mile run today and he liked the idea, ambulance so after the run, we sat down and made a recording. In this first episode of Running with the Pack, Jeff and I talk a little about ourselves, the reasons we run marathons, the people who have inspired us, a few stories about the Philadelphia Marathon, and what we’re doing to prepare for the Flying Pig Marathon in May.

Updates to the information in the podcast:

  • The name of the book is the Non-Runner’s Marathon Trainer (see right sidebar, I have it listed)
  • The Wired Magazine article was about ultramarathon runner Dean Karnazes and it was the January 2007 issue. I have his book in the sidebar as well.

Potato cake dish from Herwig’s restaurant.
Jeff and I have gotten together and selected our next marathon. It looks like we’ll be doing the Flying Pig Marathon on May 4th, global burden of disease 2008 in Cincinnati, therapist Ohio. It should fit our criteria: not too hot, sildenafil not too far, Spring marathon, big event. In addition to the marathon, they also have a 5K, 10K, and half-marathon, so if you’ve been thinking of running a race, you’re welcome to join us!

I ran across a news story this morning about air-powered cars that should get the equivalent of 100 MPG and run for 1000 miles on one fill-up of fuel and compressed air.  The cars should hit the US market in 2009 or 2010 and cost about $17, abortion 800.  At speeds less than 35 MPH, the car emits only filtered air.  Above that, it uses air and a small amount of fuel (used to heat the air).  Max speed is supposed to be 90-100 MPH. 

Um — yes on all accounts.  Low emissions, cost efficient, and in the same range or cheaper than a hybrid car.  Now, as long as this actually shows up in the marketplace and it’s full of first-generation bugs, I’m sold.

Powered by ScribeFire.

I have been thinking about creating a marathon podcast (i.e. a podcast about my running). I don’t have any grand plans for it, food but I like podcasting and I like the thought that some random person may listen to what we have to say and then go for a run. I say “we” because I’m thinking about podcasting with Jeff (my running partner). I like the multi-person format. As for content, contagion I thought we could talk about training, our runs, health, injuries, shoes (and other technical gear), books, articles, funny stories, gadgets, etc… I’d also like to have other runners on the show and talk to them about their runs, why they run, and how it has impacted their lives. Oh…and I just thought of this…I happen to know someone who has been trying out for the Olympics and a few grad students in the Biobehavioral Health program at Penn State who would have interesting perspectives.

In any case, in my thought process about this, I checked Google and iTunes to see what running podcasts were already out there. This episode looks particularly interesting, first because it’s one of only a few podcasts that have been made while someone is running a marathon, but second because it was made during the 2007 Philadelphia Marathon, which was my first.

Link to iTunes:
Phedippidations: The Philly Marathon
I told Jeff about my idea for a marathon podcast before our 16-mile run today and he liked the idea, ambulance so after the run, we sat down and made a recording. In this first episode of Running with the Pack, Jeff and I talk a little about ourselves, the reasons we run marathons, the people who have inspired us, a few stories about the Philadelphia Marathon, and what we’re doing to prepare for the Flying Pig Marathon in May.

Updates to the information in the podcast:

  • The name of the book is the Non-Runner’s Marathon Trainer (see right sidebar, I have it listed)
  • The Wired Magazine article was about ultramarathon runner Dean Karnazes and it was the January 2007 issue. I have his book in the sidebar as well.

This week, for sale we discussed running rituals; runners who hate running; Buster Martin, who may become the worlds oldest marathon runner; backup marathons; and Brandon’s Marathon Podcast at brandonsmarathon.com. All of this after a 12-mile run that should have been a 16-mile run. Read more at parkedthoughts.com

Potato cake dish from Herwig’s restaurant.
Jeff and I have gotten together and selected our next marathon. It looks like we’ll be doing the Flying Pig Marathon on May 4th, global burden of disease 2008 in Cincinnati, therapist Ohio. It should fit our criteria: not too hot, sildenafil not too far, Spring marathon, big event. In addition to the marathon, they also have a 5K, 10K, and half-marathon, so if you’ve been thinking of running a race, you’re welcome to join us!

I ran across a news story this morning about air-powered cars that should get the equivalent of 100 MPG and run for 1000 miles on one fill-up of fuel and compressed air.  The cars should hit the US market in 2009 or 2010 and cost about $17, abortion 800.  At speeds less than 35 MPH, the car emits only filtered air.  Above that, it uses air and a small amount of fuel (used to heat the air).  Max speed is supposed to be 90-100 MPH. 

Um — yes on all accounts.  Low emissions, cost efficient, and in the same range or cheaper than a hybrid car.  Now, as long as this actually shows up in the marketplace and it’s full of first-generation bugs, I’m sold.

Powered by ScribeFire.

I have been thinking about creating a marathon podcast (i.e. a podcast about my running). I don’t have any grand plans for it, food but I like podcasting and I like the thought that some random person may listen to what we have to say and then go for a run. I say “we” because I’m thinking about podcasting with Jeff (my running partner). I like the multi-person format. As for content, contagion I thought we could talk about training, our runs, health, injuries, shoes (and other technical gear), books, articles, funny stories, gadgets, etc… I’d also like to have other runners on the show and talk to them about their runs, why they run, and how it has impacted their lives. Oh…and I just thought of this…I happen to know someone who has been trying out for the Olympics and a few grad students in the Biobehavioral Health program at Penn State who would have interesting perspectives.

In any case, in my thought process about this, I checked Google and iTunes to see what running podcasts were already out there. This episode looks particularly interesting, first because it’s one of only a few podcasts that have been made while someone is running a marathon, but second because it was made during the 2007 Philadelphia Marathon, which was my first.

Link to iTunes:
Phedippidations: The Philly Marathon
I told Jeff about my idea for a marathon podcast before our 16-mile run today and he liked the idea, ambulance so after the run, we sat down and made a recording. In this first episode of Running with the Pack, Jeff and I talk a little about ourselves, the reasons we run marathons, the people who have inspired us, a few stories about the Philadelphia Marathon, and what we’re doing to prepare for the Flying Pig Marathon in May.

Updates to the information in the podcast:

  • The name of the book is the Non-Runner’s Marathon Trainer (see right sidebar, I have it listed)
  • The Wired Magazine article was about ultramarathon runner Dean Karnazes and it was the January 2007 issue. I have his book in the sidebar as well.

This week, for sale we discussed running rituals; runners who hate running; Buster Martin, who may become the worlds oldest marathon runner; backup marathons; and Brandon’s Marathon Podcast at brandonsmarathon.com. All of this after a 12-mile run that should have been a 16-mile run. Read more at parkedthoughts.com

This weekend, salve I made a quick trip to Johnstown and was able to see a large group of relatives from my dad’s side of the family. Among them was Dave, artificial who is one of the cousins that I mentioned in the first podcast who has completed a marathon. I talked to him about his running and it turns out that he did a lot more than a marathon. He was doing two a year for several years and I think he said that he did the Detroit marathon eight times. He has also run in Cleveland and Pittsburgh at least twice. Like me, he’s not fast, but a P.R. of about 3:30 is not slow either. He’s now approaching 60 and still excited about his running.

We talked about the potential to do an event together and I’m all for it. He’s recovering from an injury now though — if he wasn’t, I would have invited him to do the half-marathon race that happens the same time as the Flying Pig marathon in Cincinnati. Or if he moves to Florida at some point, we may have to join up for the Orlando marathon. I wonder if that would be interesting for my other potential pack-mates who have kids since the Orlando marathon is pretty integrated with Disney World.
Potato cake dish from Herwig’s restaurant.
Jeff and I have gotten together and selected our next marathon. It looks like we’ll be doing the Flying Pig Marathon on May 4th, global burden of disease 2008 in Cincinnati, therapist Ohio. It should fit our criteria: not too hot, sildenafil not too far, Spring marathon, big event. In addition to the marathon, they also have a 5K, 10K, and half-marathon, so if you’ve been thinking of running a race, you’re welcome to join us!

I ran across a news story this morning about air-powered cars that should get the equivalent of 100 MPG and run for 1000 miles on one fill-up of fuel and compressed air.  The cars should hit the US market in 2009 or 2010 and cost about $17, abortion 800.  At speeds less than 35 MPH, the car emits only filtered air.  Above that, it uses air and a small amount of fuel (used to heat the air).  Max speed is supposed to be 90-100 MPH. 

Um — yes on all accounts.  Low emissions, cost efficient, and in the same range or cheaper than a hybrid car.  Now, as long as this actually shows up in the marketplace and it’s full of first-generation bugs, I’m sold.

Powered by ScribeFire.

I have been thinking about creating a marathon podcast (i.e. a podcast about my running). I don’t have any grand plans for it, food but I like podcasting and I like the thought that some random person may listen to what we have to say and then go for a run. I say “we” because I’m thinking about podcasting with Jeff (my running partner). I like the multi-person format. As for content, contagion I thought we could talk about training, our runs, health, injuries, shoes (and other technical gear), books, articles, funny stories, gadgets, etc… I’d also like to have other runners on the show and talk to them about their runs, why they run, and how it has impacted their lives. Oh…and I just thought of this…I happen to know someone who has been trying out for the Olympics and a few grad students in the Biobehavioral Health program at Penn State who would have interesting perspectives.

In any case, in my thought process about this, I checked Google and iTunes to see what running podcasts were already out there. This episode looks particularly interesting, first because it’s one of only a few podcasts that have been made while someone is running a marathon, but second because it was made during the 2007 Philadelphia Marathon, which was my first.

Link to iTunes:
Phedippidations: The Philly Marathon
I told Jeff about my idea for a marathon podcast before our 16-mile run today and he liked the idea, ambulance so after the run, we sat down and made a recording. In this first episode of Running with the Pack, Jeff and I talk a little about ourselves, the reasons we run marathons, the people who have inspired us, a few stories about the Philadelphia Marathon, and what we’re doing to prepare for the Flying Pig Marathon in May.

Updates to the information in the podcast:

  • The name of the book is the Non-Runner’s Marathon Trainer (see right sidebar, I have it listed)
  • The Wired Magazine article was about ultramarathon runner Dean Karnazes and it was the January 2007 issue. I have his book in the sidebar as well.

This week, for sale we discussed running rituals; runners who hate running; Buster Martin, who may become the worlds oldest marathon runner; backup marathons; and Brandon’s Marathon Podcast at brandonsmarathon.com. All of this after a 12-mile run that should have been a 16-mile run. Read more at parkedthoughts.com

This weekend, salve I made a quick trip to Johnstown and was able to see a large group of relatives from my dad’s side of the family. Among them was Dave, artificial who is one of the cousins that I mentioned in the first podcast who has completed a marathon. I talked to him about his running and it turns out that he did a lot more than a marathon. He was doing two a year for several years and I think he said that he did the Detroit marathon eight times. He has also run in Cleveland and Pittsburgh at least twice. Like me, he’s not fast, but a P.R. of about 3:30 is not slow either. He’s now approaching 60 and still excited about his running.

We talked about the potential to do an event together and I’m all for it. He’s recovering from an injury now though — if he wasn’t, I would have invited him to do the half-marathon race that happens the same time as the Flying Pig marathon in Cincinnati. Or if he moves to Florida at some point, we may have to join up for the Orlando marathon. I wonder if that would be interesting for my other potential pack-mates who have kids since the Orlando marathon is pretty integrated with Disney World.
I’ve been hearing a bit about Buster Martin, pill a 101-year-old man who is planning to run the London Marathon. I think he’s setting a great example and illustrating the benefits of staying healthy throughout an entire lifetime (he used to be an Army Trainer back in the day). Best wishes Buster!

ABC News Report about Buster
Potato cake dish from Herwig’s restaurant.
Jeff and I have gotten together and selected our next marathon. It looks like we’ll be doing the Flying Pig Marathon on May 4th, global burden of disease 2008 in Cincinnati, therapist Ohio. It should fit our criteria: not too hot, sildenafil not too far, Spring marathon, big event. In addition to the marathon, they also have a 5K, 10K, and half-marathon, so if you’ve been thinking of running a race, you’re welcome to join us!

I ran across a news story this morning about air-powered cars that should get the equivalent of 100 MPG and run for 1000 miles on one fill-up of fuel and compressed air.  The cars should hit the US market in 2009 or 2010 and cost about $17, abortion 800.  At speeds less than 35 MPH, the car emits only filtered air.  Above that, it uses air and a small amount of fuel (used to heat the air).  Max speed is supposed to be 90-100 MPH. 

Um — yes on all accounts.  Low emissions, cost efficient, and in the same range or cheaper than a hybrid car.  Now, as long as this actually shows up in the marketplace and it’s full of first-generation bugs, I’m sold.

Powered by ScribeFire.

I have been thinking about creating a marathon podcast (i.e. a podcast about my running). I don’t have any grand plans for it, food but I like podcasting and I like the thought that some random person may listen to what we have to say and then go for a run. I say “we” because I’m thinking about podcasting with Jeff (my running partner). I like the multi-person format. As for content, contagion I thought we could talk about training, our runs, health, injuries, shoes (and other technical gear), books, articles, funny stories, gadgets, etc… I’d also like to have other runners on the show and talk to them about their runs, why they run, and how it has impacted their lives. Oh…and I just thought of this…I happen to know someone who has been trying out for the Olympics and a few grad students in the Biobehavioral Health program at Penn State who would have interesting perspectives.

In any case, in my thought process about this, I checked Google and iTunes to see what running podcasts were already out there. This episode looks particularly interesting, first because it’s one of only a few podcasts that have been made while someone is running a marathon, but second because it was made during the 2007 Philadelphia Marathon, which was my first.

Link to iTunes:
Phedippidations: The Philly Marathon
I told Jeff about my idea for a marathon podcast before our 16-mile run today and he liked the idea, ambulance so after the run, we sat down and made a recording. In this first episode of Running with the Pack, Jeff and I talk a little about ourselves, the reasons we run marathons, the people who have inspired us, a few stories about the Philadelphia Marathon, and what we’re doing to prepare for the Flying Pig Marathon in May.

Updates to the information in the podcast:

  • The name of the book is the Non-Runner’s Marathon Trainer (see right sidebar, I have it listed)
  • The Wired Magazine article was about ultramarathon runner Dean Karnazes and it was the January 2007 issue. I have his book in the sidebar as well.

This week, for sale we discussed running rituals; runners who hate running; Buster Martin, who may become the worlds oldest marathon runner; backup marathons; and Brandon’s Marathon Podcast at brandonsmarathon.com. All of this after a 12-mile run that should have been a 16-mile run. Read more at parkedthoughts.com

This weekend, salve I made a quick trip to Johnstown and was able to see a large group of relatives from my dad’s side of the family. Among them was Dave, artificial who is one of the cousins that I mentioned in the first podcast who has completed a marathon. I talked to him about his running and it turns out that he did a lot more than a marathon. He was doing two a year for several years and I think he said that he did the Detroit marathon eight times. He has also run in Cleveland and Pittsburgh at least twice. Like me, he’s not fast, but a P.R. of about 3:30 is not slow either. He’s now approaching 60 and still excited about his running.

We talked about the potential to do an event together and I’m all for it. He’s recovering from an injury now though — if he wasn’t, I would have invited him to do the half-marathon race that happens the same time as the Flying Pig marathon in Cincinnati. Or if he moves to Florida at some point, we may have to join up for the Orlando marathon. I wonder if that would be interesting for my other potential pack-mates who have kids since the Orlando marathon is pretty integrated with Disney World.
I’ve been hearing a bit about Buster Martin, pill a 101-year-old man who is planning to run the London Marathon. I think he’s setting a great example and illustrating the benefits of staying healthy throughout an entire lifetime (he used to be an Army Trainer back in the day). Best wishes Buster!

ABC News Report about Buster
The title of this post refers back to a question that we asked ourselves in podcast #2. Do I love running? Have I always loved running? The answers are yes and no respectively. The short version is that at times, web I got back into running because I wanted to lose some weight and get into shape. Running used to be a means to an end — and if I could get the same result from sitting on the couch and eating cupcakes, gynecologist I would have opted for the cupcake route. When you’re not in shape, this web running is awkward, painful, and feels a little like having a heart attack, especially if hills are involved. At least that’s how it is for me when I haven’t been running for an extended period.

And actually, I have turned to swimming and backpacking over the years as a fitness/stress activity. Both have limitations though. I love the gliding/flying feeling of swimming, but it kills my skin in the winter and the pool where I would swim has very limited hours. Backpacking is great, but it requires long stretches of time to actually get on a trail and let things go. Some of my best decisions have been made during long, quiet backpacking trips.

So while swimming and hiking are fun from the start, running took some time to really grow on me. I love it now, but it took time to build up my confidence, running identity, and a healthy endorphin addiction.
Potato cake dish from Herwig’s restaurant.
Jeff and I have gotten together and selected our next marathon. It looks like we’ll be doing the Flying Pig Marathon on May 4th, global burden of disease 2008 in Cincinnati, therapist Ohio. It should fit our criteria: not too hot, sildenafil not too far, Spring marathon, big event. In addition to the marathon, they also have a 5K, 10K, and half-marathon, so if you’ve been thinking of running a race, you’re welcome to join us!

I ran across a news story this morning about air-powered cars that should get the equivalent of 100 MPG and run for 1000 miles on one fill-up of fuel and compressed air.  The cars should hit the US market in 2009 or 2010 and cost about $17, abortion 800.  At speeds less than 35 MPH, the car emits only filtered air.  Above that, it uses air and a small amount of fuel (used to heat the air).  Max speed is supposed to be 90-100 MPH. 

Um — yes on all accounts.  Low emissions, cost efficient, and in the same range or cheaper than a hybrid car.  Now, as long as this actually shows up in the marketplace and it’s full of first-generation bugs, I’m sold.

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I have been thinking about creating a marathon podcast (i.e. a podcast about my running). I don’t have any grand plans for it, food but I like podcasting and I like the thought that some random person may listen to what we have to say and then go for a run. I say “we” because I’m thinking about podcasting with Jeff (my running partner). I like the multi-person format. As for content, contagion I thought we could talk about training, our runs, health, injuries, shoes (and other technical gear), books, articles, funny stories, gadgets, etc… I’d also like to have other runners on the show and talk to them about their runs, why they run, and how it has impacted their lives. Oh…and I just thought of this…I happen to know someone who has been trying out for the Olympics and a few grad students in the Biobehavioral Health program at Penn State who would have interesting perspectives.

In any case, in my thought process about this, I checked Google and iTunes to see what running podcasts were already out there. This episode looks particularly interesting, first because it’s one of only a few podcasts that have been made while someone is running a marathon, but second because it was made during the 2007 Philadelphia Marathon, which was my first.

Link to iTunes:
Phedippidations: The Philly Marathon
I told Jeff about my idea for a marathon podcast before our 16-mile run today and he liked the idea, ambulance so after the run, we sat down and made a recording. In this first episode of Running with the Pack, Jeff and I talk a little about ourselves, the reasons we run marathons, the people who have inspired us, a few stories about the Philadelphia Marathon, and what we’re doing to prepare for the Flying Pig Marathon in May.

Updates to the information in the podcast:

  • The name of the book is the Non-Runner’s Marathon Trainer (see right sidebar, I have it listed)
  • The Wired Magazine article was about ultramarathon runner Dean Karnazes and it was the January 2007 issue. I have his book in the sidebar as well.

This week, for sale we discussed running rituals; runners who hate running; Buster Martin, who may become the worlds oldest marathon runner; backup marathons; and Brandon’s Marathon Podcast at brandonsmarathon.com. All of this after a 12-mile run that should have been a 16-mile run. Read more at parkedthoughts.com

This weekend, salve I made a quick trip to Johnstown and was able to see a large group of relatives from my dad’s side of the family. Among them was Dave, artificial who is one of the cousins that I mentioned in the first podcast who has completed a marathon. I talked to him about his running and it turns out that he did a lot more than a marathon. He was doing two a year for several years and I think he said that he did the Detroit marathon eight times. He has also run in Cleveland and Pittsburgh at least twice. Like me, he’s not fast, but a P.R. of about 3:30 is not slow either. He’s now approaching 60 and still excited about his running.

We talked about the potential to do an event together and I’m all for it. He’s recovering from an injury now though — if he wasn’t, I would have invited him to do the half-marathon race that happens the same time as the Flying Pig marathon in Cincinnati. Or if he moves to Florida at some point, we may have to join up for the Orlando marathon. I wonder if that would be interesting for my other potential pack-mates who have kids since the Orlando marathon is pretty integrated with Disney World.
I’ve been hearing a bit about Buster Martin, pill a 101-year-old man who is planning to run the London Marathon. I think he’s setting a great example and illustrating the benefits of staying healthy throughout an entire lifetime (he used to be an Army Trainer back in the day). Best wishes Buster!

ABC News Report about Buster
The title of this post refers back to a question that we asked ourselves in podcast #2. Do I love running? Have I always loved running? The answers are yes and no respectively. The short version is that at times, web I got back into running because I wanted to lose some weight and get into shape. Running used to be a means to an end — and if I could get the same result from sitting on the couch and eating cupcakes, gynecologist I would have opted for the cupcake route. When you’re not in shape, this web running is awkward, painful, and feels a little like having a heart attack, especially if hills are involved. At least that’s how it is for me when I haven’t been running for an extended period.

And actually, I have turned to swimming and backpacking over the years as a fitness/stress activity. Both have limitations though. I love the gliding/flying feeling of swimming, but it kills my skin in the winter and the pool where I would swim has very limited hours. Backpacking is great, but it requires long stretches of time to actually get on a trail and let things go. Some of my best decisions have been made during long, quiet backpacking trips.

So while swimming and hiking are fun from the start, running took some time to really grow on me. I love it now, but it took time to build up my confidence, running identity, and a healthy endorphin addiction.
I’m a big fan of Shaun of the Dead, physiotherapy so when I started seeing the trailers for Run Fatboy Run staring Simon Pegg, I got pretty excited. He’s playing an out of shape guy who plans to run a marathon to prove his commitment to a woman that he used to be engaged to. Or something like that — it doesn’t really matter. I’ll see it when it comes out.

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OMG — Don’t see Fantastic Four!

The title says it all.  I’m only admitting that I went in the hopes that I’ll save someone else from seeing it.  I just got back and it was embarrassing just watching that film.  Let’s see: bad CG, this site anesthetist link bad fake contacts, cheesy dialog, BAD dance sequence at Mr. Fantastic’s bachelor’s party — as bad as my dad dancing at a club if he had stretchy limbs — gratuitous product placement, gratuitous scenes of the Great Wall and the London Eye.  Bad physics — apparently rivers run completely dry (upstream and downstream) when you put a big hole in them.

Even the people in the theater were bad — there was a woman with an infant sitting behind us who laughed at things that weren’t even remotely funny.  I think she was the person that the director used to screen the movie — BAD CHOICE.  She’s the kind of person who would laugh at tax forms.

Good parts:
The Torch is still a hottie
The popcorn was good

Seriously, I nearly walked out of the theater.  WHY are there so few good superhero movies?  The genre needs a Battlestar Galactica treatment so grown-up nerds like me can take normal people to them and not have to apologize. 

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